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10 Responsive web design examples in action - YouTube

Examples of responsive web design sites, showing how they transform at different sizes. Full blog post: http://www.thehopkinsonreport.com/2013/02/thr-224-10-...
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Quick whistletop tour through some approaches to responsive design. Nice and simple.

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Are You Meeting All Five Moments of Learning Need? by Conrad Gottfredson & Bob Mosher : Learning Solutions Magazine

Are You Meeting All Five Moments of Learning Need? by Conrad  Gottfredson & Bob  Mosher : Learning Solutions Magazine | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it
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Apparently a well-known model that, I have to admit, I hadn't heard of before. It's presented in this months "E-learning Age" magazine as an approach to mobile learning; they suggest that the first two moments are delivered to a fully-featured (read 'big-screened') desktop browser with the following three available on mobile. Whichever way you might use it - it provides questions likely to produce insightful responses to help form a L&D strategy.
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Mobile learning - Jisc infoNet

Mobile learning - Jisc infoNet | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it
Jisc infoNet helps organisations in the Higher Education and Further Education and Skills sectors to operate effectively, get best value for money and deliver excellent quality learning, teaching and research.
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The usual high-quality approach from JISC. I like the section on Frameworks which presents alternatvies to the normally-content-heavy approach.

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Mobile Learning: Transforming Education, Engaging Students, and Improving ... - Brookings Institution

Mobile Learning: Transforming Education, Engaging Students, and Improving ... - Brookings Institution | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it

After more than two years since the FDA first published its draft guidance on how it regulates mobile medical applications, the agency announced this morning that it had published its final guidance on the regulation of mobile medical apps. 

 

Notably, the FDA published its final guidance document just before the end of September, which would have marked the end of the agency’s fiscal year. At the congressional hearings earlier this year, the FDA more or less promised to get the guidance out before the end of its fiscal year.

 

The overall message from the FDA has not changed much since it first published its draft guidance — the final document is nonbinding and explanatory in nature. It also focuses on a small subset of medical apps “that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended,” the agency wrote in a press release.

 

The two broad categories of apps that the FDA regulates, according to the final guidance, are:


1. are intended to be used as an accessory to a regulated medical device – for example, an application that allows a health care professional to make a specific diagnosis by viewing a medical image from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) on a smartphone or a mobile tablet; or


2. transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device – for example, an application that turns a smartphone into an electrocardiography (ECG) machine to detect abnormal heart rhythms or determine if a patient is experiencing a heart attack.

 

 Read more at : http://mobihealthnews.com/25694/fda-finally-publishes-final-guidance-for-mobile-medical-apps/
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Opinion: Five myths about Moocs

Opinion: Five myths about Moocs | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it
Diana Laurillard explains why a model based on unsupervised learning is not the answer
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Some lazy thinking and obvious (though accurate) points about MOOC's from Diana Laurillard. "Education is not a mass customer industry"??? Come visit us in the gutters from your tower sometime.

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Africa’s mobile phone e-learning transformation

Africa’s mobile phone e-learning transformation | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it

After more than two years since the FDA first published its draft guidance on how it regulates mobile medical applications, the agency announced this morning that it had published its final guidance on the regulation of mobile medical apps. 

 

Notably, the FDA published its final guidance document just before the end of September, which would have marked the end of the agency’s fiscal year. At the congressional hearings earlier this year, the FDA more or less promised to get the guidance out before the end of its fiscal year.

 

The overall message from the FDA has not changed much since it first published its draft guidance — the final document is nonbinding and explanatory in nature. It also focuses on a small subset of medical apps “that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended,” the agency wrote in a press release.

 

The two broad categories of apps that the FDA regulates, according to the final guidance, are:


1. are intended to be used as an accessory to a regulated medical device – for example, an application that allows a health care professional to make a specific diagnosis by viewing a medical image from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) on a smartphone or a mobile tablet; or


2. transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device – for example, an application that turns a smartphone into an electrocardiography (ECG) machine to detect abnormal heart rhythms or determine if a patient is experiencing a heart attack.

 

 Read more at : http://mobihealthnews.com/25694/fda-finally-publishes-final-guidance-for-mobile-medical-apps/
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FDA finally publishes final guidance for mobile medical apps

FDA finally publishes final guidance for mobile medical apps | Mobile Learning | Scoop.it

After more than two years since the FDA first published its draft guidance on how it regulates mobile medical applications, the agency announced this morning that it had published its final guidance on the regulation of mobile medical apps. 

 

Notably, the FDA published its final guidance document just before the end of September, which would have marked the end of the agency’s fiscal year. At the congressional hearings earlier this year, the FDA more or less promised to get the guidance out before the end of its fiscal year.

 

The overall message from the FDA has not changed much since it first published its draft guidance — the final document is nonbinding and explanatory in nature. It also focuses on a small subset of medical apps “that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended,” the agency wrote in a press release.

 

The two broad categories of apps that the FDA regulates, according to the final guidance, are:


1. are intended to be used as an accessory to a regulated medical device – for example, an application that allows a health care professional to make a specific diagnosis by viewing a medical image from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) on a smartphone or a mobile tablet; or


2. transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device – for example, an application that turns a smartphone into an electrocardiography (ECG) machine to detect abnormal heart rhythms or determine if a patient is experiencing a heart attack.

 

 Read more at : http://mobihealthnews.com/25694/fda-finally-publishes-final-guidance-for-mobile-medical-apps/
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