Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps
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Crowdsourced Business Models: A Guide To Create Revenue With The Help of Everyone Else

Robin Good: If you are looking for a good introductory guide to the use of crowds for the generation of revenue and the extended monetization of existing line of products/services, I definitely recommend giving a good look to this guide prepared by Ross Dawson and Steve Bynghall.

 

In the guide you can find out why crowdsourced business models are so promising and why they are being adopted rapidly by the major brands around the world.

 

Recommended reading. 8/10


Read or download the full guide here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/75173330/Getting-Results-From-Crowds-Chapter-22-Crowd-Business-Models ;


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Alternative Monetization Strategies For Freelance Web Designers

Alternative Monetization Strategies For Freelance Web Designers | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Here is a good article illustrating the several different alternatives available to any web designer to extend his revenue channels.

 

The creation and sale of design templates, icons collections, ebooks, advertising as well as the development of dedicated tools, software and plugins can be just some of the many extra revenue-making options available.

 

From the original article: "To summarize, the main lesson I’ve learned over the last couple of years is to have a long-term view and invest in yourself, not chase a quick buck.


The plan is rather simple, then: build a network, cultivate a strong identity to ensure the network knows who you are, and then come up with a product you can market to it."

 

Informative. Resorceful. 8/10

 

Full article: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2012/08/27/designer-passive-income-experiments/

 

 


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The Business of Information Refinement: How Journalism Can Leverage Big Data To Create Value and New Revenues

The Business of Information Refinement: How Journalism Can Leverage Big Data To Create Value and New Revenues | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Extracting meaning out of big data, illustrating and visualizing relationships and links between apparently disconnected items and approaching the gathering of information for the purpose of surfacing what otherwise would not be immediately evident, may all be commercially fertile areas as some of the pionerring examples seem to show.

 

From the original essay, part of the Data Journalism Handbook: "Many journalists seem to be unaware of the size of the revenue that is already generated through data collection, data analytics and visualization.

 

This is the business of information refinement.

 

With data tools and technologies it is increasingly possible to shed a light on highly complex issues, be this international finance, debt, demography, education and so on.

 

...These technologies can now be applied to journalism...

 

But how does this generate money for journalism?

 

The big, worldwide market that is currently opening up is all about transformation of publicly available data into something our that we can process: making data visible and making it human.

 

We want to be able to relate to the big numbers we hear every day in the news — what the millions and billions mean for each of us.

 

There are a number of very profitable data-driven media companies, who have simply applied this principle earlier than others. They enjoy healthy growth rates and sometimes impressive profits.

 

a) One example: Bloomberg. The company operates about 300,000 terminals and delivers financial data to it’s users. If you are in the money business this is a power tool. ... This core business generates an estimated US $6.3 billion per year, at least this what a piece by the New York Times estimated in 2008. As a result, Bloomberg has been hiring journalists left, right and centre, they bought the venerable but loss-making “Business Week” and so on.

 

b) Another example is the Canadian media conglomerate today known as Thomson Reuters. They started with one newspaper, bought up a number of well known titles in the UK, and then decided two decades ago to leave the newspaper business. Instead they have grown based on information services, aiming to provide a deeper perspective for clients in a number of industries. If you worry about how to make money with specialized information, the advice would be to just read about the company’s history in Wikipedia.


c) And look at the Economist. The magazine has built an excellent, influential brand on its media side. At the same time the “Economist Intelligence Unit” is now more like a consultancy, reporting about relevant trends and forecasts for almost any country in the world. They are employing hundreds of journalists and claim to serve about 1.5 million customers worldwide."

 

If you are still doubtful that big data, information refinement, news curation and specialized info services are areas where it is going to be tough to create revenues, think again.

 

Recommended. 9/10

 

Full essay: http://datajournalismhandbook.org/1.0/en/in_the_newsroom_10.html

Data Journalism Handbook: http://datajournalismhandbook.org/

 

 


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Curate and Monetize Your Best Audio and Video Contents with Pivotshare

Curate and Monetize Your Best Audio and Video Contents with Pivotshare | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Pivotshare is a web platform which allows you to create a branded web site where you can curate, promote and sell your best digital media video and audio files. 

 

The service accepts .mp4, .mov, swf, .flv, .avi and .mp3 files for upload and it lets you set the price and the business model (subscription or pay-per-view or a combination of both) that you want to use.

 

On Pivotshare you can brand your channel with your logo and customize its look and feel, and you can also "bookmark" specific "spots" inside your audio and video content.

Content on PIvotshare is accessible by both desktop computers as well by smartphone and tablet devices and it has the ability to memorize, for the user, where a sesson is left, so that it can be picked up next time he logs in.

 

You can set up some of your content to be free and some of it to be accessible only by paying for it. Each channel can be fueled by more than a contributor and you are free to decide who will team up with you.

 

There are two delivery formats available to curate and organize your key assets: a) the Showcase (ideal for ten items or less) and b) the Library (for collections of 50 or more items).

 

Revenue-wise Pivotshare takes 30% from a Channel’s revenue, and passes the rest to the Editor and Contributors of that Channel.

 

To use the service there is no upfront cost.

 

 

Real-world example: https://ted.pivotshare.com

 

Demo Examples: http://www.pivotshare.com/how-it-works/#demo ;

 

How it works: http://www.pivotshare.com/how-it-works/

 

Getting Started Guide: http://www.pivotshare.com/getting-started-guide/

 

FAQ: http://www.pivotshare.com/faq/

 

Find out more: http://www.pivotshare.com/home/

 

 


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Jim Lerman's curator insight, December 21, 2012 7:51 PM

For the entrepreneurs out there...or maybe a fundraiser for your class or school.