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Please Remember in Your Prayers Dr. Berenice Bleedorn - Newsroom

Please Remember in Your Prayers Dr. Berenice Bleedorn - Newsroom | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
An educator for more than 40 years, she was known widely for her work in the field of creativity.
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10 Axioms for Learning Design (and just what IS an axiom, anyway?) | Global Learning Partners

10 Axioms for Learning Design (and just what IS an axiom, anyway?) | Global Learning Partners | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
At Global Learning Partners, we are energized by our work with a diverse range of clients worldwide, and are driven by a desire to effect lasting global change towards peace and justice.
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‘The future is medieval’

‘The future is medieval’ | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
What follows is an interview and discussion I had in Odense, Denmark, with Thomas Pettitt and Lars Ole Sauerberg, two scholars at the University of Southern Denmark, who made a splash in digital media circles with their theory of the “Gutenberg Parenthesis,”...
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Excelsior Learning

Excelsior Learning | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it

The Bursts of Fresh Squeezed Ideas Process & Skill ModelTM
is an adaptation of Osborn's (1953) original
creative-problem-solving model and consists of the following:

 

A three phase creative-thinking process:
- Phase 1 - Climb the Right Mountain
- Phase 2 - Storm the Brains
- Phase 3 - Ignite Your Engines


Two creative-thinking skill areas:
- Cognitive
- Versatility


One motivational elements area

 

 

Phase 1 - Climb the Right Mountain


During Phase 1, the creative-thinking facilitator looks
at challenges and goals through different lenses and "peels back" the layers. Reframing the challenge or goal provides further clarification
and allows the exploration of different possibilities.


Accordingly, Phase 1 has the following high level process steps:

• Explore the Challenge
• Explore, define, and shape challenge(s) and goal(s)
• Generate challenge and goal statement(s)
• Prioritize and shape the challenge(s) or goal(s)

• Visualize the Future
• Visualize the desired future environment
• Assess the current environment
• Identify the gaps that exist between the current and desire future environment

• Get the Facts
• Make smart guesses about opportunity areas or causes of problems
• Identify the essential facts and information; find the real opportunity or problem
• Analyze the data; see relationships and confirm them with data

• Clarify the Opportunity
• Redefine, refocus, and clarify the opportunity or problem
• Write a well-defined opportunity or problem statement

 

 

Phase 2 - Storm the Brains:

 

People tend to stick with what they know when confronted with
an opportunity or problem rather than explore new ideas.
During Phase 2, the creative-thinking facilitator is dedicated
to raining an abundance of imaginative ideas and alternatives,
breaking, and making new connections, being counterintuitive,
taking a break to incubate, strengthening, prioritizing,
and selecting solutions, and embracing ambiguity.

 

With these goals, Phase 2 has the following high level process steps:

• Rain Ideas
• Organize the ideas and alternatives by themes
• Hit the most promising ideas

• Take a Break & Incubate
• Step away from the opportunity or problem
• Combine, synthesize, and integrate ideas and elements

• Strengthen & Select the Best Ideas & Solutions
• Strengthen the ideas that have the greatest potential
• Synthesize and integrate the ideas to form a solution(s)
• Select the solution(s) that best meet your criteria and objectives

 

 

Phase 3 - Ignite Your Engines:

 

Nothing has happened until a product, process, service idea,
or solution gets prototyped, tested, and implemented.
From there, the reaction of the marketplace needs to be gauged quickly.
So the mantra can be summed up as - prototype fast, and if the marketplace reacts positively, fully allocate resources to its implementation and accelerate the momentum. If the marketplace reacts negatively and isn't going to buy - fail fast, early, and cheap - then quickly adapt and change course.
Upon successful implementation, anchor the gains with organizational systems, processes, and culture.

 

To that end, the creative-thinking facilitator moves through
Phase 3 by taking the following high level process steps:

• Get the Momentum
• Develop and implement rapid action plans
• Develop and implement quicksand avoidance and contingency plans

• Accelerate the Momentum and Adapt
• Develop and implement a performance dashboard
• Verify performance results
• Adapt and re-allocate resources
• Anchor the gains

 

 

The Creative-Thinking Skill Areas

Cognitive & Versatility Skills, and Motivational Elements:

 

A creative-thinking process is certainly important and required.
Equally important are the skills necessary to think creatively.
And possibly most important is the motivation to act.
The stronger the creative-thinking skill set, the greater the likelihood
a steady stream of rich and robust ideas and solutions will be developed.
The stronger the motivation to innovate, the higher the probability
the best ideas and solutions will be implemented.

 

The art is for the creative-thinking facilitator to stay motivated,
know when to call on a particular creative-thinking skill or set of skills,
and at what step in the creative-thinking process.

 

Paul Torrance (1979) offered the following framework
to describe the characteristics of creative-thinking and problem-solving:


Fluency

• The quantity of ideas that can be produced.
• The ability to generate ideas easily and quickly.


Flexibility

• The breadth of different types, varieties,
   and categories of ideas that can be produced.

• The ability to use varying stimuli, viewpoints,
   or perspectives to think of ideas.

 

Originality

• The uniqueness and quantity of ideas that can be produced.

• The ability to produce different, original, and unusual ideas.


Elaboration

• The detail richness of ideas.

• The ability to make ideas more interesting,
   stronger, appealing, and complete.


Using these characteristics as a framework, the creative-thinking skills

are organized into three areas of emphasis - cognitive and versatility skills;

and motivational elements.

 


Cognitive Skills

 

Cognitive skills are one broad foundational creative-thinking
and problem-solving skill area. These can include thinking styles,
abilities, and aptitudes. Treffinger (1996) identified productive
thinking skills to include:

 

• Critical thinking (drawing out specific meaning);

• Creative-thinking (new and useful ideas);

• Problem-solving (identifying and solving a known issue);

• Decision-making (choosing the best alternative).

 

When drawing upon these various productive thinking skills,
the creative-thinker and problem-solver summons his/her expertise.
Amabile (1996) defined this expertise to consist of:
factual and specialized knowledge in a focused area or task; technical fluency and proficiency; and talents in a specified area or task.
It takes time to develop a deep level of expertise in a specific area.
It requires intensive, focused effort over sustained periods of time.


The five cognitive skills focused on in this program are the following:

 

Identify Goals & Objectives

Explore, define, and shape challenges, goals, objectives, opportunities, and problems; reframe them in ways that they can be pursued and solved by broadening them or breaking them down.

 

Discover What's Most Important

Identify the essential facts and information, and highlight what is critical;
analyze data and see relationships between things; understand complexities,
and seek new interpretations or meanings from data or input.

 

Generate Novel & Useful Ideas

Generate a rich variety and abundance of novel, unusual,and useful ideas and alternatives quickly and easily; build upon and stoke other ideas.

 

Integrate & Synthesize

Elaborate on the positives and potential in ideas to make them more interesting, stronger, appealing and complete; identify the drawbacks and develop ways to overcome them; refine and select the most promising.

 

Plan for Action

Develop short, medium, and long-term implementation plans;
identify and implement problem-prevention and contingency plans;
develop, implement and use performance indicators to make decisions
and reallocate resources as required.

 


Versatility Skills

 

Versatility skills consist of the various methods, approaches, and capabilities a problem-solver uses to tackle challenges, opportunities, and problems.

Torrance (1972); Amabile (1996); Goleman, Kauffman, & Ray (1993); Puccio, Murdock & Mance (2005) among other creativity researchers have written about the strong correlation between cognitive and versatility skills, and how our thinking is greatly influenced by and interleaved with our underlying emotions and feelings.

 

Additionally, Gordon (1961) and Prince (1970) popularized the use of heuristics
in creative-problem-solving. A heuristic is a flexible thinking approach - the opposite of an algorithm. Examples of heuristics include: (a) when all else fails, try something counterintuitive; (b) make the familiar strange; and (c) make the strange familiar.

 

The five versatility creative-thinking skills focused
on in this program are the following:

 

Be Curious

Remain flexible, play with and create new ideas and content; ask challenging, penetrating, and provocative questions; defer judgment and keep options
open as long as possible; actively seek out new information, ideas, and opposing
opinions, and resist the tension to make decisions prematurely.

 

Imagine What's Possible

Use rich, colorful, and vibrant imagery to visualize the future vision;
be imaginative, dream, and use fantasy; ask what-if questions about things
that don't yet exist; remain optimistic, affirmative, and open to what's possible.

 

See it Differently

Look at situations through different lenses, and see things from a different visual, perceptual, or cognitive, perspective; use wide categories to think beyond currently defined parameters, and broaden the system or requirements within
which a challenge or goal exists; look at and describe the internal working of things.

 

Be Unique & Original

Resist conformity, be independent in thought, and adapt thinking to do different things; break out of habitual responses and performance scripts; develop fresh, unique, not obvious, and contrarian points of view and content; adapt thinking to do different things.

 

Break Old & Make New Connections

Combine, synthesize, and piggyback seemingly unrelated ideas, parts, andelements; seek out, play close attention to, and take advantage of incongruities;take a break and incubate.

 


Motivational Elements

 

Beyond the skills, Amabile (1996) as well as other creativity researchers have identified the varied sources, characteristics, and attributes that also contribute to the richness of a person's creative-thinking and problem-solving skills, including: personality characteristics, traits, and preferences; working, problem-solving styles and lifestyles (methods of dealing with experiences, opportunities, and challenges); the work or cultural environments; extrinsic and intrinsic task motivation, and social influences (lack of concern or need for social approval); and biochemical and neurological factors. All these characteristics and attributes influence a problem-solvers' approach and impact the veracity of how versatile, imaginative, and persistent he/she may be in pursing a challenge, goal, opportunity, or problem.

 

The five motivational elements focused on in this program are the following:

 

Use Motivation, Passion & Energy

Pay attention to, channel, and leverage your passion, energy, internal motives, and drivers; become deeply absorbed and involved in the activities you truly care about and love - and find a way to make a living doing it.

 

Leverage Strengths
Play to, focus on, and rely on natural aptitudes, talents, knowledge, information, and skills; don't try to be well rounded; manage, compensate for, and neutralize weaknesses.

 

Build Resilience

Embrace positive developments and setbacks and learn from them;
take action, learn by doing, and implement your solutions; use positive affirmations and eliminate the destructive voice-of-judgment from your thinking; quickly let go of disappointments, forget them and move on.

 

Use Emotion, Humor & Joy

See the humor in things and use it to recognize and respond to opposites
and surprises; create an atmosphere where you can be playful, spontaneous,
and joyful with ideas - and flow with them where they take you;
allow your ideas and alternatives to be illogical, wishful, and emotional.

 

Take Risks

Trust and follow gut instincts and intuition; quickly get to prototype;
recognize the importance of new information; develop problem-prevention
and contingency actions.


Orchestrating Motivation and the Skills

 

The synergy occurs when the creative-thinker leverages and channels internal motivation, and orchestrates the use of creative-thinking and problem-solving skills to work harmoniously within the creative- thinking process. Certain challenges, goals, opportunities, and problems require differing mixes - summoning internal motivation, and calling upon the different skills in varying amounts and with varying frequencies.

 

With the right mixture, the synapses in the creative-thinking brain continue to fire, and the bursts of fresh-squeezed ideas and alternatives just keep flowing, one right after another.

 

 


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The Creativity Crisis

The Creativity Crisis | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it

"Back in 1958, Ted Schwarzrock was an 8-year-old third grader when he became one of the 'Torrance kids,' a group of nearly 400 Minneapolis children who completed a series of creativity tasks newly designed by professor E. Paul Torrance. Schwarzrock still vividly remembers the moment when a psychologist handed him a fire truck and asked, 'How could you improve this toy to make it better and more fun to play with?' Kyung Hee Kim at the College of William & Mary found creativity scores had been steadily rising, just like IQ scores, until 1990. Since then, creativity scores have consistently inched downward. 'It’s very clear, and the decrease is very significant,' Kim says. It is the scores of younger children in America—from kindergarten through sixth grade—for whom the decline is 'most serious.'" 


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Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic

Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
Download an 11X17 version of the Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers Infographic by Mentoring Minds.com.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Kim Flintoff
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Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:05 PM
Mathy: Definitely the time to make some changes...
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
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ACMI Storyboard Generator

ACMI Storyboard Generator | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
A creative studio space to explore storytelling and the moving image. Download free video, images and sound and upload your own media. Create your own storyboards and share them online.

 

My rating: still exploring

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The Future of Learning, Networked Society - Ericsson

Learn more at http://www.ericsson.com/networkedsociety Can ICT redefine the way we learn in the Networked Society? Technology has enabled us to interact, inn...
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Critical thinking is critical to America's progress

Critical thinking is critical to America's progress | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
"The Creativity Crisis," an article published recently in Newsweek magazine [July 19, 2010 edition], was an amazing and exciting surprise.
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Berenice Bleedorn: Remembering a Great Woman on International Women's Day | Facebook

Berenice Bleedorn: Remembering a Great Woman on International Women's Day | Facebook | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
Steve Dahlberg wrote a note titled Berenice Bleedorn: Remembering a Great Woman on International Women's Day. Read the full text here.
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Why Twitter's Oral Culture Irritates Bill Keller (and why this is an important issue)

Why Twitter's Oral Culture Irritates Bill Keller (and why this is an important issue) | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
Bill Keller of the New York Times has just written a provocative piece lamenting that new technologies are eroding essential human characteristics.
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Research Overwhelmingly Counsels an End to Tracking

"BOULDER, CO (May 30, 2013) –The final installment in a series of short briefs summarizing current relevant findings in education policy research reviews the evidence about 'tracking' students – that is, enrolling students in particular classes, curricula and courses of study based on perceived ability.

 

Rather than achieving its purported goal – to tailor instruction to the diverse needs of students – tracking has, over decades of extensive research, been repeatedly found to be harmful to students enrolled in lower tracks and to provide no significant advantages for higher-tracked students, writes Dr. William Mathis, the author of the series. Mathis is managing director of the National Education Policy Center, housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education.

 

Mathis also points to the overwhelming research finding that tracking stratifies students by race and by parental wealth. What this means, he explains, is that tracking is one of the primary mistakes that schools make if they hope to close achievement gaps. Children with the most limited opportunities to learn outside of school are then given lesser opportunities within the school.

 

'Whether known as sorting, streaming or ability grouping, an expansive body of literature conclusively shows tracking is harmful and inequitable and remains an unsupportable practice,' Mathis says.

 

Summing up the research, Mathis writes that lower-track classes 'tend to have watered-down curriculum, less-experienced teachers, lowered expectations, more discipline problems, and less- engaging lessons.' But, he continues, it doesn’t have to be this way: 'When high-quality, enriched curriculum is provided to all students, the effect is to benefit both high-achieving and low-achieving students.'"


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The Creativity Crisis

The Creativity Crisis | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it

"Back in 1958, Ted Schwarzrock was an 8-year-old third grader when he became one of the 'Torrance kids,' a group of nearly 400 Minneapolis children who completed a series of creativity tasks newly designed by professor E. Paul Torrance. Schwarzrock still vividly remembers the moment when a psychologist handed him a fire truck and asked, 'How could you improve this toy to make it better and more fun to play with?' Kyung Hee Kim at the College of William & Mary found creativity scores had been steadily rising, just like IQ scores, until 1990. Since then, creativity scores have consistently inched downward. 'It’s very clear, and the decrease is very significant,' Kim says. It is the scores of younger children in America—from kindergarten through sixth grade—for whom the decline is 'most serious.'" 


Via Todd Reimer
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Old is Gold and So is an Older Worker

Old is Gold and So is an Older Worker | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it

An organisation can always rely strongly on intuitions of older people and take drastic decisions with effective results. Older workers have invested considerable amount of time in industries and so they are able to draw concrete experiences as required for adapting with changes in techniques and internal processes. Their lifelong experience in tackling interpersonal relationships renders them opportunity in efficient and capable handling of various crisis situations like controlling disgruntling customers or conflicts between employees. It is likely because of their confidence in managing various circumstances that would otherwise have flummoxed employees.


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Kerry Watson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:35 AM

Older workers attain milestone of success with experience. While their age speedily doubles, they acquire immense practical knowledge for better application. Though practical experience helps, theoretical knowledge earned through online masters or online bachelors at a ripening age is great useful. They are inflated with knowledge but an online higher study adds credence to applicability.

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Creating the Schools of the Future: Education for a Sustainable Society | Solutions

Creating the Schools of the Future: Education for a Sustainable Society | Solutions | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
Creating the Schools of the Future: Education for a Sustainable Society
By Peter Senge
http://t.co/xAkCsqGt9C
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Emma Pails's curator insight, May 26, 2014 10:59 PM

The following article written by Peter Senge (2012) argues the importance of building a sustainable future. He feels that societies are purely focused on the suitability of the bricks for business and governments, while completely ignoring the mortar of education.

Where in fact his is where it all begins, it is in classrooms that teachers can educate students about sustainability. It is here that they learn to make informed and ethical decisions about the role, impact and use of technologies in the economy, environment and society for a sustainable future (ACARA, 2014).

 

It is absolutely crucial that we get the message through that schools and more importantly educators can create real and lasting change!

 

Peter (2012) states that from the early years through to high school, curriculum needs to focus on leadership, personal engagement, problem resolution, and real-life contexts. Collaboration also plays a key role, among students and teachers within the school context, and parents, board members, and civic and business leaders outside of the school.

 

Check it out here

http://www.thesolutionsjournal.com/node/1116

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Information Literacy In An Age Of Networked Knowledge

Information Literacy In An Age Of Networked Knowledge | Model for Intelligence | Scoop.it
I love this visual note from a Howard Rheingold presentation at SXSW. He was launching his new book called Net Smart: How To Thrive Online. From just lookin

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