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5 Habits of Highly Effective Communicators - Forbes

5 Habits of Highly Effective Communicators - Forbes | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it
It's no secret that good leaders are also good communicators. And the best leaders have learned that effective communication is as much about authenticity as the words they speak and write.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 4, 2012 11:06 AM

Here's a quick article with very good advice. It's not about story structure, or the elements of a compelling story. It is instead all the things you need to think about BEFORE you launch into a story.


Like -- does your story match your actions? Or is there some misalignment there. 


Are your stories making the complex simple -- or are they still too convoluted with details and side-tracks?


This article applies whether you are a leader in an enterprise, or a small biz owner. 


And I love that the article ends with a focus on listening -- which is truly the heart of great storytelling!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What is the role of storytelling in PR?

What is the role of storytelling in PR? | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it
Are you sitting comfortably? Then listen to PR leaders discussing the power of storytelling to build brands and energise businesses (Interesting read "@ThePRCoach: Good read: What is the role of #storytelling in #PR?

 

I love this post that reminds us all about the power of storytelling for businesses. Here Public Relations leaders share with us how stories are critical to use in business for branding and building a strong customer base.

 

Stories are everywhere, but the real trick is the following, says Tom Watson, professor of public relations at Bournemouth University: “For brand communicators, the challenge is to create narratives that are deserving of trust by their target markets and sustainable over time."


I also like what Kevin Murray, chairman of PR agency the Good Relations Group, says: “I use stories to entertain people at dinner parties to amuse. But in business you need to tell stories that make a difference.” Good point! 

 

Go read what the PR professionals in the article have to say. There are great insights.

 

Link to original article: http://prmoment.com/1212/What-is-the-role-of-storytelling-in-PR.aspx ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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The power of a spoken word

The power of a spoken word | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

Storytellers change their presentation style in different situations. What is suitable for an intimate venue, will not work as well in a large venue. What works for a circle of ten people, does not work in the same way for a circle of twenty-five. Even the hour of day, among many other things, might call for a different capacity or approach. Not everything is possible or fit for storytelling. Amplification might solve a volume issue but it doesn’t do much for intimacy. On the other hand there are situations where it does. The way to gain ‘elasticity’ that will enable a storyteller to adapt as needed, is by learning how to stretch and fold his own wings. It’s like learning how to diminish and increase sound in music. It’s not only changing the volume – the entire sound-production mechanism adapts.

 

[Image credit: brewbooks on Flickr]

 

Ahhh -- words of wisdom from one of my colleagues and favorite storytellers -- Llimor Shiponi. This post of hers is all about storytelling elasticity and the power of oral storytelling.

 

In this electronic age when digital storytelling is often viewed as THE SOLUTION -- this post is a reminder that oral storytelling is still the gold standard.

 

Want executive presence? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

Want to increase business? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

There's no substitute. Enjoy Limor's wise words of wisdom here!

 

And thank you Gregg Morris @greggvm for originally finding and sharing this article!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes

Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

"A great quote can provide personal inspiration and can be used to educate others. The contributor shares his top 100 leadership quotes of all time."

 

Excerpted (some of my own favorites taken from Kevin's list):

 

You don’t need a title to be a leader. –Multiple Attributions    A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. —John Maxwell    My own definition of leadership is this: The capacity and the will to rally men and women to a common purpose and the character which inspires confidence. —General Montgomery    Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations. —Peter Drucker    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has. —Margaret Mead    The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is a genetic factor to leadership. That’s nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born. —Warren Bennis    To command is to serve, nothing more and nothing less. —Andre Malraux     He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander. —Aristotle

 

Deb:  It seems to be true, per another Scoop, that leadership, in a sense, doesn't really exist, from Peter Drucker's perspective.  It is about trust, respect, leader development opportunity, influence and community (relationship / networks / feedback.)   That's my perspective on the leadership-train-talk.

 

(Have a favorite quote that didn't make the list? Share it in the comments section below.)


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Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership

Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

"Insights into Leadership & the Politics of Gender via the book, The End of Men: And the Rise of Women by Hanna Rosin to be published in Britain in October"

 

At the local Women's Exchange of Washtenaw Forum 2012, one of our Open Space group discussions was on the Politics of Gender.  This intriguing book brings up good points about the shifts & changes in our disruptive, social media charged, globally connected world.    

   

The photo set, including several public photos, is here:  Women, Empowerment at WXW Open Space Exchange Forum2012   ~  Deb

  

__________________________
  
“All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

__________________________

   

Excerpted - from the Economist, Sept. 2012:

   

Women dominate university attendance around the world.

   

In South Korea more women than men pass the foreign-service exam, which has sparked the foreign ministry to implement a minimum quota for men.      In Brazil nearly a third of women earn more than their husbands, a phenomenon that has caused men to form church support-groups calling themselves “Men of Tears”.     Ms Rosin, an editor at Atlantic, whose book grew out of an article she wrote for the magazine in 2010, highlights how women today are excelling, while men founder.     As part of her research, she travelled to many corners of America, including Auburn-Opelika, Alabama, where women’s median income is 40% higher than men’s.       

The financial crisis has been especially unkind to men: three-quarters of the 7.5m American jobs lost in the recession belonged to men and were in traditionally masculine industries, such as construction, manufacturing and finance.

   

“Probably no one has had their wife move up the ladder as far as I’ve moved down,” says one man.     Another, who is annoyed that his girlfriend earns more than he does, complains, “All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

  

__________________________

  

The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.

__________________________

    


Ms Rosin highlights the deterioration of the male-in-the-workplace condition.

    

The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.       Only about 3% of men have taken over raising children full-time while their wives support their families.       Instead, many men, especially young ones, have retreated into a world of video games, drinking and prolonged adolescence—a phenomenon identified in “Guyland”, a 2008 book by an American sociologist, Michael Kimmel.

 

Read the full post here.


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Storytelling Makes Us Better in Life and in Business

Storytelling Makes Us Better in Life and in Business | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it
I put myself in the category of a motivational speaker, but I consider myself nothing more than a storyteller. And I don't think anything more is needed. Because if you have the ability to tell a powerful value-filled story, then it will ...

 

What a wonderful inspirational read for today, the day of Thanksgiving. If you want a jolt of heartfulness about stories in business, then this short article is for you.

 

Behind all the story and marketing, sales, biz growth activities lies the heart. Storytelling -- whether in business or on the stage -- is heart work because that is ultimately where stories touch us. At least for me it is.

 

I believe most of us doing this work with business storytelling come from this heart place because we know that sharing stories brings out the best in people. Because that is what we want more of. And that is what this article is really all about.

 

And I love at the end that the author Kelly Swanson says her post contains a lot of information and not story, and promises to do better. Doesn't this happen to all of us?! So thanks Kelly for the refreshing admission. We are right there with you :)

 

Enjoy this lovely piece, and thanks Kelly!

 

Link to original article:http://motivational-speakers-review.com/2012/11/21/storytelling-2/the-value-of-storytelling-in-life-and-in-business ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Chantal Sim's curator insight, May 15, 2013 12:38 AM

I like Kelly's blog because she shares many effective tips to be a motivational speaker. To be a great storyteller, I think I have to be more careful about daily life to be better and 'storious'. I actually made the word, 'storious' by myself to expressing the idea of make something possibly great to talk about.  Be storious!

Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:26 PM
Love the new word Chantal! Yes, being more 'storious' keeps us all improving our storytelling :)
Chantal Sim's comment, June 6, 2013 11:57 AM
Thank you, Mrs.Dietz! You encourage me all the time :D
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The Last Brochure You’ll Ever Need -- Story Works

The Last Brochure You’ll Ever Need -- Story Works | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

"Have you ever looked at your marketing materials and thought, “that’s not really me?” Been there. In fact, my (thankfully last) resume comes to mind. And, oddly, my mind wandered a bit, thinking how most marketing materials similarly fail to tell us what’s really unique about a brand."

 

Well, I am embarrassed to admit this, but the author of Story Works, Sharlene Sones, asked me to review her new e-book months ago -- and I am just now getting to it. My apologies Sharlene! But better late than never I guess.

 

I love this book. For several reasons:


Size & readabililty -- this book is constructed so you can easily flip through it. And it is laid out so it is easy to read and digest. Perfect! I can't tell you how many posts and e-books I ignore because the layout makes it too hard to read. And I wouldn't want to subject you to that either. Sharlene's book is a breeze to walk through.

 

Content -- Sharlene does a masterful job at guiding us through the business applications of story. She touches on everything from marketing/branding, unique proposition, sales, to leadership, culture, career development, and back. Whew! That's a lot of territory to cover. But she does it well.

 

Sharlene explains how story will make a difference in these areas -- and WHY it does. And she gives us tips for using story in several applications. As a bonus, there are lots of story quotes to add to your list, along with examples from companies to make her points.

 

What I particularly like is her focus on story as conversation -- and that story sharing is where the real leverage is in org story work.

 

I may quibble a bit on some of Sharlene's points -- are testimonials really stories? Depends on the definition you use. For me, not so much. But the bulk of Sharlene's material is so right on, I am not going to be so picky.

 

Sharlene also tackles 'engagement' as a topic and brings to light the story dynamics involved in that. I think there is still a lot to learn about storytelling and engagement in business, but this gives us a good start.

 

I wish there had been more focus on listening, too. Implied in Sharlene's book is how transformative stories can be in business. A lot of what she talks about is story at the transactional level -- even when story provides inspiration and meaning. For example -- when a business is really in the story groove, stories have the potential to change both the teller and listener. Story as transformation in business is the next frontier I think.

 

I could say more, but I'm running out of space. This book is inspirational and a good kick in the pants for bringing story into your core business activities. If you want a great e-book primer on business storytelling, this is it.

 

If you want to go deeper, dig into the books by Annette Simmons and Steve Denning.

 

You do have to buy this book. But you can also download a chapter for free. I have absolutely no affiliation with Sharlene other than we are colleagues and both went to grad school at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.

 

Happy reading!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

 


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Strategic Storytelling | Business Truisms

Strategic Storytelling | Business Truisms | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it
Every so often, a traditionally non-business word finds its way into the business world, fueled by an admirable desire to find new ways to think about old challenges. “Storytelling” has become one of those words.

 

What a nicely written article pointing to several truisms in business storytelling. Some you are familiar with (storytelling is a pull, not a push technology). I like the ones that I don't read much about:
1. Storytelling is a selfless, empowering act
2. Storytelling looks to the future

 

As the author Bill Baker (from Marketing Profs) says, "Successful storytelling respects the past and appreciates the present, but it also looks boldly into the future, moving people past “what is” to “what if?” Done well, storytelling helps people collectively imagine a vision of the future that is achievable and worth achieving, helping them to understand not only what they’re working on but also what they’re working toward." Yes!

 

And, "As you consider using storytelling strategically to give meaning to your brand communications or employee-engagement efforts, don’t do so simply because it is “the next big thing.” Do it because, if you truly listen and you are willing to be generous, authentic, emotional, and collectively creative— it works. As one senior client recently said, “This is a bit frightening. I feel vulnerable; but at the same time, because I’m being myself, I feel more confident.” If your organization is ready for that journey, there’s a great story ahead."

 

Love it. This is a quick post that is rich in insights & examples (ignore its clunky layout). Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | Mobile Websites vs Mobile Apps | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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