MOOCs and OERs
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MOOCs and OERs
A space to share differing views on MOOCs and OERs with H817 students and other interested readers.
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Rescooped by Patricia Daniels from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH

MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

With Coursera and edX both announced this week they are doubling the number of universities partners, I decided to update the data. I also added another MOOC: Futurelearn

One more thing that was added to the visualisation is the average University World Ranking by MOOCs.


Via Peter B. Sloep
Patricia Daniels's insight:

Good visuals overview here.

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Top Free Classes's comment, March 7, 2013 10:55 PM
Thanks!
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 8, 2013 7:45 AM

Ackn. Justin Menard - interest in Rankings by MOOCs and Uni's

Justin Menard's comment, May 7, 2013 8:59 PM
I have updated the visualisation with the most recent information, added 2 new Moocs and 5 more world university rankings

We now have 6 MOOCs in the Viz: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn, Iversity, OpenEd and Udacity
Rescooped by Patricia Daniels from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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How NOT to Design a MOOC: The Disaster at Coursera and How to Fix it | Debbie Morrison

How NOT to Design a MOOC: The Disaster at Coursera and How to Fix it | Debbie Morrison | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

I don’t usually like to title a post with negative connotations, but there is no way to put a positive spin on my experience with the MOOC I’m enrolled in through Coursera, Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application. The course so far is a disaster, ‘a mess’ as numerous students have called it. Ironically, the learning outcome of the course is to create our own online course. To be fair, there are some good points to the course, but there are significant factors contributing to a frustrating course experience for students, myself included.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 4, 2013 7:40 AM

And this is the blog post that took the lead in going public about the disastrous Coursera course (referred to in Inside Higher Ed, next to this scoop). Make sure you read the discussion too! (@pbsloep)

suifaijohnmak's comment, February 4, 2013 8:46 AM
I did read through all. I think the course could be salvaged if the organiser just changed it to a connectivist course - with adaptive feedback and re-organise it so it is based on distributed learning, where networks, groups and collectives co-exist. Learning could then be fun, even with 40,000 + or even more. I also think that there are both emotions and reasons all mixed in blog posts, with love/dislikes all subject to personal perceptions and experience. As I have always shared, it is the assumptions that could change everything, including how one would perceive their MOOCs. Would we have assumed a MOOC is suiting those who register with the course? If the assumption is true, then what could be done instead to make it a success?
Rescooped by Patricia Daniels from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Professor Leaves a MOOC in Mid-Course in Dispute Over Teaching | Steve Kolowich - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Professor Leaves a MOOC in Mid-Course in Dispute Over Teaching | Steve Kolowich - The Chronicle of Higher Education | MOOCs and OERs | Scoop.it

Students regularly drop out of massive open online courses before they come to term. For a professor to drop out is less common.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:10 AM

As Steve Kolowich aptly notes "[McKenzie's] departure marks the second debacle for Coursera this month." As many already have argued in response to the first 'disaster' (http://tiny.cc/lidpsw), such events are the growing pains of any innovation. Still I can't help but think that a clear contractual agreement between Coursera, the professor in question (McKenzie) and his institute (UCAL at Irvine), could have prevented this debacle. (When you read the article, the disagreement seems to be between McKenzie and his university over what constitutes a proper teaching style for MOOCs). Not to anticipate these kinds of issues is not taking the 37,000 students that apparently have enrolled and 'their hopes and dreams' (as Tony Bates puts it) seriously. I really think there is no excuse for such a lack of professionalism. Whether the course is free of not, doesn't really matter. Nor does whether MOOCs are generally speaking an innovation to be welcomed or frowned upon. (@pbsloep)