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Rescooped by Paul Carey from Taking a look at MOOCs
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What is a MOOC?

Written and Narrated by Dave Cormier Video by Neal Gillis Researchers: Dave Cormier Alexander McAuley George Siemens Bonnie Stewart Created through funding r...

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OER, Social Learning, MOOCS, Connectivism

OER, Social Learning, MOOCS, Connectivism | moocs | Scoop.it
Videos about openess in education: OER, Social learning, MOOCs, Connectivism and related topics. If you like please like it.

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MOOCs: technology platforms - Lexology (registration)

MOOCs: technology platforms - Lexology (registration) | moocs | Scoop.it
MOOCs: technology platforms
Lexology (registration)
Someone setting up a new MOOC would need to consider how to build the software platform.
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Monash eyes credit from MOOC platform FutureLearn - The Australian

Monash eyes credit from MOOC platform FutureLearn - The Australian | moocs | Scoop.it
Australian Techworld Monash eyes credit from MOOC platform FutureLearn The Australian Pro-vice chancellor (learning and teaching) Darrell Evans said offering credit towards its courses that are completed on FutureLearn something would consider as...
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MOOCs could be revolutionary, but US foreign policy is preventing that

MOOCs could be revolutionary, but US foreign policy is preventing that | moocs | Scoop.it
Aasis Vinayak: Banning Massive Open Online Courses in countries under US sanctions is a travesty. These students need them the most

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An interview with Canadian MOOC pioneer George Siemens | University Affairs

An interview with Canadian MOOC pioneer George Siemens | University Affairs | moocs | Scoop.it
George Siemens, Canada’s MOOC pioneer, opens up about where the movement is headed.

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Marta Torán's curator insight, February 13, 2014 8:47 AM

Una entrevista a George SIemens sobre los MOOCs. Su evolución. Las motivaciones de los alumnos para participar. Los movimientos que ese están produciendo entre los principales actores.

 

Muy interesante.

Rescooped by Paul Carey from Taking a look at MOOCs
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Jisc Inform / Issue 39, Spring 2014 | #jiscinform | MOOCs and copyright law

Jisc Inform / Issue 39, Spring 2014 | #jiscinform | MOOCs and copyright law | moocs | Scoop.it

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Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promises and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses | Parlor Press

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promises and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses | Parlor Press | moocs | Scoop.it

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promise and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses is one of the first collections of essays about the phenomenon of “Massive Online Open Courses.” Unlike accounts in the mainstream media and educational press, Invasion of the MOOCs is not written from the perspective of removed administrators, would-be education entrepreneurs/venture capitalists, or political pundits. Rather, this collection of essays comes from faculty who developed and taught MOOCs in 2012 and 2013, students who participated in those MOOCs, and academics and observers who have first hand experience with MOOCs and higher education. These twenty-one essays reflect the complexity of the very definition of what is (and what might in the near future be) a “MOOC,” along with perspectives and opinions that move far beyond the polarizing debate about MOOCs that has occupied the media in previous accounts. Toward that end, Invasion of the MOOCs reflects a wide variety of impressions about MOOCs from the most recent past and projects possibilities about MOOCs for the not so distant future.


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Paul Carey's insight:

The real story of moocs perhaps?

http://www.parlorpress.com/pdf/invasion_of_the_moocs.pdf

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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 26, 2014 8:42 AM

Although it focuses on the situation in the USA, this is a collection of essays that should command wider interest.  Not all of the arguments are novel, in fact, most have surfaced in one form or another in blogs, essays, reports, etc. However, this freely downloadable book places them in context and provides the authors room to argue somewhat more extensively than, say, a blog post would have allowed them. The papers are of varying quality, some more interesting than others, most recounting experiences with a particular instance of a MOOC - such as a course on writing. The introductory essay that sets the stage and the closing essay that wraps up the discussion are the exceptions, along with a few others that discuss such notions as usability and feedback. 

 

Singling out a few other essays, a section on privacy in the paper entitled ‘The hidden costs of MOOCs’ caught my attention as it discusses the threat that truly massive MOOCs pose to the professor(s) involved. Changing email address, moving office to a hard-to-find spot in the building may become a necessity in such cases. Another paper I found interesting discusses the user experience of MOOC software, which should make up for the lack of sociability but usually fails to do so (Coursera: Fifty ways to fix the software). ‘Another colonialist tool’ is an essay I also found particularly interesting, perhaps not surprisingly given my own feeling that the claimed democratising potential of MOOCs really is neocolonialism in disguise (http://pbsloep.blogspot.nl/2013/11/moocs-democratising-education-i-am-not.html). Under the title “MOOC assigned’ the idea of a MOOC as a textbook is discussed, that is, as a professor you assign a MOOC to your students and go through the experience of it jointly. This is a format I hadn’t hear of yet, which of course resembles open courseware initiatives but differs in that ‘your’ students mingle with the other ones. 

 

Some key words that appear throughout the book may help to give a sense of what its further coverage: xMOOc, cMOOC, research, history, costing, business model, course design, student ratio, instructor, openness, copyright, feedback, credit, usability, openness.

@pbsloep

Beth Dailey's curator insight, March 31, 2014 7:11 AM

Great collection of essays on MOOCs.

Theophilus's curator insight, April 3, 2014 3:49 AM

Great lessons to learn for our South African Higher Education institutions who are embarking on e-learning and online-course alternatives. We do not have to commit the same mistakes.

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HEA publishes first research into learning and teaching of Massive Open Online courses (MOOCS)


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How Do You Say 'MOOC' in Arabic? - Foreign Policy (blog)

How Do You Say 'MOOC' in Arabic? - Foreign Policy (blog) | moocs | Scoop.it
How Do You Say 'MOOC' in Arabic? Foreign Policy (blog) "Edraak," which translates into "Cognition" or "Understanding," is a new MOOC platform developed by Jordan's Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development in cooperation with edX, the...
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Changing Higher Education to Change the World – #FutureEd - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Changing Higher Education to Change the World – #FutureEd - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | moocs | Scoop.it

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Is 2014 the Year of the Corporate MOOC? Infographic

Is 2014 the Year of the Corporate MOOC? Infographic | moocs | Scoop.it
The Is 2014 the Year of the Corporate MOOC? Infographic presents the evolution in corporate training and 7 types of corporate MOOCs.

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MOOCs 101 | TED Playlist

MOOCs 101 | TED Playlist | moocs | Scoop.it
Given that it’s the internet age and all, why should classrooms look exactly the way they have for centuries? Here, TED speakers on what can happen when we bring education online … and open it up to anyone who wants to learn, anywhere.

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180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?)

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?) | moocs | Scoop.it
If you haven’t tried a free MOOC, I’d do it sooner than later. In recent weeks, the whole MOOC project took a hit when a University of Pennsylvania study found what was becoming empirically obvious — that MOOCs generally have very low participation and completion rates, and what’s more, most of the students taking the courses are “disproportionately educated, male, [and] wealthy,” and from the United States. This study, combined with other disappointing experiments and findings, will likely make universities think twice about sinking money into creating MOOCs (they can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 to develop). It might take another 6-12 months to see the shift. But I’d hazard a guess that this January might be the peak of the free MOOC trend. Enjoy them while they last. Whatever their shortcomings, they can be quite informative, and you can’t beat the price.

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:49 AM

Very little of this do I find this surprising.

MFaculty's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:44 PM

The insights revealed through the previous studies serves to codify what many educators, and even more marketers knew intuitively; free always begs the question of quality. Don't hear what I'm not saying. I'm not saying ALL MOOCs are low quality, I'm merely saying that without academic rigor and effective management, even the best intentions can slide off the rails.

 

I too had noted a number of previous MOOC supporters distancing themselves from the initiatives. Was there ever an identified demand for MOOCs, or were they simply a result of benevolent thinking? Regardless, it is interesting that the 'target audience' for MOOCs are apparently the ones taking least advantage of them. Perhaps the age old marketing rendition of supply and demand has merit still has merit.

Tammy Morley's curator insight, January 8, 2014 7:43 PM

Food for thought.