Mobile Healthcare Apps
22 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Hovhannes
Scoop.it!

A Specialized and Structured EMR: Interview with Modernizing Medicine Co-Founder and CEO, Daniel Cane

A Specialized and Structured EMR: Interview with Modernizing Medicine Co-Founder and CEO, Daniel Cane | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
In large part due to 2009's Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, there has been a proliferation of electronic medic
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hovhannes
Scoop.it!

Top 6 Free Pharmacy Apps for Patients

Top 6 Free Pharmacy Apps for Patients | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
Medication adherence is a hot topic in health care because non-adherence costs the healthcare industry billions of d… (Which #pharmacy #apps are you recommending?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hovhannes
Scoop.it!

BEAPPER - An app for emergency clinicians - Bos...

BEAPPER - An app for emergency clinicians - Bos... | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
Bidirectional Electronic Alert Patient-Centered Provider Encounter Record —provides real time updates about patients to doctors and nurses in the Emergency Department.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients | Medical Economics

Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients | Medical Economics | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients


Via Philippe Loizon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

4 Top Mobile App Types for Healthcare Providers

4 Top Mobile App Types for Healthcare Providers | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

The barriers to creating mobile app are less daunting than they may seem. Big development budgets are not necessarily a prerequisite. In fact, many hospitals are doing really cool things in the mobile app space, without spending all of their marketing budgets. If you're considering a mobile app for your hospital or health system, take a look at four most prevalent types of apps for these organizations.


The number of health apps already available is staggering. There were 17,288 health and fitness apps and 14,558 medical apps on the market in mid-2012, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 

And they are spreading. According to Washington, D.C.-based eHealth Initiative, the number of smartphone apps increased 120% during the past year. All these apps are just keeping up with demand, since an estimated 27 million mobile phone users worldwide downloaded a health app in 2012, according to research firm Research2Guidance.


Things are changing fast. The FDA is currently moving to craft a framework to regulate and approve mobile health apps. In July 2012, the organization issued a draft guidance document for Mobile Medical Applications as part of its effort to "help clarify the types of mobile apps to which the FDA intends to apply its authority." 

Much of the FDA's guidance will likely be focused on more clinical apps, such as blood glucose monitors and apps containing radiological images, but its move toward regulation only further proves that health and healthcare apps are here to stay.

 

 




Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Do consumers want smartphone health apps ?

Do consumers want smartphone health apps ? | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

Smartphone apps have a high rate of dropouts with 26% being used only once and 74% being discontinued by the tenth use. A CHIC survey shows that the availability of a better app (34.4%) and lack of user friendliness (32.6%) are the top reasons for discontinuation of smartphone apps.  However what the survey isn’t showing is that some people do not like to be reminded that they have a health condition that needs monitoring.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:55 AM

Some very interesting observations in this article.

Rescooped by Hovhannes from Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
Scoop.it!

Want to Manage Your Diabetes? There's an App for That - Knowledge@Wharton

Want to Manage Your Diabetes? There's an App for That - Knowledge@Wharton | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

Want to Manage Your Diabetes? There's an App for That by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

During the first annual Connected Health Symposium at the University of Pennsylvania in April, faculty members and entrepreneurs spent a day showcasing new mobile tools that patients can use to communicate with their physicians, chart their progress reaching health goals and interact with other people who are facing similar medical challenges. This is the essence of the connected health movement -- a groundswell of mobile apps, wireless devices, and websites designed to bring patients together with the people who want to keep them healthy. The symposium ended with a provocative question posed by Ralph Muller, CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System: "But do consumers want to be so connected?"

 

Entrepreneurs are betting the answer to that question will be "absolutely." But they're facing a host of challenges: The U.S. Food & Drug Administration is preparing to release guidelines for mobile medical apps that could require some companies to seek the agency's approval for their products before can go to market. Even if firms clear those regulatory hurdles, designing the gizmos so they appeal to tech-averse types, such as the elderly, will be far from straight forward. "I do think the big challenge, once the technology has been created and approved, is going to be focusing on behavior change in high-risk populations," notes Kevin Volpp, Wharton professor of health care management, who also spoke at the symposium. As for whether patients want to be so connected, Volpp says, "Some do and some don't, and that's part of the challenge."


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
more...
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 2013 5:13 PM

An emerging area of #digital consumer behavior--#connected #healthcare from Kowledge@Wharton.

Rescooped by Hovhannes from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Mobile "Apps" and Tablets Take Over Clinical Trials

Mobile "Apps" and Tablets Take Over Clinical Trials | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

The mobile and “apps” market has been growing rapidly and steadily for the past few years. With the introduction of the iPad in 2010, the tablet market is gaining attention as product value soars in many industries. Health and pharmaceuticals is one of those industries openly accepting the mobile and tablet takeover as these devices and their “apps” bring added benefit and new innovative solutions. In a follow up to last week’s post,Arithmos discusses the market and how devices are being integrated. 


The pharmaceutical industry has been embracing these markets for several reasons. One of the biggest reasons is patient compliance. Patients want the “WOW Factor ” – the digital and personalized experience.

 

Devices such as tablets and smartphones can cut clinical trial costs as well. Setting up desktops or laptops, or even printing paper, can be more expensive than simply downloading information on a device. Using these devices also allows patients to just send information via click or an IM/SMS. With the installation of  ”apps”, medical information can be downloaded instantly by doctors or Investigators.

 


Via nrip
more...
rickyle balea's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:23 AM

This article will demonstrate that, mobile apps are aleady, and in the future, might completly revolutionise the meadical and Pharmacautical industry

Alex Shirlaw's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:51 AM

This is another perfect example of how mobile apps are revolutionising the way in which we use mobile technology to our advantage. This article mentions the fact that utilising this kind of technology is more cost efficient because it can run the clinical trials on the device instead of manually conducting them on paper. This is ironic because it creates a twist on the classic saying that 'more is less' when in fact this clearly demonstartes that this kind of technology delivers more results with less effort and cost needed.

Scooped by Hovhannes
Scoop.it!

14 Statistics on Clinicians and Mobile Device Usage

14 Statistics on Clinicians and Mobile Device Usage | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
The vast majority of clinicians use mobile devices in their day-to-day practice (Reading @beckershr 14 Statistics on Clinicians and Mobile Device Usage http://t.co/Gw8FFzWNO2)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hovhannes
Scoop.it!

What are the best fitness mobile apps and why?

What are the best fitness mobile apps and why? | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
Lauren Kanaskie responded to the question with... (What are the best fitness mobile apps and why? Answer on @klout #Fitness http://t.co/PMK9D3c0Q7)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from Patient Hub
Scoop.it!

Significant mobile health growth predicted in next 4 years

Significant mobile health growth predicted in next 4 years | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
The trend could be slowed, however, as app developers await regulatory guidance from the FDA.

Via Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Mobile Healthcare Faces The Future [Infographic]

Mobile Healthcare Faces The Future [Infographic] | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

The Mobile Revolution continues to change how industry after industry goes about day-to-day business. Yet one industry has been surprisingly slow to embrace the benefits of mobile: healthcare. Many observers find that strange, since healthcare could clearly benefit from the power of smartphones and tablets attached to the cloud.


Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from #ALS AWARENESS #LouGehrigsDisease #PARKINSONS
Scoop.it!

Apple launches dedicated ‘Apps for Healthcare Professionals’ collection

Apple launches dedicated ‘Apps for Healthcare Professionals’ collection | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it
Apple launches dedicated 'Apps for Healthcare Professionals' collection

Via TEAM Mike Lopez Memorial Foundation |Find us on Twitter:@TEAMCUREALS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hovhannes from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

How The iPad Has Revolutionized Healthcare

How The iPad Has Revolutionized Healthcare | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

Just three years since its launch date Apple's iPad can be credited for changing the face of modern healthcare in many ways

 

BYOD


The iPad has also sparked a new BYOD trend in the healthcare arena, giving physicians and healthcare executives the ability to work efficiently on a device of their choice. Famed for its usability the iPad has also encourage many physicians to engage with online tools, making patient communication much more efficient. 

 

Mass App Uptake


The birth of the iPad has also led to a huge increase in the number of mHealth apps. Before, healthcare professionals and executives had limited access to a small number of software solutions, which were accessible from either a desktop or laptop computer only. Today, solutions from EHR to financing, HR to medical information can all be accessed on the move and synced with a number of different devices.

 

Healthcare In The Cloud


As the iPad has risen in popularity so has the popularity of cloud-based mHealth apps and software solutions. Many hospitals and healthcare institutions now store important information securely in the cloud, so it is accessible from a number of portable devices both on and off site. This level of accessibility – while it comes with its own set of security concerns - has proven to be hugely beneficial in the healthcare sector.


Mobile Healthcare

 

As well as sharing information, accessing healthcare records and interacting with patients, the iPad has also facilitated a number of innovative patient / doctor communication systems that have helped save time, money and resources within the sector, namely the iRobot and virtual doctors offices, that allow patients to communicate with doctors face to face whilst being in different locations. This technology has also made dramatic improvements to healthcare facilities in rural locations and developing countries.


Via nrip
more...
IT-Lyftet och IT-Piloterna's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:39 AM

Hur iPad:en har revolutionerat hälso- och sjukvården - intressant artikel

Rescooped by Hovhannes from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet)

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet) | Mobile Healthcare Apps | Scoop.it

For most of time medicine was a guessing game. Doctors, or witch doctors, or shaman would inspect a patient, stir a potion and hope it would work. With some notable exceptions, modern medicine isn't so different. The data collection—blood pressure, heart rate, weight, reflexes—is largely rudimentary. We're getting by, but technology can take us so much further.

 

Even technology that fits in your pocket.

 

In the past year or two (or three) iPhones and iPads have been a fixture in doctors' offices around the world. Why carry a clipboard when you could pull up records via Wi-Fi and type the information directly into the patient's medical record? Perhaps even more powerful is the idea that these devices can be collecting data all the time.

 

Smartphones are incredibly powerful tools for anything as simple as data mining to something so sophisticated as measuring a patient's sleeping pattern. There are apps that can help regulate your mental health, apps that can help you keep track of what and how much you eat. There are apps that can take your blood pressure and you blood sugar. There are even apps that help you cope with aging.

 

While an app can't cure a disease, some of the newer, more experimental medical apps can do truly extraordinary things. This technology can not only help you feel better; it can prevent illness by spotting symptoms early on.

 


Via nrip
more...
nancygabor's comment, June 5, 2013 1:07 PM
Collecting data is one thing, understanding what it means and when to bring concerns to your doctor is another. if the smart phone is the glove, the hand is health literacy... they have to go together. Early adopters are likely to have better health literacy early on, but to gain the full benefits of sensor technologies in mobile consumer devices, we need to make interpretive information available to patients. We also need to reimburse physicians for the time they spend trawling through patient data. Dominique is an unusual leading thinker... most docs don't trawl without a real incentive.
nrip's comment, June 6, 2013 5:44 PM
Tools made from data are helping doctors, patients and healthstaff who are willing to be helped. With time tools will improve as those who are building them will mature in their techno-medical skills. As doctors learn to accommodate these tools in their practices, they will mature in their understanding of how tools can be used to improve outcomes as well as improve paradigms of care.
IT-Lyftet och IT-Piloterna's curator insight, June 17, 2013 2:53 AM

Kan "smarta prylar" ersätta doktorer? Nä, naturligtvis inte, men det finns mycket att vinna på att rutinmässiga undersökningar kan utföras med hjälp av små, tekniska hjälpmedel, och utvecklingen går snabbt framåt.