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Exercise Reorganizes the Brain to Be More Resilient to Stress

Exercise Reorganizes the Brain to Be More Resilient to Stress | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
New study may resolve a discrepancy in research related to the effect of exercise on the brain, explaining why exercise reduces anxiety.
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Expert: Talking to Children About the Connecticut School Shooting

Expert: Talking to Children About the Connecticut School Shooting | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Due to the recent tragic school shooting in Newtown, CT, parents and teachers may be faced with the challenge of discussing this difficult subject with young children.

"These discussions are important, and there are no 'right' or 'wrong' ways to talk with children about such traumatic events,." says David Fassler, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and a practicing child and adolescent psychiatrist in Burlington, Vt.

Most children -- even those exposed to trauma -- are quite resilient.Dr. Fassler offers parents some helpful suggestions for these discussions:
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World Mental Health Day 2012: Got Resilience?

World Mental Health Day 2012: Got Resilience? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Why do some people seem to bounce back from stress while ohers succumb to depression, anxiety or even Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Are some people just better at pulling themselves up by their bootstraps?
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jenscomar's curator insight, June 17, 2013 5:22 PM

It's all summed up in the final paragraph:

"Resilience isn’t something we just “work up” on our own. It is rooted deeply in our first interactions with other human beings—and is watered and fed by the social connections we continue to make throughout our lifespan. Perhaps it’s no accident that we talk about “the milk of human kindness.” After all, just as milk forms the foundation of a baby’s physical health, a parent’s kind and responsive attention forms the foundation of the child’s mental health."

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The science of attachment parenting

The science of attachment parenting | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
What scientific studies reveal about attachment parenting.

 

[Following the curation rules, identifying my own comments-GS: I think what hurts this "cause" is that some in the "movement" are separating it as a "movement," or "cause" or something outside the norm. I get that identifying it as a "movement" may bring attention, but it also antagonizes others. "Attachment parenting" is a name that got "attached" to a common sense, evidence-based understanding. It's not meant to be as regimented as some make it, so please don't be put off by it. Children need the connections that are encouraged by these folks. Seriously. Generations of children that were sent off to boarding school so their parents could freely live their own lives should have taught us that much! How much resilience did their kids grow up with?) Okay. Off my soapbox.]

 

 

 


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Stanford study suggests humans can 'rewire' brains to avoid depression

Stanford study suggests humans can 'rewire' brains to avoid depression | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Stanford psychologists used brain imaging and a video game to help girls teach their brains not to overreact to stress.

The study, which is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, has been under way for less than a year and builds on peer-reviewed experiments examining risk factors for becoming depressed and the family connections of the disease.


Via Alice Ruxton Abler
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 3:02 PM
The new and interesting thing about this is that they've come up with a video intervention. The rewiring of the brain through positive reframing is a long-practiced part of cognitive behavioral therapy, of course--and there is a large body of research in this area. For some other practical tips on rewiring the brain to avoid depression, a Google Scholar search on building resilience will turn up lots of great studies in this same vein. And some articles like this one: http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/depression-trauma-resilience/5816.aspx
Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 3:27 PM
More evidence-base for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.
Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, April 8, 2012 2:48 PM
Many thanks!
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How to Land Your Kid in Therapy

How to Land Your Kid in Therapy | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"'Happiness as a byproduct of living your life is a great thing . . . but happiness as a goal is a recipe for disaster.' It’s precisely this goal, though, that many modern parents focus on obsessively—only to see it backfire."


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The Perfect Amount of Stress | Psychology Today

The Perfect Amount of Stress | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Stress is a killer and a life force. How can you tell the good from the bad, and too little from too much?
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Why Some Soldiers Develop PTSD and Others Don't

Why Some Soldiers Develop PTSD and Others Don't | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Pre-war vulnerability is just as important as combat-related trauma in predicting whether symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will be long-lasting, according to new research published by the Association for Psychological Science.

Gina Stepp's insight:

When they talk about pre-war vulnerability, they're essentially referring to a person's level of psychological resilience. 

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Embattled Childhoods May Be the Real Trauma for Soldiers With PTSD - Association for Psychological Science

Embattled Childhoods May Be the Real Trauma for Soldiers With PTSD - Association for Psychological Science | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

New research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers challenges popular assumptions about the origins and trajectory of PTSD, providing evidence that traumatic experiences in childhood – not combat – may predict which soldiers develop the disorder.


Psychological scientist Dorthe Berntsen of Aarhus University in Denmark and a team of Danish and American researchers wanted to understand why some soldiers develop PTSD but others don’t. They also wanted to develop a clearer understanding of how the symptoms of the disorder progress.


“Most studies on PTSD in soldiers following service in war zones do not include measures of PTSD symptoms prior to deployment and thus suffer from a baseline problem. Only a few studies have examined pre- to post-deployment changes in PTSD symptoms, and most only use a single before-and-after measure,” says Berntsen.

 

The findings challenge the notion that exposure to combat and other war atrocities is the main cause of PTSD.


“We were surprised that stressful experiences during childhood seemed to play such a central role in discriminating the resilient versus non-resilient groups,” says Berntsen. “These results should make psychologists question prevailing assumptions about PTSD and its development.”

 

[Note from Mom Psych: The really surprising thing is that the researchers were surprised. Other researchers have long known that secure attachment in childhood supports resilience (against the effects of stress as well as trauma), and that differences in resilience help explain why some people succumb to mental health issues later in life and others don't.]  See also: http://www.mom-psych.com/Articles/Trauma-and-Resilience/What-Is-Resilience-GS1001.html 

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Changing brains for the better: Moving to a resilience approach in mental health

Changing brains for the better: Moving to a resilience approach in mental health | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Practices like physical exercise, certain forms of psychological counseling and meditation can all change brains for the better, and these changes can be measured with the tools of modern neuroscience, according to a new review article.
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» Exercise: Improve Your Mood and Help Repair the Effects of Stress

» Exercise:  Improve Your Mood and Help Repair the Effects of Stress | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

What grandmothers, psychologists and friends have always suggested as an antidote for depression is backed by the research: "Exercise, you'll feel better." Getting active provides a distraction, reduces muscle tension, builds brain resources (increases and balances serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, all important neurotransmitters involved in mood), improves resilience by showing you that you can be effective in controlling anxiety, and breaks the feeling of being trapped and immobilized. The effects can be equal or even better than medication.

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Gina Stepp's comment, April 14, 2012 10:51 AM
Building resilience is not just an antidote for depression and anxiety but a preventative for these issues too.
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Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence

Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"From [a strength-based] perspective, successful development is viewed not as the absence of risk behavior but as the presence of positive attributes that enable youth to reach their full potential as productive and engaged adults.”

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Bouncing Back: Relationships as the Core of Resilience

Bouncing Back: Relationships as the Core of Resilience | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Parent-infant attachment is crucial to the development of the areas of the brain that foster resilience and the success of future family relationships.

Via Rachelle Capo
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Neuroscience may explain the Dalai Lama

Neuroscience may explain the Dalai Lama | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Many wonder how the Dalai Lama can retain his kindness and magnanimity, even as his homeland is torn apart by violence. New neuroscience research may help explain the exiled Tibetan leader's unremitting compassion for all people.
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