Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ
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Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ
Different opinions on controversial issues between rural and urban areas
Curated by Mollie Nole
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Euthanasia

Euthanasia | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

Three out of four americans support the idea of euthanasia. 

 

An examination of the responses by various demographic characteristics shows that the people who are most likely to be affected by the difference in question wording are evangelical Christians, and to a lesser extent young males and rural residents.

Among evangelical Christians, 61% support euthanasia, while only 32% approve of doctor-assisted suicide -- a net difference of 29 points. Among all Americans, the difference is 17 points. Eighty-seven percent of men under the age of 50 support euthanasia, but only 63% support doctor-assisted suicide -- a difference of 24 points. Seventy-one percent of rural residents support euthanasia, while only 47% support doctor-assisted suicide -- a net difference also of 24 points.

Studies showed that 78% of people living in urban areas voted "yes" to authanasia, while 71% in rural areas voted "yes" to the issue. also, 59% in urban areas voted "yes" to doctor assisted suicide, while 47% in rural areas voted "yes" to the issue. 

 

Clearly, though it is not too much of a gap, urban areas are more accepting of the idea of euthanasia and doctor assisted suicide, opposed to rural areas. 

 

David W. Moore is a Senior Fellow with the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire. He is a former Vice President of the Gallup Organization and was a senior editor with the Gallup Poll for thirteen years. He is author of The Opinion Makers:An Insider Exposesthe Truth Behind the Polls (Beacon, 2008; trade paperback edition, 2009). Publishers’ Weekly refers to it as a “succinct and damning critique...Keen and witty throughout.

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Legalization of Marijuana

Legalization of Marijuana | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

Lynn Zimmer, PhD, former Professor Emeritus at the Queens College, City University, New York (CUNY), and John P. Morgan, MD, Medical Professor Emeritus at CUNY Medical School, wrote the following in their 1997 book Marijuana Myths, Marijuana Facts:   "The question is not whether marijuana is better than existing medication. For many medical conditions, there are numerous medications available, some of which work better in some patients and some which work better in others. Having the maximum number of effective medications available allows physicians to deliver the best possible medical care to individual patients"   Also-    Hillary Rodham Clinton, JD, US Secretary of State and US Senator (D-NY) at the time of the quote, stated the following during an Oct. 11, 2007 town hall meeting at Plymouth State College:   "With respect to medical marijuana, you know I think that we have had a lot of rhetoric and the federal government has been very intent upon trying to prevent states from being able to offer that as an option for people who are in pain. I think we should be doing medical research on this. We ought to find what are the elements that claim to be existing in marijuana that might help people who are suffering from cancer and nausea-related treatments. We ought to find that out. I don't think we should decriminalize it, but we ought to do research into what, if any, medical benefits it has"    

 

 

 

These two documents suggest that urban areas are more accepting of legalization of marijuana use for medical purposes. 

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Gay Marriage

Gay Marriage | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

"Voting on similar amendments in other states have shown a stark, and decisive, urban-rural contrast. Generally, voters in more diverse and youthful urban areas opposed the amendments, while more conservative rural residents strongly favored them. In North Carolina, for example, voters rejected the amendment in only eight of 100 counties; most were either urban areas, like Raleigh and Charlotte, or university towns, like Asheville or Chapel Hill."

 

This document suggests that rural areas are less accepting of gay marriage, and are more likely to favor amendments opposing gay marriage, while urban areas are more accepting and more likely to oppose amendments opposing gay marriage. 

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Activity

Activity | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

"The local government provided an address list of all adults (20–65 years) living in the selected neighborhoods. In each neighborhood, 150 randomly selected adults received a letter with information on the study. Two to 6 days after posting the letters, possible participants were visited at home. Adults who agreed to participate filled out a written informed consent form. During the home visit, the interview version of the Neighbourhood Physical Activity Questionnaire (NPAQ)27 was completed. The participants were also asked to complete a questionnaire on psychosocial and sociodemographic correlates of PA by themselves.28 Moreover, they were instructed to wear a pedometer on the right hip for seven consecutive days. They were asked to reset the pedometer to zero at the beginning of each day, to remove the pedometer only while bathing, showering, or swimming, and to complete an activity log at the end of each day. The completed questionnaires, pedometers, and activity logs were collected during a second home visit, 1 week after the first one. Home visits were carried out until 35 participants were recruited in each neighborhood. To recruit 350 participants, 1,150 possible participants needed to be approached (response rate=30.4%; ranging from 28.4% to 32.9% across neighborhoods)."

 

 

"As shown in Table 2, participants living in the urban neighborhoods took significantly more steps on weekdays than participants living in the rural neighborhoods"

 

This article suggests that urban inhabitants get more exercise than rural inhabitants

 

Articles from Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine are provided here courtesy of New York Academy of Medicine

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Health Care

Health Care | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

http://www.healthreform.gov/reports/hardtimes/ ;


"High poverty rates and job loss in the current economic recession highlight the challenges of accessing health care and rising health care costs in rural areas.

Rates of poverty are higher, with 15% of people in rural areas living below the poverty level compared to 12% of people in urban areas.The rural economy is dominated by small businesses, which are struggling as the cost of health care continues to skyrocket"

 

Rural areas are typically more in favor for health care, opposed to a sort of voucher program that Romney suggested. Though many urban areas may be in favor of having health care benefits, rural areas are the majority, where people are poor due to lack of business for small organizations and businesses. 

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Guns Rights

Guns Rights | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

" “I have always believed that the Second Amendment protects the right of individuals to bear arms,” Mr. Obama is quoted as saying. “But I also identify with the need for crime-ravaged communities to save their children from the violence that plagues our streets through common-sense, effective safety measures.” If Charlton Heston were still living, he could have comfortably uttered the same sentences.

Partisans on both sides will argue about whether Mr. Obama’s equivocation represents a clarification or a reversal of his previous statements on the subject. But the truth is that it doesn’t matter. Far more important is that the gradual disintegration of the gun control movement that once drove Democratic politics is now pretty much complete. For decades, the true meaning of the Second Amendment has been the subject of wrenching public debate. But last Thursday, when the Court expressly and historically extended the right of gun ownership to private citizens, the Democratic Party’s nominee for president merely shrugged.

Certainly, there were others who spoke out forcefully against the decision: some big city mayors (most notably Richard Daley of Chicago), a few dedicated congressional voices (like Senator Dianne Feinstein of California) and the long-time voices of the professional advocate community rushed to battle stations."

 

This document suggests that urban areas are more in favor of the second amendment, which gives us the right to bear arms. President Obama wants to change our gun rights, and urban areas are not in favor of this. 

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Abortion

"A study using 1800 "lost letters" was designed to test the hypothesis that returned responses would be greater in smaller rural communities (population M = 964) than in a city (population = 60,591) or the suburbs (population = 195,847) unless the addressee was affiliated with a pro-abortion group. Returns to control, Committee For Free Abortion, and Committee Against Free Abortion affiliates were 37.2%, 24.0%, 29.3%, respectively. From the city, the number of returned letters was much larger than the number from the suburbs except for those letters with an affiliation to the pro-abortion condition. Returned letters from the city were fewer than those from smaller rural communities except those letters affiliated with the pro-abortion group. More letters affiliated with the pro-abortion condition were returned from the suburbs than from the smaller rural communities. The geographic condition influenced over-all rates of return. Rates were higher when letters were addressed to a city P.O. Box than to a rural one. Second, rates were also greater in smaller rural communities for letters bearing "in-town" (Molino) and "out-of-town" (Pensacola) addresses than those from the city bearing an "out-of-town" (Molino) address. These findings seem to indicate the possibility that there may be some geographic bias in the willingness of people to help a stranger in need by returning a lost letter."

 

This study suggests that Rural and suburban areas are less accepting of abortion, opposed to urban areas. 

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Environmentalism

Environmentalism | Modern Rural Vs. Urban DBQ | Scoop.it

"In February 2006, bestselling author of The Purpose-

Driven Life, Rick Warren, and other high-profile
evangelical leaders issued a public statement declaring
their commitment to help fight global warming. In the
months since, media commentators and political analysts
have linked this environmental turn among evangelicals to
broader cultural changes in the evangelical movement. The
rise of a new generation of pastors and leaders has, many
have argued, expanded the evangelical agenda beyond
abortion, gay rights, and creationism.

Given the importance of the evangelical vote in presidential
and congressional elections, and the centrality of environmental
issues in the current U.S. presidential campaign,
could environmentalism be the new wedge issue among
religious voters? If so, it will be important to learn more
about one particular voting sector: the rural vote. Rural
voters, who are more often evangelical, may see the effects
of global warming first-hand, given the centrality of natural
resources to their livelihoods. Rural voters are also often the
swing vote in close elections."

 

Megan Henly is a doctoral student in sociology. As a recipient of the Community, Health, and Environment Fellowship, she has worked at the Carsey Institute on the Community and Environment in Rural America (CERA) survey, collaborating on survey design and data analysis since 2008.

Megan holds a master’s degree in survey methodology from the University of Maryland and has experience in survey production and statistical analysis working for the federal government and in the nonprofit sector.

 

In her studies, Rural americans are more concerned about the environment and global warming, compared to urban areas. 

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