Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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DOTmed News - 3 health care decisions to watch for in 2012

DOTmed News - 3 health care decisions to watch for in 2012 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

3 health care decisions to watch for in 2012

December 27, 2011

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor

Many doctors are hoping that Congress finally delivers the fatal blow to the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula next year. Last week, after some last-minute political wrangling, Congress passed a bill that includes a two-month freeze on the 27 percent Medicare reimbursement cut to physicians that was scheduled to go in effect in January, courtesy of the SGR. But come March, these cuts will loom again.

Congress has kicked this billion dollar can (fully repealing the SGR is thought to cost about $300 billion) down the road so many times in the past that maybe it's unreasonable to expect anything to change in the next 12 months.

However, politicians have made some moves indicating that they might (might!) be serious this time. For instance, last week, Democrats appointed Rep. Allyson Schwartz, from Pennsylvania, to a House-Senate committee that among other problems will look at how to fix the SGR, The Hill newspaper reports. And Schwartz is the author of an SGR fix, which she proposed to the ill-fated "super committee" earlier in the fall.

True, the American Medical Association didn't much like her ideas. And it's unclear what doctors can expect to come out of a largely gridlocked Washington in the near future. But whatever happens with the SGR, 2012 promises a number of fairly big policy decisions for health care. We've come up with a list of three to keep an eye on:

1. Health reform's fate

Is the Affordable Care Act, the signature domestic policy victory of the Obama administration, constitutional? It depends who you ask. In November, a D.C. appeals court upheld the law. But earlier this year, an Atlanta appeals court struck down part of it. The fault line for many is the individual mandate, which requires citizens to get health insurance by 2014 or face penalties. But judges also disagree on whether the law can even be ruled on yet: another appeals court, in Cincinnati, said because the mandate was, in effect, a tax, for legal reasons nothing could be decided until it first takes effect in 2014. With appeals courts split, it's now time for the Supreme Court to weigh in. The court said it has set aside three days to hear arguments at the end of March; a ruling is expected over the summer. Stay tuned: This could be the most divisive judgment since 2001's Bush vs. Gore.

2. How the FDA will regulate mobile devices

The future of health care is becomingly increasingly mobile, so the Food and Drug Administration now has to reckon with a lot of new gadgets falling under its purview. This summer, the agency released draft guidance on how it plans to regulate mobile devices, like smartphones health care apps. Mostly, the FDA says it intends to focus on only a small fraction of devices and programs cluttering the App Store: those that function as an accessory to something already regulated, such as an app that lets radiologists access a PACS server to see images to make a diagnosis; and those that turn the product into a real medical device, such as a smartphone that takes ECG readings. However, the mobile health industry has some worries. In a slew of comments sent to the agency this fall, stakeholders have fretted about a number of points. For one, they worry the language the regulations are written in is too jargon-filled for developers who tend not have a lot of experience with the FDA's technical prose. Also, they're afraid the FDA's proposals lack proper risk analysis so the regulations only concentrate on the most potentially harmful applications. We'll see how the FDA deals with the feedback soon, as final rules are expected next year.

3. A new way to understand Alzheimer's

There is a gold standard for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease, but the problem is it first requires the patient to be dead. Doctors can't exactly cut open your brain to check for beta-amyloid plaques and tangles while you're still alive. This is partly why there's so much excitement around a handful of in-the-works PET imaging agents that can measure, noninvasively, your brain's plaque load. Now, they can't "diagnose" Alzheimer's, but they could, at least, help rule it out and add another useful weapon to a doctor's diagnostic arsenal. Of the PET agents in development, Eli Lilly's florbetapir F18, also called Amyvid, is probably the furthest along, regulatory-wise. Lilly has already filed with the Food and Drug Administration. However, the first go around for Lilly's product didn't end so well -- this spring, the agency rejected the drug because of concerns over user training. But Lilly says they've made some corrections and have re-filed, and expect some sort of response from the FDA by the middle of next year. No one can say for sure it will be positive, but Lilly's not alone in this game. GE is also said to be working through plans with its agent, flutemetamol, and they expect to seek FDA approval by the end of this year -- meaning they, too, could expect some news in 2012.

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Economist Intelligence Unit: The Future of Healthcare in Europe 2030

Economist Intelligence Unit: The Future of Healthcare in Europe 2030 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
"2030 EU Future of Healthcare" is a white paper released in April by the Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceutical (a JnJ company).

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Why Aetna acquired iTriage app maker Healthagen | mobihealthnews

Why Aetna acquired iTriage app maker Healthagen | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Aetna has acquired mobile health startup, Healthagen, developer of the popular health app iTriage, for an undisclosed sum. The acquisition marks one of the first exits for a high profile mobile health startup.Aetna is also leveraging the mobile application in its accountable care organization (ACO) offering, where it will be a key component for consumer engagement, Aetna executives said during an investor day presentation this week. (More on how iTriage fits into that offering in the graphic at the end of this article).

 

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FDA Experts: Legal Guidance on Telehealth

FDA Experts: Legal Guidance on Telehealth | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Experts at the FDA have released a great resource for telemedicine developers throughout the country. The goal is to help the industry at large to guide their users and vendors understand the regulatory framework within which telehealth may fall. As the FDA progresses in developing their rules, this will become more and more important.

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ATA proposed bill could save Medicaid $180M

ATA proposed bill could save Medicaid $180M | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A legislative proposal developed by the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) to expand the use of telemedicine for Medicaid beneficiaries with neonatal healthcare needs could save the federal government approximately $186 million over 10...
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Keynote: Health professionals have to lead mHealth market, Latest Videos | Mobile World Live

Keynote: Health professionals have to lead mHealth market, Latest Videos | Mobile World Live | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Professor Krishnan Ganapathy, president of India's Apollo Telemedicine Networking Foundation, warned that “mobile health can never, ever, be set to take off unless it is integrated into the core of the healthcare delivery system in our country,” during his keynote at this year’s GSMA-mHA Mobile Health Summit. Crucial to this is the need to generate traction among healthcare professionals, with Ganapathy arguing that healthcare providers should be “first among equals” in the mobile healthcare ecosystem. However, he also argued that the needs of patients must be central to the discussion.

[Video]

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Pesinet: Mobile Monitoring and Micro-Insurance for Children in Mali | MobileActive.org

Pesinet: Mobile Monitoring and Micro-Insurance for Children in Mali | MobileActive.org | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Pesinet: Mobile Monitoring and Micro-Insurance for Children in Mali

Posted by AnneryanHeatwole on Dec 19, 2011

Mali has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world. There are roughly 111 deaths for every 1000 live births in the country and the under-5 mortality rate is 191 out of every 1000 children. The need for early detection of diseases and stronger local health structures led to the creation of Pesinet, a non-profit that uses mobile technology to provide regular health checkups and affordable health insurance for young children in Mali's capital, Bamako.

Roughly 600 children are currently enrolled in the program in the neighborhood of Bamako Coura, under the care of four Pesinet agents (each covering around 150 children). Pesinet combines both early warning systems and insurance. Families pay 500 CF a month for each enrolled child; the payments cover doctor examinations and half the cost of any medications the child needs if he or she gets sick.

Enrolled children are tested weekly for symptoms of illness such as fever, cough, diarrhea, low weight, or vomiting by community health workers who enter data from each visit into a custom-designed Java application on their phone. The data is sent via GPRS to an online database. Doctors at local community health centers monitor the patient data for sudden changes in health. If changes occur, the community health workers receive an alert on their phones and then go back, in turn, to alert the family that the doctor needs to give the child a checkup.

Pesinet's Lucie de Clerk recently contributed to an ICT4CHW (ICT for Community Health Workers) discussion. She writes, "The ICT system we use has been fully designed by us. It enables remote follow-up of children, keeping of medical records, and production of activity reports and health statistics. It is thus used for medical as well as management purposes."

De Clerck estimates that it takes the community health workers about ten minutes to complete each child's check-up and record the data. Only children that need immediate attention are contacted after the data is reviewed by the health center doctors, so the field workers only have to take action if something is wrong.

The organization is working to become self-sustaining through enrollments but is currently still partially dependent on funds raised outside of the insurance program. De Clerck writes "Our first aim was to achieve local operational self-financing, i.e monthly subscription fees covering the running costs of the service. Experience shows that we are able to achieve 50%, while the other 50% are currently covered by the funds we raise. We have yet to find a sustainable economic model."

De Clerck says that the community health workers adopted the technology quickly; she attributes the rapid pickup to a simple design and the relatively small amount of data collected. However, the organization has faced network connectivity issues which has resulted in the fieldworkers keeping separate, paper-based records and limiting the real-time usefulness of the program. This would also limit the use of Pesinet in more rural areas where network connectivity is weaker and Internet connections less reliable than in the capital (as the doctors at health centers need Internet access to view the data from the field workers). The organization is currently working on new specifications for its technology so that the application will be less reliant on mobile and web connectivity.

Another challenge was creating demand among beneficiaries, as insurance and preventative medicine are not very prevalent in Mali. So Pesinet and the field workers have to promote the idea of paying for non-sick children as a precaution against future illnesses. However, among the families of the 600 children who have been enrolled since the program launched, satisfaction rates are high.

A survey of participating families found that the service has been well received by beneficiaries so far; 94% reported satisfaction with Pesinet, 97% of participating families called the service "very affordable", and participating health centers have seen a 37% increase in visits through Pesinet subscribers.

For an in-depth look at Pesinet, check out our case study on the project, or listen to Pesinet co-founder Anne Roos-Weil describe the project in this video from the MobileActive Mobiles for Women Tech Salon.

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HealthVault + Mobile = “AWESOME”

HealthVault + Mobile = “AWESOME” | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
“I am stunned at how many folks have already installed our brand new HealthVault app for Windows Phone. Forget any questions I may have had about the momentum of the mobile platforms; this is where the world is going”

Sean Nolan, Chief Architect, Health Solutions Group, Microsoft Corporation

Note: if you are a patient with a HealthVault account in the UK or Ireland you can use it during consults with 3G Doctor as all our Doctors have been trained to use the platform. Simply add your HealthVault data information instead of your “NHS Number” details.

In 2012 (as we announced at the mHealth Summit last week) 3G Doctor will be integrated within the HealthVault platform so this experience will be much more seamless and we’ll also be launching in some other international markets so more HealthVault customers can experience “The Doctor Can See You Now”.

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Doctor or patient? Who will drive mHealth? | Healthcare IT News

Doctor or patient? Who will drive mHealth? | Healthcare IT News | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON – Who’s more important to the advancement of mHealth – the physician or the patient?

To Krishnan Ganapathy, of the Apollo Telemedicine Networking Foundation in India, the answer quite clearly is the physician – and he’s quite sure that all this new technology and all these new services won’t be accepted by people unless it’s all recommended by their physicians first. But to Joseph Kvedar of Partners Healthcare’s Center for Connected Health, the future of mHealth may lie with the patient.

[See also: Mobile tech popular, but governance gaps remain, says HIMSS]“I think there is a role for automated coaching and maybe, maybe, the doctor isn’t the center of the universe,” he said.

Ganapathy and Kvedar were two members of a five-person panel at the mHealth Summit in Washington D.C. for Tuesday morning’s Super Session, titled “Mobile Health in the Clinical Enterprise.” In an hour-long session taken up almost entirely by each panelist’s opening remarks, the conversation centered primarily on how mHealth initiatives can be advanced, and who should do the advancing.

Ganapathy’s argument focuses on his native country of India, which holds one-sixth of the world’s population but where “mHealth is conspicuous by its absence.” He said primary care physicians aren’t adopting mHealth because it might hurt their business, and the general public won’t adopt it unless their doctors tell them to.

[See also: 11 'inspiring' mhealth innovators emerge from competition]“Unless the general practitioner is incentivized he isn’t going to fall in love with mHealth,” Ganpathy added. “The ordinary physician is yet to be excited by this fancy new tool. … Is it possible that the mobile phone is perceived as a threat?”

Ganpathy said mHealth initiatives need to focus on the human being rather than the technology – the health, rather than the ‘m.’ There are more mHealth pilots than there are pilots in the American and Indian air forces, he added, because the emphasis isn’t on the physician or the patient, but the technology.

“Good healthcare is not ordering pizza on a mobile phone,” he concluded.

Kvedar took a different view. “Our patients are our biggest untapped resource,” he said, outlining “an exciting new frontier” that focuses on patient-centered care. He argued that mHealth initiatives are moving toward improving the lines and levels of communication between physicians and their patients, so that the patient can be empowered to take care of his or her own health.

In that sense, he said, the physician would be part of a network but not at its center.

Another point of view was offered by Eric Yablonka, of the University of Chicago Medical Center, who took the CIO’s side.

“CIOs are at the forefront of transforming healthcare inside and outside of the medical enterprise,” he said, so they’re at the top of the decision-making process. Of mHealth, he pointed out: “We all talk about it, we’re all excited about it, but actually has to work.”

For mHealth initiatives to succeed, he said, providers, payers and legislators have to develop a reference architecture for connectivity, a business model for connectivity beyond the hospital’s walls and a proven testing and certification process for devices.

Rounding out the panel were Donna Ramos-Johnson, of the District of Columbia Primary Care Association, and Russell Glasgow, of the National Cancer Institute. Both brought the conversation back to the ability of mHealth to affect healthcare on an individual level.

Ramos-Johnson agreed with Ganpathy that physicians need to be incentivized to adopt mHealth, but patients also have to be incentivized. To do this, she said, mobile health tools need to be made accessible, relevant, inexpensive and culturally sensitive.

Glasgow said mobile health tools, particularly apps, hold great promise for the nation’s 11 million to 12 million cancer survivors in that they enable the patient to make new connections in healthcare – to the doctor, to a network of specialists, and to others who have or have had cancer.

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Five Ways mHealth Can Decrease Hospital Readmissions

Five Ways mHealth Can Decrease Hospital Readmissions | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Five Ways mHealth Can Decrease Hospital Readmissions

Posted on December 16, 2011

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Patients who are discharged from the hospital after a heart attack, congestive heart failure, or pneumonia have high rates of short-term readmissions. As per a provision in the Affordable Care Act, a Medicare patient with one of these diagnoses who is readmitted within 30 days for the same will trigger a denial of reimbursement for the subsequent admission. There are many things which need to change to limit these events, though not all readmissions can be prevented, as nothing in medicine is absolute. Identification and intensive interventions (inpatient and post-discharge) with high risk patients, better communication/care coordination, discharge processes, and patient education have been shown to produce results. I would make a case for mHealth to become an integral part of all these components of a multi-faceted solution . here are a few ways that mHealth may be incorporated in the process:

The use of bioinformatics to determine the patient’s low, moderate, or high risk of readmission can be put into a hospital app to be shared among members of a multidisciplinary transitional team, which will formulate a discharge and post-discharge plan based on this data, while rounding on the patient daily.Bedside computer tablets can be used by nurses and other providers utilizing one of the good patient education tools available. The patient and caregiver may continue to have access to these programs at home, and tracking of the time spent with these programs can be used to study the correlation between this education and discharge instruction adherence.Mobile apps with cloud-based patient portals may be shared with the primary care physician and post-hospital institutions (nursing/assisted living, rehab, LTAC, etc) at the time of discharge, with follow-up appointments made with providers with the same program.Mobile technologies for instruction and medication adherence may be activated with the patient and caregiver prior to discharge. This will involve the caregiver before the last minute, as well as decreasing anxiety related to a hurried discharge process.Telehealth conferencing with expert providers/extenders to supplement remote sensor monitoring would benefit patients at high risk for readmission.

This is a simplistic description of a complex disruption of hospital culture. The above ideas are neither new nor solely my own. 90% of hospitals say they are aware of and addressing the issue of readmissions. However, few hospitals are attacking this issue in a concerted and comprehensive fashion. Significant changes in the utilization of personnel, investment in technology, and a commitment to making the patient the center of healthcare are imperative for success of not only preventing readmissions, but of care in general.
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5 mobile trends for 2012 | Healthcare IT News

At the third annual mHealth Summit in Washington D.C., major players in the mobile arena noted the impact mobile phones and other devices have and will continue to have both in the US and across the globe. Paul Jacobs, chairman and CEO of Qualcomm, the closing keynote speaker at the mHealth Summit, predicted nearly 4 billion smart phones would be sold between now and 2014.

“The mobile device in your hand gives you access to all of humanity’s collective knowledge," he said. "We’re going to see the full computer environment coming over. Over the next year, really cool stuff is coming.”

Brian Edwards, mHealth feature editor at iMedicalApps, agreed. We asked him to highlight five mobile trends to look for in 2012.

1.Apps that track patient activity. Edwards said the ability to track patient data on a phone will have many benefits in the year to come. “How many phone calls they take, where they are, and ... their activity level" can be "surefire" indicators of patients' conditions, he said. “Especially with chronic conditions like diabetes; when there’s a flare-up, it’s integral to know when … it’s like a check-engine light for the body.” On his blog, Edwards explained how apps of this nature can be beneficial for other patient subsets, like autistic children. For example, body sensor technology has been developed to detect and record signs of stress in children, “by measuring slight electrical changes in the skin,” Edwards wrote. “Since autistic children have a difficult time expressing or even understanding their emotions, teachers and caregivers can have a difficult time anticipating and preventing meltdowns.”

2.Binary network apps. Binary network apps, or apps that track peripheral devices, will possibly be the biggest trend in 2012, said Edwards. “I think that’s going to be something that’ll be the first big business in mobile health,” he said. “Wearable censors, or apps that fit into the diagnostic process in an ambulatory setting. It’s the ability to take the iPhone and a patient with a T-shirt with a built-in censor and keep track of their vitals all day.” This enables techs and caregivers to “see triggers,” said Edwards, while the app sends an alarm depending on a predetermined threshold for the patient. “It’s powerful,” he added.

3.Health-focused games. “Everyone’s trying to game-ify everything,” said Edwards. He referenced Games for Health, which uses games and gaming technology to improve health and healthcare. Organizations such as the University of Southern California have also studied turning simple games into “stealth health,” said Edwards – and had success doing so. “People love to play games – it’s something across all ages and it’s more enjoyable. If the questions are in the form of a funny little game, and you don’t even realize you’re answering the questions you’re answering, it’s going to be easier to answer the question and comply."

4.Apps that diagnose and treat patients. On his blog, Edwards mentioned a number of start-ups making progress in developing innovative body area network (BAN) technologies. For example, a device aimed at more efficient EEG data collection uses a miniature electronics box attached to a light, head harness, and electrodes to monitor a patient while he/she sleeps. "The device has HIPAA compliant security for easy transfer of data via the Internet,” he added. A similar tool, designed for the diagnosing and monitoring of epileptic patients, allows for continuous brain wave monitoring. “The patient app guides the user through the application of the body worn sensors, which can currently include up to 16-channels of EEG data. Once the patient has applied the body worn sensors, they simply pair the sensors and peripheral device via Bluetooth with the app and go about their day while the data is continuously captured and sent to remote server,” Edwards wrote.

5.Apps that empower patients. Tools that help consumers make health-related decisions will be popular in the upcoming years. On his blog, Edwards documented apps that take publicly available information from government and non-profit grounds and divide it into categories, such as healthcare facilities, medical suppliers and prescription drugs. “Using the phone’s geo-location, an individual can enter his or her ZIP code and find provider facilities in their area,” he wrote. “By utilizing the Center for Medicare and Medicaid’s Hospital Compared database, users can review ratings for all facilities, details on quality of care and patient services, as well as what coverage is provided for Medicare and Medicaid recipients.”

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Almost half of healthcare organizations do not take steps to protect mobile devices

Almost half of healthcare organizations do not take steps to protect mobile devices | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Widespread use of mobile devices by physicians is putting patient data at risk according to a Ponemon Institute survey.
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Remote patient monitors slim down but adoption still low | mobihealthnews

Remote patient monitors slim down but adoption still low | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Only 50,000 to 70,000 patients in the United States are remotely monitored, Chuck Parker, executive director of the Continua Health Alliance, told the New York Times in a recent interview. Parker states that one reason adoption is still modest is a lack of financial incentives for some of the big players in health. Heart patients that can be monitored remotely at home are far less lucrative than those occupying a hospital bed. Parker told the Times that “some [hospitals] fear about the financial implications” for their facility’s own operations.Still, the wireless remote monitoring devices are slimming so much that they are approaching near weightlessness.

“Suppose that all of a convalescent patient’s electrode patches were consolidated into a single, nearly invisible and weightless version — as thin as a temporary, press-on tattoo. And suppose that a tiny radio transmitter eliminated the need for any wires tethering the patient to monitoring machines,” the NY Times writes.

A prototype of such a device is currently under development at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Researchers there are developing an ultra thin sensor that weighs just three-thousandths of an ounce. This technology could be utilized inside the body and on the skin. The journal Science published research on the sensor last month.

John A. Rogers, an engineering professor and a 2009 MacArthur Fellow, is leading the team at the University of Illinois. Rogers also co-founded MC10, an electronics company based in a Cambridge, MA that has plans to release a commercial version of the sensor in 2013.

The rest of the New York Times article offers a compelling overview of the wireless health space, including whether a lack of financial incentives is one of the biggest challenges facing wireless health. Read more here.

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Telehealth, Remote Monitoring and Mobile Health : Health in 30

Telehealth, Remote Monitoring and Mobile Health : Health in 30 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Bill Crounse, MD, Senior Director, Worldwide Health, Worldwide Public Sector Microsoft Corporation shares his insights and describes four leading trends and technologies that will transform health and health care in 2012 and beyond.

These leading technologies include: cloud computing, health gaming, telehealth services and remote monitoring/mobile health.

Telehealth, Remote Monitoring, Mobile Health

I’d like to focus on telehealth and remote monitoring/mobile health since I feel telehealth is the nucleus of patient care, and telehealth can help reduce health care costs, and improve quality health care for patients. Telehealth technology combined mobile technology such as smartphones will make monitoring patients conditions easier and more efficient, and “cheaper and more scalable.”

Patient Quality Health Care

Through the Accountable Care Organizational Model (ACO), the core concept is to improve the quality of care for individuals with the notion to reduce health care spending.

According to the CDC, chronic diseases cause 7 in 10 deaths each year in the United States, about 133 million Americans—nearly 1 in 2 adults—live with at least one chronic illness, and more than 75% of health care costs are due to chronic conditions. In 2009, the five leading causes of death were heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, and accidents.

By moving points of care into the community, individuals can maintain their independence with continuous support supplied by remote patient monitoring. By transmitting personal biometics via advanced data services, patients have the opportunity to have their chronic condition managed continuously by health professionals.

With constant monitoring it is possible to identify high risk patients quickly and provide them with evidenced –based information they need to quickly resolve their condition. Instead of identifying health care risk at the critical point, telehealth can identify a situation before it progresses to the critical stage requiring potential hospitalization.

To help decrease health care costs, by identifying a potential risk early on, intervention can occur before a critical situation arises. Not only does this assist with decreasing costs, more importantly it allows individuals to be managed at home.

I recently had a casual conversation with a physician about this topic on remote patient monitoring and mobile devices, health care costs and hospital re-admissions, etc., and he said that he would love to be able to implement remote monitoring for his patients so he can readily monitor them, but he willingly admitted that he really does not know anything about it.

I agree with Bill Crounse, MD:

“Remote monitoring with advanced sensor technologies coupled with mobile devices and services as outlined above, will make it possible to care for more patients in less acute settings, including the home, and to do so at scale with fewer staff. I am particularly impressed by companies that are working with regulators (such as the FDA) to develop approved medical devices and secure gateways that facilitate clinical information exchanges.”

Stakeholders

As I wrote in my article published in HIMSS, this technology already exists, and it does not need to be developed. The problem is that this technology has been slow to adopt, but more than that, the forward thinking stakeholders involved in the deployment of this technology need the push and pull of not only industry insiders but the biggest stakeholders of all, the patient.

Individuals may have a huge role and may be able to help move the “product to market.”

The health care industry needs to not only understand the value of telehealth, but it needs to implement it.

Your turn

We would love for you to share your insightful thoughts and comments. Are you aware of the type of telehealth platforms which are available to help transform health care? What suggestions do you have to help take telehealth products to market?

As always, thank you for your time.

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mHealth provides surgeons with a new set of instruments - FierceMobileHealthcare

mHealth provides surgeons with a new set of instruments - FierceMobileHealthcare | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
While mobile technologies have found a place in a host of healthcare specialties, including cardiac care, radiology and neurology, the one department they hadn't penetrated until recently was the Read more...
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Digital Health Insights

Digital Health Insights | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
For a crash course in digital health, check out our favourite articles, talks and resources. To stay in the picture, here’s our must-follow Twitter list and our favourite digital health people on Google+

We’re also building a list of digital health startups in Europe. Let us know if you’d like to be on the list!


Via Bart Collet
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Virtual Patient Models Help Medical Researchers Conduct Studies In Silico

Virtual Patient Models Help Medical Researchers Conduct Studies In Silico | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The Wall Street Journal is profiling researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the FDA who are building virtual computer patients to study things...
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Electronic data system to improve health care (4 a.m.) - Las Cruces Sun-News

Electronic data system to improve health care (4 a.m.) - Las Cruces Sun-News | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) announces the start of electronic data exchange between health care providers and the New Mexico Statewide Immunization Information System (NMSIIS)."This exchange will provide more accurate immunization records for New Mexico's children to assure that they get the immunizations that they need and do not receive immunizations unnecessarily," said Dr.Catherine Torres, Cabinet Secretary of DOH.

The Taos Clinic for Children and Youth and Albuquerque Health Partners, in partnership with the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative, confirmed today that they have successfully submitted data from their Electronic Health Records (EHR) to the NMSIIS. The data was submitted electronically and contained thousands of immunization records. The electronic submission of the data saved hundreds of hours of data entry for the health care providers. In addition to saving time, electronic data exchange also: lowers errors, makes information available sooner and results in more complete immunization information.

"I applaud the new launch of the NMSIIS data exchange. As a former member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee from 1993-1997, this NMSIIS data exchange becomes the realization of having state and national data platforms for patient information," said Dr.Sylvia Fernandez Villarreal of the Taos Clinic for Children and Youth. "Currently, I am a member of the Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines. NMSIIS has made this

step realized in implementing, providing and documenting quality standards in childhood immunizations in a timely and safe manner. Congratulations and thank you from a pediatrician who knows the day to day challenges of when did Jose get his "shots' and keeping him safe from duplication, injury and illness."This successful exchange of immunization records is the result of a federal grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The grant funding has allowed the New Mexico Department of Health to make improvements to the NMSIIS and to help health care providers to implement electronic data exchange. As part of the grant, DOH plans to start exchanging data with four other provider groups. After the grant has been completed, more providers will begin exchanging data. This exchange marks a major milestone for DOH as it moves forward to enhance the NMSIIS to support health care providers as they work towards meaningful use of electronic health records.

"As the Electronic Health Record leader in the state's largest physician owned practice, I am delighted that Department of Health employees and leaders are now receiving our information about patient immunizations through secure electronic connections, and we can stop manually enter that information in the state website," Robert White, MD, MPH, Medical Informatics Director for ABQ Health Partners. "The day we started sending our immunization records automatically from our Electronic Health Record to the Department of Health through the New Mexico Health Information Collaborative electronic exchange, I received hugs from several pediatric clinic nurses. They are delighted to use their time and our EHR more efficiently and accurately. To add icing on the cake, we made the change the Friday before our busy Saturday flu shot clinic for kids. Our work to adopt electronic technology is benefiting our staff, doctors, patients and the state."

The NMSIIS is operated by DOH's Public Health Division. The NMSIIS is an important tool used by public and private providers in recording and tracking the immunization status of individuals and is used to improve rates of immunization. The registry is also used to track vaccine inventory, generate detailed reports on rates of immunization, and as a valuable tool assisting in epidemiological investigations of vaccine-preventable disease.

For more information regarding the NMSIIS and other vaccination issues, please visit the New Mexico Department of Health's Immunization website at http://www.immunizenm.org/.

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Gamasutra - News - Students Win $100K Scholarship With Kinect Leg Prosthesis Project

Gamasutra - News - Students Win $100K Scholarship With Kinect Leg Prosthesis Project | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A team of students has won a college scholarship as part of the 2011 Siemens Competition, for its work on a project that uses the Kinect motion-sensor hardware to help people with leg injuries and ailments.
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Geisinger Launches Mobile App to Access Electronic Health Record

ewswise — DANVILLE, Pa. – Geisinger Health System (GHS) is making electronic health services available to iPhone and Android users with a free mobile application, MyChart.MyChart allows users to see their MyGeisinger electronic medical information, including health summaries, test results, messaging to and from their physician, appointments, health maintenance reminders and proxy access to family members’ health records, through a secure mobile application.

“We are thrilled to offer this valuable tool to MyGeisinger users,” said Chanin Wendling, manager, eHealth, GHS. “Our goal is to offer secure access to our patients’ health records in the most convenient and efficient manner possible. Our hope is that this ease of access will help our patients keep health in the forefront of their minds.”

MyGeisinger, the GHS Internet patient portal, is an online tool that allows patients to electronically manage their health record. The program was launched in 2001.

To begin using MyChart, registered MyGeisinger users first need to search keyword “MyChart” in the iTunes App store or Android Market and add the application to their portable device. Visit www.MyGeisinger.org for instructions and frequently asked questions.

About Geisinger Health System
Geisinger is an integrated health services organization widely recognized for its innovative use of the electronic health record, and the development and implementation of innovative care models including ProvenHealth Navigator, an advanced medical home model, and ProvenCare program. The system serves more than 2.6 million residents throughout 44 counties in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. For more information, visit Geisinger. Follow the latest Geisinger news and more at Twitter and Facebook.

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ReachMD - Program - Smartphones and Improving Neurologic Care

ReachMD - Program - Smartphones and Improving Neurologic Care | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Is there an app for helping your patients improve their health? In fact, there are many. Dr. Neil Busis, chief of the division of neurology, department of medicine, at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside and Practice and Technology editor of AAN.com, talks with host Dr. Anthony Alessi about the latest mobile technologies used to monitor patient experiences with chronic neurological issues, such as migraines and epileptic seizures. They also discuss how even standard smartphone functions can be used to improve the health and medical care of patients, and why text messaging is changing healthcare around the world.

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Android Medical & HealthCare Application Development - Fitness & First Aid on Finger Tips

Useful android healthcare app development & android medical app development for medical emergence and first aid on fingertips; hire expert android developers.
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Box Sends Health Data Right to the Cloud - Technology Review

Box Sends Health Data Right to the Cloud - Technology Review | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Some 133 million Americans suffer from chronic disease, and many would benefit from better home-based monitoring of their condition, but today's home-health medical machines remain mostly unconnected to the doctors who might want to check the data between visits.

A new platform from Qualcomm aims to solve this with a simple box that detects signals from devices from dozens of makers, and dispatches them by cellular connection to a cloud database that can be accessed by medical staff as well as patients.

"Health-care reform will pay providers for keeping you well instead of treating you when you're sick," says John Halamka, a Harvard Medical School professor and chief information officer at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital. "In the future, it's likely that continuous home monitoring with frequent caregiver interventions will replace many hospital visits. The Qualcomm technologies support this kind of workflow."

Qualcomm has formed a division called Qualcomm Life to sell the new home-based hub, run the back-end databases, and establish partnerships with device makers. The platform meets all medical standards, is "technology agnostic, and can pair with virtually anything," says Rick Valencia, Qualcomm Life's vice president. Still, a payment system between medical device makers and insurance providers remains to be worked out.

Andy Castonguay, principal analyst for handsets and devices at Informa, says that while many players are working on wireless solutions, the Qualcomm system "is the first product on the market that allows a drop-and-play solution in the home. There are caveats—you need the service and payment elements to line up—but once that happens, it allows someone to pop it into their home and use this as a central point of communication.

Monitoring devices include blood-pressure monitors for hypertension patients; glucose monitoring for diabetics; simple electronic scales that can warn of fluid retention—a key indicator for heart failure; and breathing tests for people with pulmonary disease and asthma.

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