MOOCs and OERs
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MOOCs and OERs
A space to share differing views on MOOCs and OERs with H817 students and other interested readers.
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MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH

MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

With Coursera and edX both announced this week they are doubling the number of universities partners, I decided to update the data. I also added another MOOC: Futurelearn

One more thing that was added to the visualisation is the average University World Ranking by MOOCs.


Via Peter B. Sloep
Patricia Daniels's insight:

Good visuals overview here.

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Top Free Classes's comment, March 7, 2013 10:55 PM
Thanks!
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 8, 2013 7:45 AM

Ackn. Justin Menard - interest in Rankings by MOOCs and Uni's

Justin Menard's comment, May 7, 2013 8:59 PM
I have updated the visualisation with the most recent information, added 2 new Moocs and 5 more world university rankings

We now have 6 MOOCs in the Viz: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn, Iversity, OpenEd and Udacity
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Your Massively Open Offline College Is Broken | Clay Shirky - The Awl

Your Massively Open Offline College Is Broken | Clay Shirky - The Awl | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

For all our good will, college in the U.S. has gotten worse for nearly everyone who relies on us. For some students—millions of them—the institutions in which they enroll are more reliable producers of debt than education. This has happened on our watch.

In the academy, we have a lot of good ideas and a lot of practice at making people smarter, but it’s not obvious that we have the best ideas, and it is obvious that we don’t have all the ideas. For us to behave as if we have—or should have—a monopoly on educating adults is just ridiculous.

 


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:25 AM

A passionate plea by Clay Shirkey to take MOOCs seriously. They may be a threat to higher education (in the USA) as we know it, he says, but if you look carefully, it is not obvious that you would want to conserve higher education as we know it. He mentions several reasons. The rise in tuitions and the concomitant decline in the value of a bachelor degrees is one of them. The discrepancy between how colleges and universities see and portray themselves and the way they actually are, another. And, finally, schools should stop fighting the effects the internet has on education but rather embrace them. MOOCs are a way to do so. 

 

If MOOCs are contrasted with an ideal of education that no longer exists (except perhaps in ivy league schools, where tuition fees are inaffordable to 90% of the people), we're making an unfair comparison. Still, even if we were to grant that the need for online education with MOOCs or other systems is an economic necessity, we should discuss if we want this to be so. If this 'happened under our watch', perhaps we should fight the ideology or convictions that led to this dire situation rather than give in and accept second-best learning experiences. Unless, of course, the experiences are not second best (and I am restricting myself here to adolescents who engage in higher education). But then I want to hear an argument for why this is the case better than the argument from analogy, which basically says that after the music industry education is next inline. (@pbsloep)

suifaijohnmak's comment, February 20, 2013 6:50 PM
Is MOOC an ideal education model? What is best learning experience? Is it based on an institutional education model? What features of an institutional model would provide such best learning experience? Is learning experience the only criteria in evaluating education?
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We Don't Need No Educator | Stephen Downes

Described the changing nature of online learning with the introduction of massive open online courses, and in that context describes and explains the changing roles of the educator

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Anne Whaits's curator insight, February 15, 2013 1:25 PM

In the context of MOOCs and online learning, Stephen Downes describes the role of teacher as the LEARNER (collector, connector, curator, artist, sharer, scientist), the DESIGNER (programmer,alchemist, convenor), the COACH (salesperson, agitator, mentor, co-ordinator, facilitator, conversationalist, tech support) and the EXPERT (lecturer, moderator, demonstrator, broadcaster, theoriser, evaluator, beaurocrat). Love it!

Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 15, 2013 1:31 PM

Read Anne's comment, have got nothing to add to that really (@pbsloep)

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MoocGuide | a wiki

MoocGuide | a wiki | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

"This MOOC guide was first initiated by Inge de Waard who organized the MobiMOOC. MobiMOOC was a course that used the MOOC format to provide a framework for all MOOC participants to learn or deepen their knowledge on mobile learning (mLearning). 

After the MOOC guide was first initiated, the guide was opened up for all to add and strengthen the guide so it can/could be used by all interested parties."


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Patricia Daniels's insight:

H817 students you might be interested in editing this wiki.

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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 12, 2013 4:05 AM

A guide for anybody who wants to try out the MOOC format in nine chapters (history, use of social media, facilitating, references, to name just four) or those steeped in the MOOC format who want to contribute. To be sure, this is about the connectivist kind of MOOC (cMOOC), not the xMOOCs that stirr up all the excitement. A cMOOC is very much less about instruction and much more about networked (social, connecitivist) learning. (@pbsloep)

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:34 PM

Looks like a great guide and it can have input added to build the giude.

Hector Rosero's curator insight, February 14, 2013 11:23 PM

It's an excellent guide for to design Moocs. This course is available in Wikispaces.com.

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Higher Ed Trends: MOOCs, Tablets, Gamification, and Wearable Tech | MindShift

Higher Ed Trends: MOOCs, Tablets, Gamification, and Wearable Tech | MindShift | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images As tech tools continue to proliferate with new launches and new products, it's difficult to predict what will stick and

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H817 students some interesting links to follow up on including the 2013 Horizon Report.

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What MOOCs Will, Won't, and Might Do - Edudemic

What MOOCs Will, Won't, and Might Do - Edudemic | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Ivy League school officials suggest that one of the biggest impacts of massive online open courses – MOOCs – could be a renewed focus on teaching over research at elite American universities.
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Interesting to have a brief insight into the affects MOOCs are having on pedagogical changes within some lecture halls and how faculty are reacting.

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The day the MOOC invented Social Media (a very short perspective about MOOCs) — eter

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An analysis of MOOCs here from a personal perspective and an interesting response.

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The emerging MOOC data/analytics ecosystem | Simon BuckinghamShum

The emerging MOOC data/analytics ecosystem | Simon BuckinghamShum | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

"We are about to see the emergence of a MOOC data/analytics ecosystem. Part of the value proposition to partners who sign up to deliver courses on a given MOOC platform is the access to high quality data on what happens with those courses.

...

This piece is not about interoperability standards and protocols, but about how trusted partnerships may emerge to assist ethical data sharing within and between MOOCs, in order to turbocharge educational innovation — one of the primary reasons that institutions are dipping their toes in the MOOC space."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 1, 2013 5:33 AM

Fascinating thought experiment about sharing learner data between Courses, by different schools across different MOOC platforms. In the spirit of Learning Analytics, it could improve teaching and learning through various kinds of partnerships. Simon explains this quite well.  

 

Whom I miss from the equation is the learner. In the triple of MOOC provider, content providing school Partner and Course (see picture), I miss the L of learner (some would argue, also the T of teacher, but I assume giving teachers their due is the responsibility of the Partner institution). The L of learners matters, lest schools end up to be data providers for the MOOC platforms, who no doubt will do what Facebook, Twitter and Google do with those data: sell them for a profit (after all, the course is free, so that is the deal you knowingly make as a learner). The picture is less bleak if schools (Partners) host their own MOOC platforms rather than use the commercial ones. But even then explicit attention right from the beginning for the learner's privacy is needed, not because the law tells us so, but because we need to take learners seriously. See also my blog posts on Online Learner Identities where I discuss the problem and some possible solutions. Find the last one here: http://tiny.cc/c15nrw ; (@pbsloep)

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PL Newsletter - 2013 is "The Year of the Learner"

PL Newsletter - 2013 is "The Year of the Learner" | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

We agree with George Couros and Will Richardson that 2013 will be the "Year of the Learner." We are seeing a big culture shift around the world to personalize learning for all learners. When learners are given a greater voice in how they learn, they are more motivated and engaged in their learning. When learners have choices in how they prefer to access and engage with content, and then express what they know, they take ownership of their learning. We encourage you to take one action this "Year of the Learner" by encouraging learner voice and choice.


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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, January 29, 2013 10:57 AM

The focus in education for 2013 is The Learner!  This newsletter includes news you will want to share with colleagues everywhere. Take a look at what is featured in this January issue:

 

>> 10 Predicitions for Personalized Learning in 2013

>> Let's Remember the Himan Element: The Learner

>> Don't Forget The Other Human Element: The TEacher

>> Join in the Conversations @ Persoanlized Learning in LinkedIn

>> Special Promotional Offer for "The 5 W's of PL" eCourse

>> FREE Pre-Assessment Report and Consultation

 

Sign up for future newsletters at www.personalizelearning.com (right column).

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MOOCs are here. How should state universities respond? | Dangerously Irrelevant

MOOCs are here. How should state universities respond? | Dangerously Irrelevant | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Here is a short essay on MOOCs that Drs. Steve Vardeman and Max Morris, Statistics faculty at Iowa State University, gave me permission to
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Personalize Learning: Culture Shift: When the Learner Owns the Learning

Personalize Learning: Culture Shift: When the Learner Owns the Learning | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
It is not about learner-centered instruction; it is about the learner owning their learning.
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The Ed Techie: MOOCs are your friends

The Ed Techie: MOOCs are your friends | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
(I know what you're thinking: "if only someone would write an opinion blog post on MOOCs, there just aren't any out there"). Reactions to MOOCs tend to fall into two camps. The first is the MOOC...
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Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org

Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
RT @azhar_youssef: #diffimooc #etmooc How to organize MOOCs http://t.co/tE72KQyf I love the term "PEERAGOGY"

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MOOCs and Digital Diploma Mills: Forgetting Our History | David Wiley

When David Noble first published his groundbreaking critique of online education in 1998, Digital Diploma Mills: The Automation of Higher Education (http://tiny.cc/vee0sw), I thought to myself “he couldn’t be more wrong.” As it turns out he might not have been wrong – maybe Noble was simply so miraculously prescient that I couldn’t see what he saw. Fifteen – count them, fifteen – years later, Digital Diploma Mills reads as if it were researched and written about the current phenomenon called “MOOCs.”


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H817 students, another perspective here about xMOOCs. I think it's healthy to see so much debate going on. The comments are interesting.

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Paulo Moekotte's comment, February 25, 2013 1:01 PM
It's also striking to see that the phrase: "that while they are studying their courses, their courses are studying them" could very well be applied to the current efforts with regard to learning analytics.
Paulo Moekotte's comment, February 25, 2013 1:22 PM
There is no doubt in my mind that certain new delivery models could render faculty obsolete in as much as certain skills are concerned. Although the development of Virtual U. was not a success everywhere (remember the disastrous attempt in the UK and the relative short lifetime of the HigherEd based Virtual U in the Netherlands), the OUNL could serve as an excellent use case of how 'new' delivery models can be successful. So the question, when reading Noble, that comes to mind is what these new skills of faculty would look like, if faculty is no longer expected to act as the proverbial 'sage on the stage'. I would guess that another development, i.e. flipping the classroom, might give us new (albeit not entirely new) ideas or insights about skills that are demanded from faculty when talking about 21stC education. Taking it as far as the '#valueadded discussion' regarding educational quality that is currently dominating the US, one could ask the question what the added value of 21stC teachers should be and how this would affect the classical PCK-model devloped by Shulman.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, February 25, 2013 4:19 PM
I still vividly remember David Noble's article and having a reaction similar to yours: obviously we don't want diploma mills, but that doesn't mean, as he seems to argue, that we should leave education untouched. And we haven't. Indeed, not at open universities as my own Open University of the Netherlands, not at the OU (UK), not at the UOC in Catalunya, not elsewhere. All these experiments with novel instructional models incorporated online interaction, at first online information collecting (compare web 1.0, the information web), later on increasingly online collaboration (compare web 2.0, the social web).. I think you now can safely say that open universities (and many other universities which practice distance teaching) have developed blended learning designs, with a mix of offline and online in differing proportions, with different media mixes also suited to the occasion. Your flipped classroom is one such design, long practiced before it became known as such. Although in these models learner self-directedness is assumed and a generous helping of metacognitive skills offers a better chance at being successful, they are different than xMOOCs in that 'teachers' still do play a role. But, as you rightly point out, their different roles are often allotted to different people. Whereas an 'ordinary' teacher may be designer, developer, tutor, mentor, coach and assessor at the same time, at open universities (most of) these roles are fulfilled by different people. If MOOCs would (finally) lead to the inclusion of these kinds of insights in traditional university education, I think MOOCs have done a tremendously important job, even if it means that MOOC providers are reinventing knowledge that is already available in the literature. If MOOCs would lead to education without teachers (even education that includes the kind of distribution of labour I described) or to its privatisation, I think MOOCs have done society a huge disservice.
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Professor Leaves a MOOC in Mid-Course in Dispute Over Teaching | Steve Kolowich - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Professor Leaves a MOOC in Mid-Course in Dispute Over Teaching | Steve Kolowich - The Chronicle of Higher Education | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

Students regularly drop out of massive open online courses before they come to term. For a professor to drop out is less common.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:10 AM

As Steve Kolowich aptly notes "[McKenzie's] departure marks the second debacle for Coursera this month." As many already have argued in response to the first 'disaster' (http://tiny.cc/lidpsw), such events are the growing pains of any innovation. Still I can't help but think that a clear contractual agreement between Coursera, the professor in question (McKenzie) and his institute (UCAL at Irvine), could have prevented this debacle. (When you read the article, the disagreement seems to be between McKenzie and his university over what constitutes a proper teaching style for MOOCs). Not to anticipate these kinds of issues is not taking the 37,000 students that apparently have enrolled and 'their hopes and dreams' (as Tony Bates puts it) seriously. I really think there is no excuse for such a lack of professionalism. Whether the course is free of not, doesn't really matter. Nor does whether MOOCs are generally speaking an innovation to be welcomed or frowned upon. (@pbsloep)

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The Most Thorough Description (to date) of University Experience with MOOC -

The Most Thorough Description (to date) of University Experience with MOOC - | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
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Some interesting data here as well as follow up comments. Read the report for a more in depth coverage.

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The missing perspective(s) on MOOCs?

The missing perspective(s) on MOOCs? | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Yesterday I had the opportunity to listen to Sir John Daniel give a presentation titled "Higher Education Futures: Keeping an open mind". The text and slides from the presentation are available her...
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Some interesting points raised here as well as in the follow up discussion. Useful links for further reading and research.

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Analyzing MOOCs - A SWOT Analysis | Andrew Spinner

"One of my many roles at @Understoodit includes conducting onging analysis and research of education technology tools and trends.  One of the most interesting and heavily discussed areas relates to what is known as Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC for short.  MOOCs are like your typical university style class – a professor, students, homework, and exams.  However, these courses are open to anyone, anywhere in the world, and the majority of them are completely FREE." 

via http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:37 AM

And then Andrew continues his story with an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses MOOCs are characterised by, the opportunities they offer and the threats they face (yes, a SWOT analysis). It is a useful analysis, not because if offers much that MOOC watchers wouldn't know yet, but because it puts these arguments in a neatly organised row. He makes a big thing out of the fact that MOOCs are free and that they are offered by 'extremely reputable schools and professors'.

 

However, I find it curious that under threats or opportunites the effect MOOCs may have on the way higher education is going to be organised, in the first instance in the US but later on also elsewhere, is not mentioned at all. And yet, if MOOCs are going to be disruptive it is in this department. If this is an opportunity or threat I leave to you to decide. (@pbsloep)

Emily Purser's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:04 AM

and the threats and opportunities of the implications for the potentially largest 'market' of all in this new medium - the students outside the anglosphere...

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How NOT to Design a MOOC: The Disaster at Coursera and How to Fix it | Debbie Morrison

How NOT to Design a MOOC: The Disaster at Coursera and How to Fix it | Debbie Morrison | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

I don’t usually like to title a post with negative connotations, but there is no way to put a positive spin on my experience with the MOOC I’m enrolled in through Coursera, Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application. The course so far is a disaster, ‘a mess’ as numerous students have called it. Ironically, the learning outcome of the course is to create our own online course. To be fair, there are some good points to the course, but there are significant factors contributing to a frustrating course experience for students, myself included.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 4, 2013 7:40 AM

And this is the blog post that took the lead in going public about the disastrous Coursera course (referred to in Inside Higher Ed, next to this scoop). Make sure you read the discussion too! (@pbsloep)

suifaijohnmak's comment, February 4, 2013 8:46 AM
I did read through all. I think the course could be salvaged if the organiser just changed it to a connectivist course - with adaptive feedback and re-organise it so it is based on distributed learning, where networks, groups and collectives co-exist. Learning could then be fun, even with 40,000 + or even more. I also think that there are both emotions and reasons all mixed in blog posts, with love/dislikes all subject to personal perceptions and experience. As I have always shared, it is the assumptions that could change everything, including how one would perceive their MOOCs. Would we have assumed a MOOC is suiting those who register with the course? If the assumption is true, then what could be done instead to make it a success?
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Coursera

Coursera | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
We are a social entrepreneurship company that partners with the top universities in the world to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free.
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bcewiki08 - Against connectivism

bcewiki08 - Against connectivism | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

"While the assertion that the world is more "connected" now than ever before is beyond dispute, George Siemens' connectivist learning theory is anything but. Siemens' theory argues that learning exists in a networked system, the more nodes and bigger the pipes of the network, the more learning has taken place. Siemens puts forth this theory because he found the older learning theory models inadequate in the age of technology. However, critics have described the theory as being internally confusing, more pedagogical in approach than actual learning theory, and too reliant on an idea that learning exists in non-human structures."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 30, 2013 3:52 AM
What follows is a page of summarised criticisms by Pløn Verhagen, Bill Kerr and others. The summary is useful to point out to the converted that Connectivism is not a theory beyond dispute, that criticisms may be leveled against it. However, it is not useful in that it fails to be generous. Perhaps Downes and Siemens should have been more modest in their claim to have a developed a new theory, but they undoubtedly have struck a chord with many people. Critique of the theoretical nature of Connectivism which fails to explain why so many people find Connectivism a useful idea, may be formally right, but fails to convince. And that is precisely what this page does, it is not convincing in its critique. (@pbsloep)
suifaijohnmak's comment, January 30, 2013 6:20 PM
Interesting points. I have shared my views here on learning may reside on non-human appliances http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/cck11-learning-with-connectivism-and-ant/ Whilst some of the principles may need further clarification, I think some of the "statements" made in the wiki post wasn't exactly what George has postulated, and thus just an interpretation of his paper. Besides, I would suggest the critique based on solid evidence, with arguments using practical examples, rather than assertion. Would there be issues in judging a theory (like connectivism) using an existing learning theory? This is like measuring a round hole with a square block, when the questions raised might have matched with the existing theorists (Behaviorist, Cognitivist, or Constructivist) creators or Supporters, but not necessary shifting a frame of reference in looking at the principles involved in the theory. There are also assumptions made based on experience of individuals or past researches may have over-shadow some of the important concepts underlying the theory. For instance, when we relate learning merely as experience, then we might have difficulties in explaining why some people who have very little experience could master certain skills and literacies even without much experience. I don't think every one would need to have such experience before they could learn. A typical example is in the MOOC, where most professors have little or even no experience in the past in teaching or facilitating in vast networks (of tens or hundreds of thousands students). This doesn't mean that these professors are not capable of teaching in such an environment, but that in reality, it is the technology which has afforded them to provide those "teaching moment" and thus one could claim to teach in a MOOC. Besides, who knows who have learnt and who haven't in a MOOC if the assessment is based solely on tests, quizzes, where students might only need to regurgitate, or repeat answering the questions until they remember the right answers. I used the above examples to illustrate how Connectivism might be used to explain the learning in such networks, in that experience is not the sole means of "gaining learning" as is mentioned in other learning theories. Rather, learning could be viewed as one of the networking experience, though it is not totally dependent on past experience, but could be those which relates to unknown pathways. Having more connections do not always lead to better learning, and so I don't think what was quoted in the paper is correct. Modesty in important as an attitude in education and sharing, though I would suggest to separate such attitude from discourse based on evidence, in our arguments. This is like presenting a research paper, whereas the main points might be based on the empirical findings. I would also argue that there needs to be changes for both parties to share and debate on each others' views. Finally, may I relate to my posts about Connectivism here?
Here is my post http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/my-reflection-on-connectivism-as-a-new-learning-theory-to-date/;
suifaijohnmak's comment, January 30, 2013 6:31 PM
Reposting my link here http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/my-reflection-on-connectivism-as-a-new-learning-theory-to-date/
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Revolution Hits the Universities

Revolution Hits the Universities | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Nothing has more potential to let us reimagine higher education than massive open online course, or MOOC, platforms.

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog
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The MOOC in Further Education Colleges – distraction or lever for change? | Learning Futures Lab | Cathy Ellis

"When not one, but two, Government Ministers start dropping the word ‘MOOC’ into their speeches and tweets, should those of us working in the field of Educational Technology be encouraged or worried? And, furthermore, when part of the rationale for such support is that British education is now part of the Coalition Government’s 2012 Industrial Strategy and some of the collective rhetoric comes close to a chauvinistic claim for the superiority of the British education system, then we seem to be entering into a global skirmish to put a competitive British MOOC into cyberspace."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 27, 2013 3:30 PM

This extensive and well-argued article takes an unusual stance in that it focusses on Further Education Colleges. Indeed, such a focus is badly needed as MOOCs and FE at first sight seem natural allies. And although the post is UK centric, it is well worth reading.

 

Cathy Ellis' argument consists of five points. Her first point, lack of funding on formal grounds, sounds specific to the UK, although others might recognise it. Her second is an interesting one, as it goes a long way towards explaining the success of MOOCs: "In the era of YouTube and TED, the ‘teacher as performer’ has taken root, and academics who would previously have stayed in their dusty lecture halls are now clamouring to be on stage. This has bred the era of the ‘rock star’ or ‘celebrity academic’ ...." This leads her to suggest to "Do your own TED-events and create your own YouTube channel".

 

Third, she advises against 'offshore' MOOC providers. A MOOC platform connected to the local VLE has the advantage of churning out useful data. This does not imply we should dismiss the "'industrial' scale MOOCs", they are "like an amplification of Open Educational Resources' and should be thus used, Cathy argues (4). Finally, MOOCs have done their job if their advent "mobilises leadership and policy makers to engage seriously with Educational Technology and support the sector in providing the conditions for it to flourish."

 

What the article argues for then, is to mainstream MOOCs: We use the technology to inspire our own teaching, we use the 'industrial' platforms and their content as OERs. Makes sense, if the colleges in HE and FE (and elsewhere) manage to survive the MOOC swell. With the "ever growing commodification of education" - Cathy's own words - this is no certainty, as I have argued elsewhere.

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Flipping, clicking, MOOCing into 2013!

Flipping, clicking, MOOCing into 2013! | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it
Just like Bono, we believe on this blog that technologies can help the world be a better place. Focusing on education is long-term planning for raising new generations of deciders. But it demands c...
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