Moral Development
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Moral Development
"Everything has a moral, if only you can find it" - L.C.
Curated by Cindy Tam
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Bites » Hobbes on the State

Bites » Hobbes on the State | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"What is the state and how should it be organised? Quentin Skinner sheds light on Thomas Hobbes' answers to these fundamental questions in political philosophy in this latest episode of Philosophy Bites."

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Research » Truth-telling Thumbs: You're More Honest When You're Texting

Research » Truth-telling Thumbs: You're More Honest When You're Texting | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Even when they're in a rush, people are less likely to tweak the truth when communicating on their mobile devices than when they're having a face-to-face conversation.
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Research » Why Did We Invent Karma?

Research » Why Did We Invent Karma? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Is there something about karma that makes it appealing to individuals in specific moments of their lives? A new study by Benjamin Converse, Jane Risen, and Travis Carter suggests that there is. In a series of experiments they found evidence to support the idea that when people face an important outcome that’s out of their control, they believe that being charitable can somehow induce a positive outcome.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Research » Morality, Power and the Banks

"Power – whether unconsciously primed in the mind or actually given over other people in an experimental situation – made volunteers much more likely to advocate rule-based decisions, and less likely to advocate outcome-based decisions: minds primed with power were more likely to say that threatening Magnus Gäfgen was wrong and that the doctor should tell the boy about his terminal diagnosis. Minds primed with powerlessness were much more likely to say that threatening torture was justified and that the doctor should let the boyfriend go on holiday without knowing his diagnosis.

 

Power, then, makes people more moral, or at the very least rule-following – or does it?"

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Books » Conservatives have broader moral sense than liberals, says ‘Righteous Mind’ author

Books » Conservatives have broader moral sense than liberals, says ‘Righteous Mind’ author | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"Political ideology is an extension of morality — and morality, as Mr. Haidt is fond of saying in his new book, binds and blinds.  [...]  “The left and right in this country,” Mr. Haidt says in reference to his new book, “are two separate cultures.”"

 

How much of your moral palette are you utilizing?

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News » Peter Singer: ‘World’s Most Dangerous Man’ or Hero of Morality?

"SYDNEY, Australia (JTA) — He’s been brandished “the most dangerous man on earth,” accused of being a “public advocate of genocide” and likened to Josef Mengele, the notorious Nazi “Angel of Death.”

 

Yet he’s also been hailed as “one of the world’s 100 most influential people” and “among the most influential philosophers alive.”"

 

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Perspectives » Science Channel: Can We Eliminate Evil?

Perspectives » Science Channel: Can We Eliminate Evil? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"From the dawn of recorded history to the present day, humankind has struggled with its darker nature. Today, researchers around the world are uncovering the hidden forces that inflame our inner demons...looking for ways to isolate and neutralize the source of evil in the brain.


In Amsterdam, neuroscientist Christian Keysers tests empathy by torturing his lab assistants, who willingly allow it in the name of science. At Yale, psychologist Karen Wynn and a pack of adorable babies prove that, from birth, most of us have a built-in sense of morality."


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Claudio Cordovil's comment, June 29, 2012 7:27 AM
Congrats, Sakis! Your curated topic always terrific !
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, June 29, 2012 10:13 AM
Thank you Claudio. It's more easy because I have found terrific curators here, in Scoop.it.
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Research » Giving Makes Toddlers Happier than Getting, May Explain Why Humans Evolved Self-Sacrifice

Research » Giving Makes Toddlers Happier than Getting, May Explain Why Humans Evolved Self-Sacrifice | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Giving makes toddlers happier than receiving, according to new findings that may help explain why people act pro-socially, even when doing so often involves sacrifice.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Research » Effects of Beliefs in Heaven and Hell on Crime Rates

"Though religion has been shown to have generally positive effects on normative ‘prosocial’ behavior, recent laboratory research suggests that these effects may be driven primarily by supernatural punishment. Supernatural benevolence, on the other hand, may actually be associated with less prosocial behavior."

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Perspectives » The Pros and Cons of Sacrificing for the Ones We Love

Perspectives » The Pros and Cons of Sacrificing for the Ones We Love | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Research » What Underlies Winning Performances?

Research » What Underlies Winning Performances? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"Scientists trying to understand why some people excel — whether as world-class athletes, virtuoso musicians, or top CEOs — have discovered that these outstanding performers have unique brain characteristics that make them different from other people.

 

A study published in May in the journal Cognitive Processing found that 20 top-level managers scored higher on three measures — the Brain Integration Scale, Gibbs's Socio-moral Reasoning questionnaire, and an inventory of peak experiences — compared to 20 low-level managers that served as matched controls. This is the fourth study in which researchers have been able to correlate the brain's activity with top performance and peak experiences, having previously studied world-class athletes and professional classical musicians."

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»» Critical Thinking Wiki and Teaching Resources

A wiki for teaching critical thinking via Howard Rheingold


Via Beth Kanter
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News » Moral Dystopia

News » Moral Dystopia | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"We hope we would be Sir Thomas More in “A Man for All Seasons,” who dismisses his daughter’s pleas to compromise his ideals and save his life, saying: “When a man takes an oath, Meg, he’s holding his own self in his own hands. Like water. And if he opens his fingers then, he needn’t hope to find himself again.”

 

But with formerly hallowed institutions and icons sinking into a moral dystopia all around us, has our sense of right and wrong grown more malleable? What if we’re not Thomas More but Mike McQueary?

 

As our institutions decay, is our sense of right and wrong crumbling as well?"

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Research » The Secret Life of Pronouns

Research » The Secret Life of Pronouns | Moral Development | Scoop.it

07 September 2011 - The smallest words in our vocabulary often reveal the most about us, including our levels of honesty and thinking style...

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Perspectives » Why Thinking About Your Death May Prompt You to Save the Planet

Perspectives » Why Thinking About Your Death May Prompt You to Save the Planet | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Thinking about your own death isn’t usually the most pleasant experience, but it can be a beneficial one.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Snippets

Snippets | Moral Development | Scoop.it
A person’s moral development is largely shaped by a role model. It is the moral duty of every citizen to act as good role models, especially those who are in the public eye.
Aristotle
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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 9, 2012 8:12 AM
true
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Perspectives » The Downside of Liberty

Perspectives » The Downside of Liberty | Moral Development | Scoop.it
For hippies and bohemians as for businesspeople and investors, the extreme individualism of the ’60s has been triumphant. Selfishness won.

 

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Research » You Want to Know the Truth? (2010)

How can you increase your chances of telling Truth from Lie? 

 

Don't Mimic.

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Book in Progress » A History of Moral Thought [Part 17]: Science, Nihilism & Morality

Book in Progress » A History of Moral Thought [Part 17]: Science, Nihilism & Morality | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"I am currently writing a book: a history of moral thought, to be published by Atlantic in 2012. (I am pretty sure of the title, but until it is fixed, it will just remain ‘the book’). The aim of the book is to explore the development of moral thought within its social and historical context and to address the question: Why is it that we live in an age in which we are increasingly drawn to view issues in moral terms and yet possess such an impoverished moral vocabulary? I thought it might be useful from time to time to post in Pandaemonium small sections from the book, and to open it up for discussion, debate and criticism. So here are bits of a book in progress."

 

-Kenan Malik

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Research » Humble People Are More Helpful

Research » Humble People Are More Helpful | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Some personality types are more generous than others, with humble people more willing to lend a helping hand than their arrogant counterparts, new research suggests.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 28, 2012 6:55 AM
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Interview » Delta Rae Thinks it's Cool to Care

Interview » Delta Rae Thinks it's Cool to Care | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Moral is the new Green.

Is the value of a movement diluted when embraced for the sake of popularity?

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Books » Ethical Trade: 'Good Intentions go to Waste'

Swedish consumers are increasingly buying fair trade, vegetarian and ecological products, but is it really making the world a better place?
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Research » More Reasons to be Nice

"A polite act shows respect. But a [...] study of a common etiquette -- holding a door for someone -- suggests that courtesy may have a more practical, though unconscious, shared motivation: to reduce the work for those involved."

 

 

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Books » How Much Is Enough?

Books » How Much Is Enough? | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Our obsession with endless growth is actually robbing us of the good life, argue Robert and Edward Skidelsky. They identify seven basic needs that make up the good life, and they lay out some radical social proposals to achieve them.
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Perspectives » The Cure for Collective Self-Harm?

Perspectives » The Cure for Collective Self-Harm? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

A short synopsis of an even more fascinating entry from The Guardian.  Do your brain a favor and read both.

 

"'The City', suggests that the industry's true madness is that it's run by some  pathological individuals. Aside from them, everyone else is just a disillusioned  follower." - Business Insider

 

"In youth psychology there's a well-known phenomenon regarding collective self-harming. You have a shelter that's housing, say, 50 boys. All of a sudden and apparently out of nowhere, they all start mutilating themselves. A wave. It's only natural for outsiders to assume that something must be very wrong with that shelter. However, research and experience demonstrate that all you need to do is find the one person who started it. Isolate him from the group and lo and behold, the wave stops and everything goes back to normal." - The Guardian

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