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A Map of the Brain: Allan Jones at TEDxCaltech

Allan Jones joined the Allen Institute in 2003 to help start up the organization as one of its first employees. Bringing extensive expertise in project leade...

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Society for Neuroscience - Studies Report Early Childhood Trauma Takes Visible Toll On Brain; Changes Found In Regions Controlling Heart and Behavior

Society for Neuroscience - Studies Report Early Childhood Trauma Takes Visible Toll On Brain; Changes Found In Regions Controlling Heart and Behavior | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Trauma in infancy and childhood shapes the brain, learning, and behavior, and fuels changes that can last a lifetime, according to new human and animal research released October 16. 

 

The findings show:

• Physical abuse in early childhood may realign communication between key “body-control” brain areas, possibly predisposing adults to cardiovascular disease and mental health problems 

• Rodent studies provide insight into brain changes that allow tolerance of pain within mother-pup attachment.


• Childhood poverty is associated with changes in working memory and attention years later in adults; yet training in childhood is associated with improved cognitive functions.


• Chronic stress experienced by infant primates leads to fearful and aggressive behaviors; these are associated with changes in stress hormone production and in the development of the amygdala.

 

Another recent finding discussed shows that:


• Parent education and income is associated with children’s brain size, including structures important for memory and emotion.

 

(The Society for Neuroscience is a nonprofit membership organization of basic scientists and physicians who study the brain and nervous system.)

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Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture?

Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

What role do early childhood experiences in nearby nature play in the formation of brain architecture? It’s time for science to ask that question.

 

In January, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof reported on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ “landmark warning that toxic stress can harm children for life.” This was, he wrote, a “’policy statement’ from the premier association of pediatricians, based on two decades of scientific research,” and he added that the statement “has revolutionary implications for medicine and for how we can more effectively chip away at poverty and crime.”

 

From conception through early childhood, brain architecture is particularly malleable and influenced by environment and relationships with primary caregivers, including toxic stress caused by abuse or chronic neglect. By interfering with healthy brain development, such stress can undermine the cognitive skills and health of a child, leading to learning difficulty and behavior problems, as well as psychological and behavior problems, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other physical ailments later in life.


Via Daniel House, Martin Daumiller, Alice Ruxton Abler, Rachelle Capo
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Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, August 3, 2012 3:42 PM
Many thanks for the rescoop!
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Your brain wiring is like a city, says neuroscience

Your brain wiring is like a city, says neuroscience | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Mapping the brain’s connections reveals a city grid like arrangement.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, Rexi44
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How Our Brains Make Memories

How Our Brains Make Memories | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Surprising new research about the act of remembering may help people with post-traumatic stress disorder.


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Social Cues in the Brain [Interactive]: Scientific American

Social Cues in the Brain [Interactive]: Scientific American | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Visit the places that help us sense other people's feelings in this Scientific American MIND tour of the brain...

Via Jone Johnson Lewis, Seth Capo
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Give Sorrow More Than Words: The Neuroscience of Grief

Give Sorrow More Than Words: The Neuroscience of Grief | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

 How can we use the discoveries of neuroscience to help those who are grieving avoid the pitfalls that often lead to depression? 

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Researchers reveal first brain study of Temple Grandin —

Researchers reveal first brain study of Temple Grandin — | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Temple Grandin, perhaps the world’s most famous person with autism, has exceptional nonverbal intelligence and spatial memory, and her brain has a host of structural and functional differences compared with the brains of controls, according to a presentation Saturday at the 2012 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in New Orleans.

 

~Via Meredith White-McMahon (Twitter: @AskDrMeredith)

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Society for Neuroscience - New Findings Illuminate Basis in Brain for Social Decisions, Reactions

Society for Neuroscience - New Findings Illuminate Basis in Brain for Social Decisions, Reactions | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

New insights into the wiring and firing of the “social brain” in humans and primates reveals the brain areas important in altruistic motives and behavior, and the brain regions that respond to the pain of discrimination. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2012, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

 

(The Society for Neuroscience is a nonprofit membership organization of basic scientists and physicians who study the brain and nervous system.)

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Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Elegance of our brain lies in its inelegance.

Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Elegance of our brain lies in its inelegance. | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

For centuries, neuroscience attempted to neatly assign labels to the various parts of the brain: this is the area for language, this one for morality, this for tool use, color detection, face recognition, and so on. This search for an orderly brain map started off as a viable endeavor, but turned out to be misguided.

 


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The Psychopath Test | This American Life

The Psychopath Test | This American Life | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

This American Life: "Recently we heard about this test that could determine if someone was a psychopath. So, naturally, our staff decided to take it. This week we hear the results. Plus Jon Ronson asks the question: is this man a psychopath?"

 

Link to transcript, though I strongly recommend listening over reading when it comes to This American Life:  http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/436/transcript

 

(Note: Even though This American Life has only recently heard about the test, the PCL-R has actually been around a good long while. See the author's site for cautions, etc: http://www.hare.org/scales/pclr.html)


Via Seth Capo
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Seth Capo's comment, March 27, 2012 12:24 PM
Some of problems you raised are addressed throughout the episode--in particular, the use of the PCL-R in a criminal justice context and the inherent subjectivity involved in rating responses. I hope you enjoy it, Gina.
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 12:31 PM
I look forward to listening to this, although one can't help but cringe when people start playing office games with diagnostic tests and/or relying on them for life-and-death decisions. The PCL-R can be especially problematic as a parlor game, because there's so much dissension over how to classify and/or reclassify the current disorders impacted by the traits it identifies. The APA doesn't list psychopathy as a disorder in the current diagnostic manual--it's really considered a set of traits associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder, more than a separate disorder at this point, but Robert Hare (who developed the test) would like to see it included in the next revised version of the DSM. The manual used by the WHO lists "dissocial personality disorder" which is seen as basically the same thing as psychopathy or sociopathy. But the APA doesn't quite see antisocial personality as perfectly synonymous. Still~ I expect this will be interesting to listen to~
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 1:23 PM
Okay. I took the quick way out and read the transcript. :) A much more engaging way of learning about the PCL-R than the way I had to do it in school. But I also thought they did a good job making the point about its limitations. I did have a good chuckle at the end.
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Neuroscience from Annie Murphy Paul: Your Brain on Fiction

Neuroscience from Annie Murphy Paul:  Your Brain on Fiction | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life.
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 22, 2012 1:57 AM
While it doesn't really have anything to do with the article (other than the connection to fiction) I love this illustration. It's from a children's book by a friend of mine named Eric Anderson. A father of a young daughter, Eric was frustrated that he couldn't find many books to read his daughter that cast "dad" in a supportive role. So he wrote this one: http://www.amazon.com/Alena-Favorite-Thing-Eric-Anderson/dp/0615151531 Every dad should read this with his daughter.
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Neuroscience may explain the Dalai Lama

Neuroscience may explain the Dalai Lama | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Many wonder how the Dalai Lama can retain his kindness and magnanimity, even as his homeland is torn apart by violence. New neuroscience research may help explain the exiled Tibetan leader's unremitting compassion for all people.
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Seeing into the future? The neuroscience of deja vu

Seeing into the future? The neuroscience of deja vu | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Even the most rational of us experience it: you'll be chatting with friends or exploring a place you've never been when suddenly a feeling washes over you: you've experienced this exact moment before.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, Romylos Pantzakis
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