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A Visual Primer On Learning Theory

A Visual Primer On Learning Theory | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Theories on how people learn are not new. Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky, Skinner and others have theorized for years how it is we come to
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A Big Step in MOOCs for Credit? The ASU & edX Global Freshman Academy - MOOC Report

A Big Step in MOOCs for Credit? The ASU & edX Global Freshman Academy - MOOC Report | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
ASU and edX announce the Global Freshman Academy, a series of freshman college-level courses that anyone can take for credit.
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6 Tips for Creating a 'Mini' MOOC

6 Tips for Creating a 'Mini' MOOC | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
There are ways to allow your institution to experiment with online courses, even if they're not intended to be "massive." An online program manager shares advice.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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The Future of MOOCs | Higher Ed Beta @insidehighered

The Future of MOOCs | Higher Ed Beta @insidehighered | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it

MOOCs are not dead, but MOOC mania has certainly abated.

Predictions made in 2012 that MOOCs would totally disrupt the existing higher education model were certainly exaggerated. But that does not mean that MOOCs won’t have an profound impact on the future of higher education.

As Bill Gates once said, “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next 10.”

MOOCS played a historic role in stimulating discussion in teaching across the academy. MOOCs engaged faculty and gave new legitimation to online education.

MOOCs also provided an experimental space where content specialists, instructional designers, and educational technologists could test new pedagogies and teaching tools including auto-grading, interactive simulations, and educational gaming,


Via Peter Mellow
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10 Million Students Have Taken A MOOC. Does The Model Work? - Online Learning Guide

10 Million Students Have Taken A MOOC. Does The Model Work? - Online Learning Guide | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
More than 10 million people have taken a Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) and it’s raising some serious questions about whether the trend... read more

Via Peter Mellow
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The Problems with Peer Grading in Coursera | Hack (Higher) Education @insidehighered

The Problems with Peer Grading in Coursera | Hack (Higher) Education @insidehighered | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it

When I wrote about the launch of online education startup Coursera back in April, one of the things that most intrigued me was the description that founders Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng gave of their plans for a peer-to-peer grading system. I’ve been a critic of the rise of the robot-graders — that is, the increasing usage of automated assessment software (used in other xMOOCS and online courses, as well as in other large-scale testing systems). While some assignments might lend themselves to being graded this way, I’ve been skeptical that automation is really the way to go for disciplines require essay-writing, despite the contention that robo-graders score just as well as humans do. Coursera said it would offer poetry classes (a modern poetry class starts this fall), and I just couldn’t see how even the most sophisticated artificial intelligence in the world could grade students’ intepretations and close readings.


Via Peter Mellow
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[INFOGRAPHIC] Bridging the Tech Skills Gap in Europe

[INFOGRAPHIC] Bridging the Tech Skills Gap in Europe | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
There will be almost a million unfilled information communications technology (ICT) jobs in Europe by 2020, according to the European Commission (EC). This predicted skills gap might prove a major...
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EDpuzzle

EDpuzzle | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Make any video your lesson. Edit a video by cropping it, adding your voice or embedding questions. Then, track your students with powerful hassle-free analytics.

Via Daniela Casiraghi
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Daniela Casiraghi's curator insight, July 9, 2014 8:54 AM

Piattaforma per creare ed editare video, caricando nella propria "classe". possibilità di gestire l'intero flusso del corso.

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7 Online Quiz Tools Perfect For Classrooms - Edudemic

7 Online Quiz Tools Perfect For Classrooms - Edudemic | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Whether you want to have students turn in work via an online form or simply take a quiz or test, online quiz tools are critical for connected classrooms.
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Coursera Partners with University of Illinois to Launch iMBA - MOOC Report

Coursera Partners with University of Illinois to Launch iMBA - MOOC Report | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Announcing the first online MBA on Coursera from the University of Illinois called iMBA
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Arizona State U 'MOOCs for credit' program faces unanswered accreditation questions

Arizona State U 'MOOCs for credit' program faces unanswered accreditation questions | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it

Arizona State University has yet to brief its accreditor about plans to award credit through massive open online courses to thousands of students at the same time. While the university is unconcerned, accreditation experts are unsure if federal or regional regulations could derail the initiative.

 


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Elliot King's curator insight, April 28, 2015 5:09 PM

Could be a game-changer in so many ways.

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MOOCs and Meetups Together Make for Better Learning

MOOCs and Meetups Together Make for Better Learning | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it

Everyday, thousands of students around the world perch themselves in front of computer screens in homes, libraries, coffee shops, and Internet cafes to take a massive open online course (MOOC).


Via SusanBat , Miloš Bajčetić, Luciana Viter, Chris Carter, Susanna Sancassani
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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 22, 2015 8:36 PM

Right! It is within the interpersonal relationships that most of us find the motivation to complete a long, challenging task.

Christa Meenan's curator insight, April 23, 2015 9:14 AM

While highlighting the obvious benefits of MOOCs for self-motivated individuals, this aricle does a nice job of also explaining the importance of face-to-face interaction with the instructor for many students to succeed.  Blending MOOCs with other forms of delivery may be a way for MOOCs to move forward with lower dropout rates.

Susanna Sancassani's curator insight, April 28, 2015 2:59 AM

Il MOOC si fa blended...

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The Power of "I Don't Know"

The Power of "I Don't Know" | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it

Via Susanna Sancassani
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Susanna Sancassani's curator insight, November 12, 2014 2:47 AM

"The role of teaching has evolved. No longer are we the carriers of knowledge, giving it to students and assessing if they can repeat facts successfully. We are, instead, tasked with teaching students how to find answers themselves" 

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Impacts of MOOCs on Higher Education

Impacts of MOOCs on Higher Education | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
An international group of higher education institutions—including UT Arlington, Stanford University, Hong Kong University and Davidson College—convened by learning researcher and theorist George Siemens gathered last week to explore the impacts of MOOCs on higher education (full list of participating institutions below).

The takeaway? Higher education is going digital, responding to the architecture of knowledge in a digital age, and MOOCs, while heavily criticized, have proven a much-needed catalyst for the development of progressive programs that respond to the changing world.

After sharing challenges, key innovations and general impacts, we were collectively awed by our similarities. Sure, Harvard and Stanford have larger budgets and teams, and the Texas system is, well, a system, while Davidson College enrolls a little under 2,000 students; yet, these fundamentally different institutions voiced similar challenges in their transitions to digital environments.

During a wide-ranging, engaging conversation, participants focused on themes that have to do with organizational change, the state of higher education, and what it is we want our purpose to be—collectively—over the coming years.

Here are a few of the effects MOOCs have had on our colleges or universities:

Increased institutional consciousness around the future of digital. Not surprisingly, the most prevalent topic of conversation was that our institutions are increasingly thinking, debating and dreaming about the role of MOOCs—and digital education more broadly—in defining future models of higher education. Four years ago, many of our faculty senates and upper level administrations infrequently engaged deeply with questions pertaining to the higher education in the digital era. Today, those conversations populate strategy documents, capital campaign materials, and inform decision-making and exchanges between students, staff and faculty on a daily basis.
Elevated appreciation for the profession of teaching. Research occupies a place of privilege at universities, but MOOCs have helped focus attention on the teaching and learning process on our campuses. Faculty creating MOOCs often emerge from the experience with a newfound appreciation, and understanding, of the tremendously rich body of research on course design and learning science. At one represented institution, a faculty member was moved to a tenure track role after teaching a successful MOOC. At another, the university president suggested that teaching a MOOC could be at least as important as publishing in “Nature” (if not more). On multiple campuses, creating MOOCs gave way to experiments with blended learning, a well-researched strategy for improving active learning in residential courses.
Team-based course design. Creating MOOCs requires people across the institution to collaborate in ways not native to higher education. Instructional designers, software developers, learning researchers, librarians and videographers team up with faculty (the domain experts) to create each MOOC. The team-based approach to developing learning environments allows each specialist to contribute their expertise. For many of us, the move from teaching as a solo endeavor to a community-based effort has been rewarding, capacity building, and ultimately opened our minds to ways to apply team-based approaches to environments beyond MOOCs.
Privileging institutional capacity building over outsourcing. Many of the represented institutions were members of the edX Consortium, and joined the consortium primarily because of edx’s focus on building each institution’s capacity to create and learn and reflect in a community of peers. Collectively, our experiences with MOOCs are building our capacity to conceptualize and drive subsequent change. To shape—rather than be shaped—by the digital era.
Creation of new space for experimentation. Our group widely acknowledged institutional challenges, such as shared governance and extended decision making cycles, which, while having many important benefits, often render the institutions slower to experiment and change. Many participants found that the organizational structures designed around MOOC creation provided safe spaces for experimentation and innovation in teaching and learning. Separated from traditional organizational process and structures—and coupled with the team-based approach—teams at our institutions have begun to question inherited assumptions about higher education. It’s something about MOOCs, we decided, that gives us permission to imagine what’s possible along each vertical of the acronym—the massive, the open, and the online (or, digital). The MOOC hype may be dying, but its momentum has paved the way for increased experimentation with thoughtful and bold ideas for higher education in a digital era.

As we enter fully into the knowledge age, the relevance of universities will only increase, provided that faculty and leaders are able to create a compelling vision for higher education that serves the needs of all learners in society. The specific tools, services and experiences of a traditional higher education will continue to be unbundled by a range of companies and startups. It’s up to colleges and universities—cornerstones of democracy—to rebundle and re-integrate these new elements in a way that embodies the high ideals of education with the practical life-long learning needs of individuals.

The early impacts of MOOCs on higher education are a sign that this transition is difficult, but entirely possible. As the next waves of hype impact universities, likely in the form of adaptive learning and competency based education, the systems that are successful will be those that address the full spectrum of learning: liberal arts, vocational and life-long.

(Full list of participating institutions: University of Texas at Arlington, Cornell University, Hong Kong University, Davidson College, Stanford University, Harvard University, Colgate University, Georgetown University, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, and Athabasca University.)
Allison Dulin Salisbury works in the President's Office at Davidson College on Special Projects (new partnerships and initiatives around entrepreneurship, K12 education, and education technology.)
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Why Self-Education Is Crucial For Your Career: From Preparation To Using Free Online Courses

Why Self-Education Is Crucial For Your Career: From Preparation To Using Free Online Courses | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Self-education can sometimes help you immensely when you want to apply real world knowledge to a career. While others might say that a university education

Via Sue Beckingham
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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 29, 2014 5:43 AM

Why Self-Education Is Crucial For Your Career: From Preparation To Using Free Online Courses

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The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester

 

Abstract

This paper reports on an observation of 70 university students’ use of their personal social network site (SNS), Facebook, over a 22-week university study period. The study sought to determine the extent that university students use their personal SNSs to support learning by exploring frequencies of academic-related content and topics being discussed. The findings reported in the paper reveal that students used their personal SNSs to discuss academic-related topics, particularly to share experiences about doing work or procrastinating, course content and grades. Mapping academic-related activity frequencies over the 22 weeks illustrated that around certain points in the academic calendar, particularly times when students’ assignments or exams were nearing, academic activity increased, suggesting that SNSs may play an important role in a students’ academic experience.

The findings suggest that many students today may be leaving traces of their academic journey online and that academics should be aware that these interactions may also exist in their own students’ online social spaces. This study offers opportunities for future research, particularly research which seeks to determine differences between individuals’ academic activity, the extent that intensive SNSs use supports or distracts students from learning, as well as the extent to which universities should or can harness SNSs to improve the student experience.

Keywords: informal learning; social networking; Facebook; university students; social network sites


Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
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Claire Brooks's curator insight, September 7, 2014 3:33 AM

remember to connect to Naomi Barnes

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 8, 2014 8:25 AM

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

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Coursera for Your Career: 4 Tips to Prep for Course Success

Coursera for Your Career: 4 Tips to Prep for Course Success | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
In the last installment of Coursera for Your Career, “Find the Best Course for Your Professional Development and Advancement”, we walked you through the process of navigating Coursera’s course catalog...
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Learn Linux with This Free edX Course from the Linux Foundation

Learn Linux with This Free edX Course from the Linux Foundation | Mooc's METID | Scoop.it
Intro to Linux is normally a $2,400 course from the Linux Foundation, but it's being offered for free now on edX. If you've ever wanted to learn how to use the open source operating system, there's no better time than now.
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