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Music and the Making of Modern Science | The MIT Press

Music and the Making of Modern Science | The MIT Press | modulations | Scoop.it
utterlyelastic's insight:

'Pesic explores a series of episodes in which music influenced science, moments in which prior developments in music arguably affected subsequent aspects of natural science. He describes encounters between harmony and fifteenth-century cosmological controversies, between musical initiatives and irrational numbers, between vibrating bodies and the emergent electromagnetism [...] Taken together, these cases document the peculiar power of music—its autonomous force as a stream of experience, capable of stimulating insights different from those mediated by the verbal and the visual.'

 

 
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Why you need to dig out your old iPod Classic

Why you need to dig out your old iPod Classic | modulations | Scoop.it
That iPod Classic of yours that has been gathering dust in a bedside table could now worth hundreds of pounds.
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Why Is Dancing So Good for Your Brain?

Why Is Dancing So Good for Your Brain? | modulations | Scoop.it
Dancers maximize cognitive function and muscle memory through practice.

Via Andrew McCluskey
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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, October 9, 2013 2:59 PM

I'm a big believer in the idea of "flow" - that place you get to when you don't have to think about what you're doing - it just happens.  One of these studies showed that dancers who prepared for an upcoming routine by using "marking" and "visualization" techniques - delivered a far better performance than those who practiced at normal speed.  The thinking being that the more mentally prepared you are for an activity - the less of your brain you need to use to deliver it - which seems to leave more resource which you can use to make it excellent.

 

Not quite sure what it has to do with music - but damn it's fascinating!

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How Music Helps Kids - Infographic - The Loog Blog

How Music Helps Kids - Infographic - The Loog Blog | modulations | Scoop.it
Learning to play an instrument helps kids in more ways than one. Learn exactly how with this simple infographic.
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Roll Over, Tchaikovsky! Sex, the body & pop music in modern urban Russia | Out Magazine

Roll Over, Tchaikovsky! Sex, the body & pop music in modern urban Russia | Out Magazine | modulations | Scoop.it
Musicologist Stephen R. Amico discusses Russian popular music and post-Soviet homosexuality
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Asia-Pacific Primed for Electronic Music Explosion - hypebot.com

Asia-Pacific Primed for Electronic Music Explosion - hypebot.com | modulations | Scoop.it
Guest post by Hisham Dahud - artist, producer, and the Digital Strategey Director of Fame House Without a doubt, electronic music culture has exploded to almost unfathomable heights.
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How Spotify Engineered the New Music Economy

How Spotify Engineered the New Music Economy | modulations | Scoop.it
In a post-Napster music industry, Spotify seems to have concocted a winning monetization formula, but not all its participants are happy with the numbers.

Via Benjamin Costantini
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Maurice Clark's curator insight, October 13, 2013 9:24 PM

How can artist generate income from online streaming? Spotify hasn't completely answered that question, but it's a good start. This article details how a not so known band managed to greatly increase their popularity by using this service. I think if Spotify could some way generate enough interest that a massive amount of consumers subscribe and continue to use this service, they will become a game changer. The trick is to get people to subscribe to a paying service when they could get it for free somewhere else. 

Devin Grandberry's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:56 AM

Many artists question how they can make a profit or benefit from online streaming especially knowing that there are many other ways to access music for free. Spotify in my opinion would be more of a promotion tactic and maybe career launcher, as far as profitting from it, im not so sure. The trick is gaining viewers, and subscribers making them willing to purchase.

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Music affects how you perceive others

Music affects how you perceive others | modulations | Scoop.it

Via Andrew McCluskey
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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:35 PM

Recently came across the Neuroaesthetics of Music group up inHelsinki.  They have some really interesting small FMRI studies that are delving into how the brain process music and emotion.  This study looked at how people perceived other human beings - one group got calming music whil doing it - another group got modulated artificial tones.  Seems that if you're experiencing calming and pleasant music - you will experience the world as calming and pleasant.  Not hugely surprising - but the study is looking at brain activity levels and apparently the differences in activity are quite significant.