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Never forget a Face(book): Memory for Online Posts Beats Faces and Books

Never forget a Face(book): Memory for Online Posts Beats Faces and Books | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Study finds that memories favor natural, spontaneous writing over polished, edited content, and could have wide implications.
Gina Stepp's insight:

This study is worth pulling up from the archives. My favorite line in this one: "Our minds may better take in, store, and bring forth information gained from online posts because they are in what the researchers call 'mind-ready' formats—i.e., they are spontaneous, unedited and closer to natural speech."

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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Science News
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Why 'Faking' Attraction Leads to Real Love

Why 'Faking' Attraction Leads to Real Love | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Pretending that you find someone attractive increases your susceptibility to their charms and heightens your chances of truly falling in love with them, according to new relationship research.

 

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Serving and Leadership
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Is Humility the Greatest Virtue?

Is Humility the Greatest Virtue? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

New psychological research shows a clear link between humility, as a personality characteristic, and helping, an action one does for the benefit of others.

 

Researchers discovered that humility is strongly associated with a host of positive values, including reliable friendship, good working habits and generosity. Evolutionary psychologists say there's good reason for that: "Humble people will be more helpful to the group because a trait that involves subsuming one’s own needs to those of others is only likely to be preserved in a species in which cooperation is necessary for survival." Humans, who generally require the help of others in thriving or raising children, are probably one such species.


More information can be found at the University of Maine Web site: http://umaine.edu/news/blog/2012/01/03/personality-study-links-humility-helpfulness/


Via Sakis Koukouvis, donhornsby
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Developmental Psychology
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At What Age Do Babies Stop Being Irresistibly Adorable? | Psychology Today

At What Age Do Babies Stop Being Irresistibly Adorable? | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Babies are universally adorable --until a certain age By Jena Pincott...

Via Ruth Grayberg
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Computer system identifies liars

Computer system identifies liars | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
buffalo.edu - Inspired by the work of psychologists who study the human face for clues that someone is telling a high-stakes lie, UB computer scientists are exploring whether machines can also read the visual cues that give away deceit.
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Science News
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Leave It to Science: Does It Pay to Be Beautiful?

Leave It to Science: Does It Pay to Be Beautiful? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

According to a recent survey of two thousand women, a staggering 25 percent would rather win America’s Next Top Model than a Nobel Prize. Picking beauty over brains might be a bit shallow, but is it also a bad choice? In other words: is being attractive a blessing or a curse?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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How Our Brains Make Memories

How Our Brains Make Memories | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Surprising new research about the act of remembering may help people with post-traumatic stress disorder.


Via Seth Capo
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Shyness study examines how human brain adapts to stimuli

Shyness study examines how human brain adapts to stimuli | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain, new research finds. In fMRI studies, everyone responds similarly to unfamiliar faces, but non-shy people habituate as faces become familiar. Shy people, on the other hand, do not. Familiar faces trigger the same brain response as unfamiliar faces.

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Ten Ways Your Local Grocery Store Hijacks Your Brain | Psychology Today

Ten Ways Your Local Grocery Store Hijacks Your Brain | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

While these examples provide a source of anecdote and amusement, they really do give new meaning to the Latin phrase "Caveat Emptor," or "Let the Buyer Beware."

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Broken Hearts Really Hurt - Association for Psychological Science

Broken Hearts Really Hurt - Association for Psychological Science | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

“Broken-hearted” isn’t just a metaphor—social pain and physical pain have a lot in common, according to Naomi Eisenberger of the University of Califiornia-Los Angeles. Physical pain and social pain are processed in some of the same regions of the brain.

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Real Love or a Fantasy Bond: The Appeal of the Twilight Saga | Psychalive

Real Love or a Fantasy Bond: The Appeal of the Twilight Saga | Psychalive | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Unlike the immortal Edward Cullen, our partners can neither save nor protect us from inevitabilities like our past, our humanity, or our mortality. Is this the model of love we want our kids to strive for? Becoming vulnerable to love is one thing, but losing oneself in fantasy is another.

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A Refined Formula to Predict Doom in Celebrity Marriages

A Refined Formula to Predict Doom in Celebrity Marriages | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

How the Sundem-Tierney celebrity-marriage prediction equation measured up in its five years, and how it is being tweaked for added accuracy. One thing's for sure: tabloid fame means trouble.

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When rats are as smart as humans

When rats are as smart as humans | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
In a battle of wits, humans and rats are way more evenly matched than you'd think. While we obviously have an advantage in overall intelligence, our ability to read situations and make decisions is actually no better than a rat's.
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Under Construction
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Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture?

Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

What role do early childhood experiences in nearby nature play in the formation of brain architecture? It’s time for science to ask that question.

 

In January, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof reported on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ “landmark warning that toxic stress can harm children for life.” This was, he wrote, a “’policy statement’ from the premier association of pediatricians, based on two decades of scientific research,” and he added that the statement “has revolutionary implications for medicine and for how we can more effectively chip away at poverty and crime.”

 

From conception through early childhood, brain architecture is particularly malleable and influenced by environment and relationships with primary caregivers, including toxic stress caused by abuse or chronic neglect. By interfering with healthy brain development, such stress can undermine the cognitive skills and health of a child, leading to learning difficulty and behavior problems, as well as psychological and behavior problems, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other physical ailments later in life.


Via Daniel House, Martin Daumiller, Alice Ruxton Abler, Rachelle Capo
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Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, August 3, 2012 3:42 PM
Many thanks for the rescoop!
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Advertising: Why we think sexy men are men and sexy women are objects - Association for Psychological Science

Advertising: Why we think sexy men are men and sexy women are objects - Association for Psychological Science | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Society has grown accustomed to depictions of scantily clad women being used to sell everything from hamburgers to SUVs, now a study has found that at a basic cognitive level, both men and women see images of sexy women’s bodies as objects, while sexy-looking men are viewed as people.

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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Mom Ed
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Evidence shows that anti-depressants likely do more harm than good, researchers find

Evidence shows that anti-depressants likely do more harm than good, researchers find | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Commonly prescribed anti-depressants appear to be doing patients more harm than good, say researchers who have published a paper examining the impact of the medications on the entire body.

 

What the researchers found is that anti-depressants have negative health effects on all processes normally regulated by serotonin.

[Another reason to work hard at building psychological resilience.]


Via Sakis Koukouvis, David Hulme, Linda Hutchison
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Where Have All the Neurotics Gone?

Where Have All the Neurotics Gone? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

The restless, grumbling, needy presence that once functioned in the collective mind as an inner voice that hedged against excessive optimism is slipping into the past. Some of the reasons that “neurotic” has fallen out of colloquial usage are obvious. Freudian analysis lost its hold on the common consciousness, as well as in psychiatry, and some of Freud’s language lost its power. But there's more . . . 

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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Insight and Understanding
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The Psychopath Test | This American Life

The Psychopath Test | This American Life | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

This American Life: "Recently we heard about this test that could determine if someone was a psychopath. So, naturally, our staff decided to take it. This week we hear the results. Plus Jon Ronson asks the question: is this man a psychopath?"

 

Link to transcript, though I strongly recommend listening over reading when it comes to This American Life:  http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/436/transcript

 

(Note: Even though This American Life has only recently heard about the test, the PCL-R has actually been around a good long while. See the author's site for cautions, etc: http://www.hare.org/scales/pclr.html)


Via Seth Capo
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Seth Capo's comment, March 27, 2012 12:24 PM
Some of problems you raised are addressed throughout the episode--in particular, the use of the PCL-R in a criminal justice context and the inherent subjectivity involved in rating responses. I hope you enjoy it, Gina.
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 12:31 PM
I look forward to listening to this, although one can't help but cringe when people start playing office games with diagnostic tests and/or relying on them for life-and-death decisions. The PCL-R can be especially problematic as a parlor game, because there's so much dissension over how to classify and/or reclassify the current disorders impacted by the traits it identifies. The APA doesn't list psychopathy as a disorder in the current diagnostic manual--it's really considered a set of traits associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder, more than a separate disorder at this point, but Robert Hare (who developed the test) would like to see it included in the next revised version of the DSM. The manual used by the WHO lists "dissocial personality disorder" which is seen as basically the same thing as psychopathy or sociopathy. But the APA doesn't quite see antisocial personality as perfectly synonymous. Still~ I expect this will be interesting to listen to~
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 1:23 PM
Okay. I took the quick way out and read the transcript. :) A much more engaging way of learning about the PCL-R than the way I had to do it in school. But I also thought they did a good job making the point about its limitations. I did have a good chuckle at the end.
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Smiling through the tears: Study shows how tearjerkers make people happier

Smiling through the tears: Study shows how tearjerkers make people happier | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Tragedy movies like “Titanic” deliver what may seem to be an unlikely benefit: what seems like a negative experience -- watching a sad story -- made people happier by bringing attention to some positive aspects in their own lives.

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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Creativity & Decision-Making
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Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull | TIME Ideas | TIME.com

Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull | TIME Ideas | TIME.com | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Brrriiinnng. The alarm clock buzzes in another hectic weekday morning. You leap out of bed, rush into the shower, into your clothes and out the door with barely a moment to think. A stressful commute gets your blood pressure climbing.

 

Everything about the way we start our day runs counter to the best conditions for thinking creatively

 


Via Katherine Stevens
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 22, 2012 10:50 AM
I love the last line: "Laughing babies and a double latte: now that’s a way to start the day."

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Old Age and Treachery: How older workers outperform their younger colleagues

Old Age and Treachery: How older workers outperform their younger colleagues | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Baltes and others distinguish between 'pragmatics'—strategies used—and 'mechanics'—the physical infrastructure that controls the ability to do the task. Younger people typically have stronger and more intact mechanical systems, but lack the more sophisticated pragmatics painstakingly acquired through expert practice. 
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from The insanity within our normality.
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Is Anger Normal or is it Total Insanity?

Is Anger Normal or is it Total Insanity? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

We all freak out from time to time... Are we normal? AS


Via Academic Sciences
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Moral Education
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Suppressing Feelings of Compassion Makes People Feel Less Moral

It’s normal to not always act on your sense of compassion—for example, by walking past a beggar on the street without giving them any money. Maybe you want to save your money or avoid engaging with a homeless person. But even if suppressing compassion avoids these costs, it may carry a personal cost of its own, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. After people suppress compassionate feelings, an experiment shows, they lose a bit of their commitment to morality.


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Sarantis Chelmis
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Grudges often hurt you more than co-worker

Grudges often hurt you more than co-worker | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Grudges can take on a terribly fierce hold. And they're until met head on, they stick to you like chewing gum on the bottom of your shoe.
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Scientists tap the cognitive genius of tots to make computers smarter

Scientists tap the cognitive genius of tots to make computers smarter | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
People often wonder if computers make children smarter. Scientists are now asking the reverse question: Can children make computers smarter? It appears so.
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