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Inside the Neurotic Mind - Association for Psychological Science

Inside the Neurotic Mind - Association for Psychological Science | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

In the 1990s, David H. Barlow (professor of psychology and psychiatry at Boston University and founder of the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders) and colleague Timothy Brown began a closer study of the role neuroticism played in the mood and anxiety disorders found in their patients. What they discovered was that negative affect contributed substantially to all the disorders in the clinic — in particular generalized anxiety disorder and depression. The findings have since been replicated many times, Barlow said.

 

Today it is believed that two other factors play a key role in shaping the neurotic temperament. The first is that people predisposed to this behavior don’t handle intense emotions well. One study conducted a few years ago confirmed that patients in Barlow’s clinic found emotions less acceptable than well-matched participants outside the clinic and typically tried to suppress them.

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» Psychological Factors Can Influence Kids’ Chest Pain - Psych Central News

» Psychological Factors Can Influence Kids’ Chest Pain  - Psych Central News | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

A new study finds psychological factors can have as much -- or more -- impact on pediatric chest pain as physical ones.

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Avatars may help children with social anxiety ... - Health Centers

Avatars may help children with social anxiety ... - Health Centers | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
The National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, provided a $500000 grant to fund the development of the software and a 12-week study that will begin this summer. Researchers at the University of Central Florida’s Anxiety Disorders Clinic and the Atlanta-based company Virtually Better want to give more children with social anxiety the practice they need to become comfortable in social situations. They have developed a new, one-of-a-kind computer simulation program that enables children to interact with avatars playing the roles of classmates, teachers and a principal.




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Excessive worrying may be as beneficial to human survival as intelligence

Excessive worrying may be as beneficial to human survival as intelligence | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Worrying may have developed along with intelligence as a beneficial trait, according to scientists. "While excessive worry is generally seen as a negative trait and high intelligence as a positive one, worry may cause our species to avoid dangerous situations, regardless of how remote a possibility they may be," said Dr. Coplan. "In essence, worry may make people 'take no chances,' and such people may have higher survival rates. Thus, like intelligence, worry may confer a benefit upon the species."

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Cognitive behaviour therapy improves quality of life in children with asthma and anxiety

Cognitive behaviour therapy improves quality of life in children with asthma and anxiety | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Researchers have found that a programme of cognitive behaviour therapy delivered by nurses to children who had asthma and anxiety improved the children's quality of life scores and reduced the risk of escalation of treatment.

 

Levels of anxiety and hyperventilation in children with asthma fell and their quality of life improved after a course of behaviour therapy from a nurse-led clinic, research has found.

 

The therapy included techniques such as mindfulness, where children were encouraged to concentrate on the present moment, rather than worry about what might happen or what has happened before.

 

Basic cognitive restructuring was also used, which involved looking at recurring detrimental thoughts or anxieties experienced by the children and encouraging them to replace them with more positive thoughts. Some of the thoughts children said might increase their anxiety were: 'I don't like people watching me take my inhaler' and 'the ambulance might not come in time'.

 

Writing in the journal Nursing Children and Young People, the researchers said early identification of the role of anxiety in asthma could prevent unnecessary escalation of treatment, for example overuse of oral steroids, which has side effects.

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Hilary J.'s curator insight, February 13, 2014 7:39 PM

The relationship between certain chronic illnesses and increases in anxiety is most evident in young children and adolescents. This young population may not have the life experience or coping mechanisms learned in adulthood to deal with the increase in stress that comes with medical illnesses. In this study, nurses in a hospital used cognitive behavioral techniques to help combat the anxiety that many children with asthma face. These children fear using their inhaler in front of their peers, or worry that the ambulance will not come in time. Nurses given training in CBT used techniques such as mindfulness to help children focus on the present moment and not on what could happen. Additionally, cognitive restructuring was used to replace negative thoughts with positive ones. When nurses and caregivers were able to identify anxiety early in these children, asthma attacks were more often avoided and as such, the use of steroids to control their breathing was decreased resulting in more positive health outcomes. 

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That giant tarantula is terrifying, but I'll touch it: Expressing your emotions can reduce fear

That giant tarantula is terrifying, but I'll touch it: Expressing your emotions can reduce fear | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Can simply describing your feelings at stressful times make you less afraid and less anxious? A new psychology study suggests that labeling your emotions at the precise moment you are confronting what you fear can indeed have that effect.
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Relationship conflicts stress men more than women

Relationship conflicts stress men more than women | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Although both men and women have a physiological response to relationship conflict, the response is much more pronounced in men than in women and involves different attachment factors. Anxiety was a strong predictor for response in men, but in women, only highly avoidant types showed significant cortisol changes. Men in the study who had secure female partners showed the lowest levels of cortisol reactivity, indicating that their partners were helping to regulate their physiological stress levels.

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donhornsby's comment, April 23, 2012 7:04 AM
Thanks Gina. I, for one, can say that this is true. Interesting information.
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» Exercise: Improve Your Mood and Help Repair the Effects of Stress

» Exercise:  Improve Your Mood and Help Repair the Effects of Stress | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

What grandmothers, psychologists and friends have always suggested as an antidote for depression is backed by the research: "Exercise, you'll feel better." Getting active provides a distraction, reduces muscle tension, builds brain resources (increases and balances serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, all important neurotransmitters involved in mood), improves resilience by showing you that you can be effective in controlling anxiety, and breaks the feeling of being trapped and immobilized. The effects can be equal or even better than medication.

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Gina Stepp's comment, April 14, 2012 1:51 PM
Building resilience is not just an antidote for depression and anxiety but a preventative for these issues too.