Moral Development
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Moral Development
"Everything has a moral, if only you can find it" - L.C.
Curated by Cindy Tam
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Perspectives » Why We Lie and How to Stop

Perspectives » Why We Lie and How to Stop | Moral Development | Scoop.it

In her research, Bella DePaulo, Ph.D. found that people lie in one in five of their daily interactions. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, claims in her TED Talk that we’re lied to from 10-200 times a day. It’s important to consider: how honest is the world we’ve created around ourselves? How often do we ourselves tell lies? And, on the flip side, do we intimidate others in ways that might encourage them to shade the truth?

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'Evolution will punish you if you're selfish and mean'

'Evolution will punish you if you're selfish and mean' | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Two Michigan State University evolutionary biologists offer new evidence that evolution doesn't favor the selfish, disproving a theory popularized in 2012. "We found evolution will punish you if yo...

Via Howard Rheingold, Mariana Soffer
Cindy Tam's insight:

Long-term Success: Are you willing to forgo your selfishness and meanness?

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Peter C. Newton-Evans's curator insight, August 3, 2013 10:36 AM

Science is debunking the myth that the need for competition to survive has genetically programmed selfish, aggressive competitive propensities through evolution. The only way we or any other species survived was through both inter- and intra-species cooperation. The present-day structuring of society in terms of win-lose games needs to change if we are to continue surviving. 

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Perspectives » Does Great Literature Make Us Better?

The view that literary fiction educates and civilizes its readers is widespread, and unproven.

Via Wildcat2030
Cindy Tam's insight:

How do we take an honest account of our character in the first place?  Do we take one at all?

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How the Supreme Court Gene Patent Decision Will Affect Biotech - D-brief

How the Supreme Court Gene Patent Decision Will Affect Biotech - D-brief | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Naturally-occurring human genes cannot be patented the Supreme Court ruled. The decision centered on BRCA genes whose patents are owned by Myriad Genetics.
Cindy Tam's insight:

Sometimes the bigger picture requires us to ask questions of greater relevance to our condition:  How can patents on genes and biological products benefit us?  In what ways can they harm us?

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Cruel and Unusual Punishment: The Shame of Three Strikes Laws | Politics News | Rolling Stone

Cruel and Unusual Punishment: The Shame of Three Strikes Laws | Politics News | Rolling Stone | Moral Development | Scoop.it
While Wall Street crooks walk, thousands sit in California prisons for life over crimes as trivial as stealing socks

Via James Burns
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Why You Shouldn’t Curb Your Compassion

Why You Shouldn’t Curb Your Compassion | Moral Development | Scoop.it
A new study suggests there might be hidden costs to our callousness: It might harm our self-image and chip away at our commitment to morality.
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Perspectives » The Splintered Mind: Has Civilization Made Moral Progress?

Perspectives » The Splintered Mind: Has Civilization Made Moral Progress? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"From a certain perspective, current liberal Western civilization seems to be a moral pinnacle. We have rejected slavery. We have substantially de-legitimized aggressive warfare. We have made huge progress in advancing the welfare of children. We have made huge progress toward gender and racial equality. In his 2011 book The Better Angels of Our Nature, Steven Pinker says he is prepared to call our recent ancestors "morally retarded" (p. 658). Imagine how we would react if a Westerner today were seriously to endorse a set of views that would not have been radical in 1800: denying women the vote (or maybe even advocating a return to monarchy), viewing slavery and twelve-hour days of child labor in coal mines as legitimate business enterprises, advocating military conquest for the sake of glory, etc. "Morally retarded" might seem a fair assessment!"

 

'Morally retarded' or calling the kettle black?


Via Wildcat2030
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Research » Psychopaths may not suffer from a mental disorder

"It’s been long thought that psychopaths suffer from a mental disorder, but a new Queen’s University-led study casts doubt on this idea."

 

As children, parents and guardians are entrusted with responsibility until we are of age.  If an adult-aged individual were not responsible for his or her actions, who would be?  Can harmful or destructive behavior be addressed without valid accountability?

 

 

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Research » Reciprocity an important component of prosocial behavior

Research » Reciprocity an important component of prosocial behavior | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"While exchanging favors with others, humans tend to think in terms of tit-for-tat, an assumption easily extended to other animals. As a result, reciprocity is often viewed as a cognitive feat requiring memory, perhaps even calculation."

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Perspectives » Disenfranchised Felons

"The number of Americans who cannot vote because they have been convicted of a felony continues to grow. The Sentencing Project reported Thursday that in 2010 5.5 million voting-age citizens were disenfranchised because of their criminal records, up by 9 percent from 2004.  About a quarter are in prison, but the rest have completed their sentences or are on probation or parole."

 

How can felons change, demonstrate change, and be accepted by society as citizens and not felons after incarceration?

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Perspectives » #362 Life After Hate is Possible

Perspectives » #362 Life After Hate is Possible | Moral Development | Scoop.it

On listening to the CBC broadcast of Arno Michael's poignant story, Life after Hate, you hear of a personal transformation from harbinger of violence to champion of dignity.  But beyond the skepticism of a human's capacity to change, beyond recognition of the call he has answered with action, you hear admonitions for failing to turn himself in for his admissions.

 

I can understand the cry for blood, of an-eye-for-an-eye but in light of his words coupled with his actions we must queston ourselves.  What purpose does punishment and incarceration serve?  Is it protection of the public?  Is it to reform a harmful individual?  Is it to appease someone's outrage?


Via Cathryn Wellner
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Perspectives » The Power of Empathy vs. The Power of Bullies

"How would you feel if that happened to you?” If bystanders can truly understand what it's like to be a victim of bullying, they are more likely to intervene, offer support, or seek help.

 

This question opens the door to teaching children about empathy. Empathy is recognizing, understanding and caring about how someone feels, or being able to “put yourself in someone’s shoes. “Treat others the way you want to be treated” is the modified golden rule that conveys empathy.

 

Empathy is a key ingredient in families, friendships and other relationships. How can empathy reduce teasing and bullying? How can empathy weaken the power of bullies?"

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Research » FACE team seeks to melt 'Uncanny' ice for robot bonds

Research » FACE team seeks to melt 'Uncanny' ice for robot bonds | Moral Development | Scoop.it

11 July 2012 - "A robotics team from the University of Pisa in Italy has a challenge for the Uncanny Valley theory made famous by the 1970 essay of that name. Masahiro Mori had said when robots get too realistic they turn people off with a feeling of eerie distaste. The team from Pisa are intent on showing that robots with human expressions can be, well, liked. They would like to generate a new chapter of human like robots that do not churn up a sense of unease. They are focused on research that can demonstrate how manipulated expressions on robots can be made more attractive so that the human can cross over Mori’s dips of feelings of unease and creepiness."

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Perspectives » Justice Is in Our Nature

Perspectives » Justice Is in Our Nature | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Social contracts are written into our biology. As is the justice they need. The arc of our evolution has long bent towards the justice of “laws” fittest for team survival. We bred ourselves, by artificial selection, to internalize and feel strongly about social rules.


Via Mariana Soffer
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 9, 2013 5:20 PM

These social contracts are covenants and they create bonds that help us get through life. Humans have diminished these into legalistic ways of conducting business rather than trusting the other person.

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Young and Isolated

Young and Isolated | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Working-class 20- and 30-somethings are coming of age in a world of disappearing jobs, soaring education costs and shrinking social support networks.
Cindy Tam's insight:

We pursue a modern life of education, freedom, and independence, but what is the personal cost of embracing individualistic values in an increasingly disconnected culture?

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Mark Rowlands - Is there a right to believe? (read of the day)

Mark Rowlands - Is there a right to believe? (read of the day) | Moral Development | Scoop.it
You are entitled to believe what you will, but your beliefs must to be subject to criticism and scrutiny just like mine

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Here is a true story. A young philosophy lecturer — let us call him Shane — is charged with the task of introducing young minds to the wonders of philosophy. His course, a standard Introduction to Philosophy, contains a section on the philosophy of religion: the usual arguments-for-and-against-the-existence-of-God stuff. One of Shane’s students complains to Shane’s Dean that his cherished religious beliefs are being attacked. ‘I have a right to my beliefs,’ the student claims. Shane’s repeated interrogations of those beliefs amounts to an attack on this right to believe. Shane’s institution is not a particularly enlightened one. The Dean concurs with the student, and instructs Shane to desist in teaching philosophy of religion.

But what exactly does it mean to claim ‘a right to my beliefs’? It often comes up in a religious context, but can arise in others too. Shane could just as easily be teaching Marxist theory to a laissez-faire capitalist student, or imparting evidence for global warming to a global warming sceptic. Whatever the context, the claim of a right to one’s beliefs is a curious one. We might distinguish two different interpretations of this claim. First, there is the evidential one. You have an evidential right to your belief if you can provide appropriate evidence in support of it. I have, in this sense, no right to believe that the moon is made of green cheese because my belief is lacking in any supporting evidence.

 

Keep on reading..


Via Wildcat2030
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Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations | Moral Development | Scoop.it
The 29-year-old source behind the biggest intelligence leak in the NSA's history explains his motives, his uncertain future and why he never intended on hiding in the shadows
Cindy Tam's insight:

When do you take a stand for your principles and when do you quietly put them aside?  If you could stand up for your principles without repercussions how would your life be different?  Do individuals have a moral duty to disobey unjust laws?

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With few other outlets, inmates review prisons on Yelp

With few other outlets, inmates review prisons on Yelp | Moral Development | Scoop.it
The site best known for restaurant reviews has also become a place to report serious abuse.

Via James Burns
Cindy Tam's insight:

Rehabilitation or Punishment: When we think of someone in prison what do we desire for them?

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Google’s Silicon Valley morality tale

Google’s Silicon Valley morality tale | Moral Development | Scoop.it
Like it or not, Silicon Valley’s biggest tech companies are the embodiment of American democratic values in the world. Now, they need to play the part.
Cindy Tam's insight:

Do corporations have a duty to do the "right thing"?

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Perspectives » Moral Enhancement | Issue 91 | Philosophy Now

Perspectives » Moral Enhancement | Issue 91 | Philosophy Now | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Is moral enhancement a suitable "pill to kill the thin papery feeling" (Plath) of a flimsy moral compass?

 

Is it merely visible action or is it willful intent that makes you a moral creature?


Via Wildcat2030
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Issues » Canada should remove section of Criminal Code that permits physical punishment of children, expert argues

Issues » Canada should remove section of Criminal Code that permits physical punishment of children, expert argues | Moral Development | Scoop.it

Perhaps less a question of morality and more a question of effectiveness and appropriateness.

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Perspectives » One Molecule for Love, Morality, and Prosperity?

Perspectives » One Molecule for Love, Morality, and Prosperity? | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"Imagine a molecule that underlies the virtues that glue societies together. Imagine that it brought out the better angels of our nature with just a sniff and could “rebond our troubled world.” Imagine that it was the “source of love and prosperity” and explained “what makes us good and evil.”

 

Well, carry on imagining."

 

It's a bit more complicated than that.  A more comprehensive perspective on the function and effects of oxytocin.  How can we elicit this balanced, "bigger picture", critical-thinking perspective among the narrowly focused?

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Perspectives » A Confucian Constitution in China

"The view that China should become more democratic is widely held in the West. But framing the debate in terms of democracy versus authoritarianism overlooks better possibilities."

 

How do political systems evolve morally?

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Research » Rich People More Likely to Lie, Cheat, Study Suggests

Research » Rich People More Likely to Lie, Cheat, Study Suggests | Moral Development | Scoop.it

"The cream of society may rise to the top, but so might the scum — researchers now find that people in the upper crust may be more likely to engage in lying, cheating and other kinds of unethical activity than those in lower classes.

 

"It's not that hard to reverse these patterns of behavior," Piff added. "Even a simple reminder of the needs of other people actually does a lot to change patterns we'd otherwise document. As Warren Buffett said, the rich aren't necessarily bad — they just need to be reminded of that.""

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News » Financial Executives Confess: Sure, We Lie and Cheat

"You might not expect executives of top financial businesses to admit outright that they're crooks, but that's pretty much what they did in responding to a new survey released today by the whistleblower law firm Labaton Sucharow."

 

We know the problem exists, we know some of the variables, so what comes next?  How can we create systems with incentives for honesty and integrity rather than lying and cheating?

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