MOOC and the Future of Education
72 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Learning in the 21st century
Scoop.it!

Open University: Online Learning Must Be Collaborative, Social

Open University: Online Learning Must Be Collaborative, Social | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
The future of online education must include more social, collaborative contact among students and professors, suggests an Open University report.

Via Nik Peachey, stephane canonne
more...
Алла Миргородская's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:50 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Татьяна Фокина's curator insight, December 2, 2014 2:07 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

tom cockburn's curator insight, December 24, 2014 6:21 AM

I agree about collaboration, but have already voiced concerns about collusion and cheating which I regard as cheating and as disadvantaging those who are learning subject matter as well as potentially causing others problems if a person is thereby employed in a role for which they are incapable

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Learning in the 21st century
Scoop.it!

Blended Learning Model Definitions | Christensen Institute

Blended Learning Model Definitions | Christensen Institute | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

The definition of blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns:

(1) at least in part through online learning, with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace;

(2) at least in part in a supervised brick-and-mortar location away from home;

(3) and the modalities along each student’s learning path within a course or subject are connected to provide an integrated learning experience.

 


Via Peter B. Sloep, stephane canonne
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 12, 2014 3:41 PM

The focus of these scoop.it pages is networked learning. As the above definition points out, online learning is part and parcel of blended learning experiences. In some cases, the online part is of a social nature, thereby qualifying it as a form of networked learning. Apart from that, next to MOOCs blended learning is another attempt at marrying the online and the offline in learning. Although the terminology used is different, although the intentions are different (for sure if it concerns xMOOCs), there are a lot of similarities worth drawing attention to. This is particularly so since the various forms of blended learning discussed in this short scoop offer useful food for thought for those interested in furthering the evolution of MOOCs. I am thinking in particular of the à-la-carte model and the enriched-virtual model. Also, the classification is unlikely to be exhaustive and therefore provides food for the imaginative thinker.

 @pbsloep

Milena Bobeva's curator insight, April 25, 2014 8:28 AM

The link above is no longer available, but the full details are publishes in the following paper: 
http://www.christenseninstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Is-K-12-Blended-Learning-Disruptive.pdf

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Learning in the 21st century
Scoop.it!

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

Via mjonesED, stephane canonne
more...
Anne-Maree Johnson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 8:52 PM

isual guide to critical thinking. print or post to share with students

 

Charlotte Walters's curator insight, April 11, 2014 8:24 AM

Hello, Year 9! 

Here is an excellent resource regarding questions that a critical thinker asks whilst reading. I believe this will be incredibly useful for you as you develop your chapter summary for chapter four of The Outsiders which is due at the end of this week. Remember - you can present your chapter summary in any way you wish - a story board, a mind map, a Prezi, a short multimedia presentation, whatever takes your fancy. 

As a critical thinker, you will need to develop the skills to read between the lines of what the author (in this case, S. E. Hinton) is describing through the text. This infographic provides you with some questions to help you get into the role of a critical thinker, and get you started on your project.  

Jackie Gil's curator insight, May 14, 2014 12:43 PM

Con tanta información a nuestro alrededor es fundamental que aprendamos a cuestionar nuestros hallazgos y nuestras propias ideas.

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Learning in the 21st century
Scoop.it!

How Technology Trends Have Influenced the Classroom

How Technology Trends Have Influenced the Classroom | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
Teachers all over America are faced with this challenge of keeping students engaged in the classroom when their world outside of school is one of constant engagement and stimulation. Knowing the world outside of our institutional walls is only one step in addressing modern learning styles. How to act and adjust schools today is the next step in making the classroom of today ready for tomorrow.

Via Nik Peachey, stephane canonne
more...
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, March 19, 2014 3:17 AM

Worth reading... we need to bridge that gap for good!!

Professor Jill Jameson's curator insight, March 21, 2014 6:06 AM

Interesting insights, American-based, but applicable worldwide. 

Serge Dielens * Phygital Marketing Communication expert @ EdgeCommunication.be *'s curator insight, March 23, 2014 6:20 AM

L'école est-elle (loin-très loin-trop loin) à la traîne en Belgique?

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Learning in the 21st century
Scoop.it!

Comment apprendre à apprendre ?

Comment apprendre à apprendre ? | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

François Taddéi (Wikipédia, @francoistaddei) est biologiste de formation. Il est le cofondateur duCentre de recherche interdisciplinaire (CRI). Sur la scène des Entretiens du Nouveau Monde industriel, ce promoteur de l’interdisciplinarité est venu évoquer son obsession : comment innover dans l’éducation, comment apprendre à apprendre…

Quand Garry Kasparov a perdu contre Deep Blue, The Economist titrait “si votre métier ressemble aux échecs, il faut vous préparer à changer de métier”. L’évolution du jeu d’échec est devenue une métaphore du futur, estime François Taddéi. Après avoir perdu contre Deep Blue, Kasparov s’est lancé dans le jeu d’échec avancé, c’est à dire une modalité où homme et machine jouent ensemble et pour Kasparov, les sessions de jeu sont devenues beaucoup plus intéressantes. Son plus célèbre adversaire, Karpov a également tenté une partie seul contre le reste du monde, qu’il a largement dominé. Mais dans une version améliorée de cette partie, où des éditeurs humains sélectionnaient parmi tous les coups que proposaient des centaines de joueurs d’échecs le meilleur coup, Kasparov a gagné mais a été impressionné. Pour lui, c’était là la plus intéressante partie qu’il ait jamais jouée, preuve qu’un collectif d’humain, organisé par une machine pouvait largement mettre en défaut l’expert…


Via Laurent Blanquer, stephane canonne
more...
InforJeunes Arlon's curator insight, January 21, 2014 5:41 AM

“Aucun d’entre nous n’est plus intelligent que l’ensemble d’entre nous”, rappelle avec modestie le chercheur Frédéric Taddéi. L’essentiel est dans l’ouverture.

Dinah Galligo's curator insight, January 24, 2014 6:15 AM

C'est l'essentiel en pédagogie ....

Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

MOOC : la France prend la révolution en marche - InformatiqueNews

MOOC : la France prend la révolution en marche - InformatiqueNews | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
MOOC : la France prend la révolution en marche InformatiqueNews Udacity comme Coursera, deux start-up qui offrent des Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC), ont été créées par des anciens enseignants de Stanford, début 2012, et suivies par Harvard et...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

Clayton Christensen: Why online education is ready for disruption, now.

Clayton Christensen: Why online education is ready for disruption, now. | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

Excerpts:

 

According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, approximately 5.6 million students took at least one web-based class during the fall 2009 semester, which marked a 21% growth from the previous year. The Harvard Business School Review points out that this figure is up from 45,000 in 2000 and experts predict that online education could reach 14 million in 2014.

But with its tremendous growth, online education has brought up much debate between deans, provosts and faculty. Teachers worry that online education is going to take their jobs away. There’s fear on all sides about maintaining quality control. And how do you know that the student at the other end of the computer is really doing what they’re supposed to be doing? 

 

Christensen is well-known for his academic work on disruptive innovations. And recently, he’s become a key figure in the online learning community with his new book: Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns that he co-authored with Michael Horn. The two also co-founded Innosight Institute, a nonprofit think tank that studies education and innovation.

 

This week, I caught up with Christensen to ask him, “Do you think education is finally ready for the Internet?” “I absolutely do. I think that not only are we ready but adoption is occurring at a faster rate than we had thought… We believe that by the year 2019 half of all classes for grades K-12 will be taught online… The rise of online learning carries with it an unprecedented opportunity to transform the schooling system into a student-centric one that can affordably customize for different student needs by allowing all students to learn at their appropriate pace and path, thereby allowing each student to realize his or her fullest potential….”

 

So, realistically, online learning IS disrupting the teaching profession. We will still need teachers but the skills necessary for success as a teacher will be very different in the classroom that Christensen envisions than in the one the teachers’ unions are comfortable with. In the early 19th century, British textile artisans protested the Industrial Revolution with the anti-technology “Luddite movement.” They believed mechanized looms would replace them and make their jobs obsolete. They were right.

 

With the rise of online education, the future of learning will be a student-paced culture as opposed to our current forms of custodial education, which are teacher-based. Students can hold down a job while working on their Masters. Children in unstable homes can ask for help online instead of working it out on their own. Anyone can “go back to school” without having to really go anywhere. With online education, learning never has to end. And certain online education models actually have the potential to reduce the costs of both delivering education for the university and the cost of tuition for the student.

Human beings with the best education tend to do the best in the marketplace. “I think it will not be long before people will see that those who took their education online will have learned it better than people who got it in the classroom, and that’s exciting,” says Christensen.

The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise — with the occasion.

–Abraham Lincoln, December 1, 1862

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

Scoop.it Pros: Laura Brown on curation and the display of information

Scoop.it Pros: Laura Brown on curation and the display of information | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
Being a content curator is all about displaying information. We don't create the content, we display it. We share it - and people read it. But, first you have to display it. There are several skills involved in displaying content.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Ideas for entrepreneurs
Scoop.it!

Survivorship Bias

Survivorship Bias | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

The Misconception: You should focus on the successful if you wish to become successful.


Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, July 1, 2013 10:37 PM

This is a long but great and beautifully written post by David McRaney. His story starts with the way the U.S. applied statistics to win the war through the example of measures taken to augment the odds of survival of bombers. 


The Maths geniuses of what was not yet "Big Data" came out with many recommendations that proved essential, one of which being to fight survival bias. If - like WWII Air Force officers - you had observed that most bombers returning from missions over Germany were crippled with bullets holes along the wings, around the tail gunner, and down the center of the body, where would you recommend adding protection?


If the answer's not trivial to you (or even if it is), read this.


And as McRaney extrapolates, this also explains why "All the Startup Advice You Read is Wrong" as Twitter co-founder Ev wrote.

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from MBA in Europe
Scoop.it!

Come the Revolution

Come the Revolution | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
Through ventures like Coursera, world-class learning is coming at bargain-basement prices.

 

Welcome to the college education revolution. Big breakthroughs happen when what is suddenly possible meets what is desperately necessary. The costs of getting a college degree have been rising faster than those of health care, so the need to provide low-cost, quality higher education is more acute than ever. At the same time, in a knowledge economy, getting a higher-education degree is more vital than ever. And thanks to the spread of high-speed wireless technology, high-speed Internet, smartphones, Facebook, the cloud and tablet computers, the world has gone from connected to hyperconnected in just seven years. Finally, a generation that has grown up on these technologies is increasingly comfortable learning and interacting with professors through online platforms.

 

Private companies, like Phoenix, have been offering online degrees for a fee for years. And schools like M.I.T. and Stanford have been offering lectures for free online. Coursera is the next step: building an interactive platform that will allow the best schools in the world to not only offer a wide range of free course lectures online, but also a system of testing, grading, student-to-student help and awarding certificates of completion of a course for under $100. (Sounds like a good deal. Tuition at the real-life Stanford is over $40,000 a year.) Coursera is starting with 40 courses online — from computing to the humanities — offered by professors from Stanford, Princeton, Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania.

 

“The universities produce and own the content, and we are the platform that hosts and streams it,” explained Daphne Koller, a Stanford computer science professor who founded Coursera with Ng after seeing tens of thousands of students following their free Stanford lectures online. “We will also be working with employers to connect students — only with their consent — with job opportunities that are appropriate to their newly acquired skills. So, for instance, a biomedical company looking for someone with programming and computational biology skills might ask us for students who did well in our courses on cloud computing and genomics. It is great for employers and employees — and it enables someone with a less traditional education to get the credentials to open up these opportunities.”

 

M.I.T., Harvard and private companies, like Udacity, are creating similar platforms. In five years this will be a huge industry.

 

While the lectures are in English, students have been forming study groups in their own countries to help one another. The biggest enrollments are from the United States, Britain, Russia, India and Brazil. “One Iranian student e-mailed to say he found a way to download the class videos and was burning them onto CDs and circulating them,” Ng said last Thursday. “We just broke a million enrollments.”

 

To make learning easier, Coursera chops up its lectures into short segments and offers online quizzes, which can be auto-graded, to cover each new idea. It operates on the honor system but is building tools to reduce cheating.

 

These top-quality learning platforms could enable budget-strained community colleges in America to “flip” their classrooms. That is, download the world’s best lecturers on any subject and let their own professors concentrate on working face-to-face with students. Says Koller: “It will allow people who lack access to world-class learning — because of financial, geographic or time constraints — to have an opportunity to make a better life for themselves and their families.”

 

When you consider how many problems around the world are attributable to the lack of education, that is very good news. Let the revolution begin.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

La face cachée des Moocs - Massive Open Online Courses - Finyear.com

La face cachée des Moocs - Massive Open Online Courses - Finyear.com | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
La face cachée des Moocs - Massive Open Online Courses
Finyear.com
La face cachée des Moocs - Massive Open Online Courses ...
Benoit Arnaud's insight:

#MOOC

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

SPOC vs MOOC : quelles différences ? - Studyrama

SPOC vs MOOC : quelles différences ? - Studyrama | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
SPOC vs MOOC : quelles différences ? Studyrama Les SPOC, comme leur nom l'indique, sont un peu le modèle réduit des MOOC (ou CLOM en français, soit Cours en ligne ouverts et massifs) : alors que les MOOC sont ouverts au plus grand nombre, les SPOC...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

Un MOOC francophone gratuit pour réviser le bac 2014 ! - digiSchool média

Un MOOC francophone gratuit pour réviser le bac 2014 ! - digiSchool média | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
digiSchool média
Un MOOC francophone gratuit pour réviser le bac 2014 !
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from MBA Rankings
Scoop.it!

Unlocking the B-School Entrepreneur Within

Unlocking the B-School Entrepreneur Within | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
The emerging science of "neuro-entrepreneurship" holds promise for business schools seeking better ways to help students on the path to startups (Unlocking the B-School Entrepreneur Within http://t.co/GEiZ04v5...

Via MBA Rankings
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Web 3.0 and Trends
Scoop.it!

Curation & The Future of Publishing

Curation & The Future of Publishing | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
How ideas curation is making the Web smarter.

Via Thomas Faltin, Benoit Arnaud
more...
Benoit Arnaud's curator insight, October 20, 2013 11:20 AM

Social Curation to replace social networks? #SMM

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Courants technos
Scoop.it!

Solutions vidéos gratuites pour vos cours en ligne

Solutions vidéos gratuites pour vos cours en ligne | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it

Vous rêvez de produire des cours en ligne aussi sophistiqués, techniquement parlant, que les MOOCs des grandes universités ? Les deux applications que nous avons testées vous permettront de créer des cours vidéos et des démonstrations animées.


Via Thot - Cursus
more...
Christiane DUPUY's curator insight, January 20, 2014 12:42 PM

Pour changer des animations PPT !

Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

Military leaders need business education, retired general tells UVa gathering

Military leaders need business education, retired general tells UVa gathering | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
Encouraging military leaders to use civilian business tactics would simultaneously improve America’s economy and the operations of the armed forces, said a former top U.S. Air Force officer in a recent speech at the University of Virginia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
The communication of knowledge and ideas is intrinsic to the human condition. Our earliest ancestors had a rich oral tradition, through which they passed on what they knew about the world, often across great distances.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benoit Arnaud
Scoop.it!

L'éducation en ligne, maintenant ou jamais - Le Point

L'éducation en ligne, maintenant ou jamais - Le Point | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
L'éducation en ligne, maintenant ou jamais
Le Point
L'éducation jouera un rôle clé dans l'économie de la connaissance du XXIe siècle. ...
Benoit Arnaud's insight:

Pas si simple!...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from Ideas for entrepreneurs
Scoop.it!

The Startup Universe: awesome data visualization

The Startup Universe: awesome data visualization | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
Uncover new stories and make sense of the complex relationships between startups, founders and Venture Capitalists with Visually's Startup Universe

Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, July 12, 2013 3:48 PM

Pretty awesome data visualization by Visual.ly based on CrunchFund data. Would love to see exits in there too but gives a reallly interesting view of the VC/Startup/Founders graphs.

Ivan Berlocher's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:46 AM

Fantastic Visualization!

Rescooped by Benoit Arnaud from MBA in Europe
Scoop.it!

The rise of online education

The rise of online education | MOOC and the Future of Education | Scoop.it
OPINION | Authors Christensen and Horn outline the future classroom.

 

Excerpts:

 

For the first time in roughly a century—since the transition from the one-room schoolhouse to the classroom- and age-based school—a dramatic change in the basic way we structure our educational system is afoot. Online learning is on the rise in the nation’s public schools. In the year 2000, roughly 45,000 K-12 students took an online course. In 2010, roughly 4 million did, according to Ambient Insight. And, according to our projections, 50 percent of all high school courses will be taken online by 2019—the vast majority of them in blended-learning school environments with teachers, which will fundamentally move learning beyond the four walls and traditional arrangement of today’s all-too-familiar classroom.

 

As a disruptive innovation—an innovation that transforms a sector from one that was previously complicated and expensive into one that is far simpler and more affordable—the rise of online learning carries with it an unprecedented opportunity to transform the schooling system into a student-centric one that can affordably customize for different student needs by allowing all students to learn at their appropriate pace and path, thereby allowing each student to realize her fullest potential.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.