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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Microsoft Surface tablets: A natural fit for healthcare | ZDNet

Microsoft Surface tablets: A natural fit for healthcare | ZDNet | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Healthcare has always been an industry ripe for using tablets. Workers in healthcare are constantly flitting around the office, and having constant access to the medical practice's network is a big benefit. The highly portable Surface tablets on the way from Microsoft could revolutionize these offices, if developers jump on the Metro bandwagon.I have recently visited two medical practices that are entrenched in the tablet philosophy. The two offices are very different, but have each settled on the old Tablet PC to mobilize the workers providing healthcare.

These offices are using the old convertible notebook with Windows 7, tablets that can swivel the screen to expose a full laptop. The workers carry them all day, entering pertinent information at each stop which is instantly updated to the patient's record.

In one practice the nurses and physician assistants use old HP Tablet PCs, while the doctors carry Motion slate Tablet PCs. The nurses I interviewed always use the HPs in laptop mode as they find typing easier to enter information on the run.

The doctors use a pen with the Motion, primarily to access information in the patient record when they come in for the examination. The two doctors I spoke with hated having to use the pen to manipulate the interface.

These practices are a perfect fit for the Surface tablets. The keyboard covers can be used by those who are more comfortable with typing for data entry, and the touch tablet for those like the doctors who just need to tap and access information.

What needs to happen to get these healthcare providers rolled over to the better solution is for the developers behind the practice management software in use to convert it to the Metro interface for the Surface. It might take a fair bit of work to make the proper conversion, but the target market is huge and flush with funds.

I suspect in a year or two we might see a lot of Surface tablets when we visit the doctor. It's a case of the perfect tool for the job, with everyone winning. All day battery life and a computer that is easy to carry for extended periods. Throw Windows into the mix and it's almost perfect.

If I had a company with medical practice software, I would divert every resource to getting it perfected for Windows Pro/RT tablets.

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Doctors’ Use of Social Networking Sites Differs from Country to Country | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Doctors’ Use of Social Networking Sites Differs from Country to Country | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Doctors too use social networking sites for professional purposes, but not all of them to the same extent. Healthcare professionals in emerging countries are generally more ‘connected’ than in Europe.

In comparison with their European colleagues, physicians in Asia, India and Russia seem more inclined to use social networking sites to help them with their work. Cegedim Strategic Data, a leading provider of healthcare market research, has just released the results of its online study which shows that Japanese doctors are the biggest fans of online medical communities, with 78% of the medical profession in Japan making use of them. Next in line come doctors in China (55%), India (54%) and Russia (52%). In contrast, less than half of all doctors in European countries take part in online medical communities. In Spain the figure is 48%, in the United Kingdom 40%, and 39% in Germany. The countries which are the least advanced in the adoption of such dedicated communities are Italy (15%) and – lagging far behind – France with 9%.

Choose your network

Along the same lines, the adoption of the mainstream social networks Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for professional purposes is far more prevalent among physicians in emerging countries than in Europe. Out in front here are Indian doctors, some 58% of members of the profession in the subcontinent surveyed reporting that they use these tools. Usage figures then drop sharply however, with just 31% using mainstream social media in Brazil, 29% in China and 25% in Russia. Despite these lower figures, the emerging countries are still ahead of European countries such as the United Kingdom, Spain, and Germany, where 21%, 18% and 11% respectively of doctors report using these online tools. Once again, Italy and France come in last – with 10% and 7% respectively.

A less clear-cut situation

However, the findings of the study are less clear-cut when we observe how doctors use the Internet for professional networking. Although the top two places are occupied by emerging countries - India with 65% and Brazil with 56% - some European countries are not that far behind. This is the case in the United Kingdom, where 51% use the Internet for medical networking; they are followed by German doctors, with a 47% rate. These two countries are even ahead of China (44%) and Russia (35%). Nevertheless one trend remains unaltered - the reluctance of Italian and French medical professionals, who once again appear least likely to use online networks, only 21% of the doctors surveyed in Italy and 16% in France doing so.

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mHealth Industry is ripe for investment

mHealth Industry is ripe for investment | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The mobile health (mHealth) market is a burgeoning market, growing every year.

A typical industry diagram would demonstrate that it has moved from the introductory stage–where the first iPhone and medical apps were released, and is now in the decidedly growing stage of the product life cycle.

As the industry matures, more and more people are taking notice of this billion dollar industry.

Indeed, it would be absurd a couple years ago to see a doctor pulling out an iPhone to check a patient’s blood sugar, or cardiogram results. Now, such practices are commonplace.

In fact, we have reviewed apps such as Track 3 which is an patient-centric diabetes planner and carb counter that logs and charts the following: glucose levels, exercise, medications, and weights. There is also a study reported by the iMedicalApps team over Glucose Buddy, which concluded that there was a significant decrease in HbA1c in comparison to a control group receiving only usual care.

This represents one small aspect of the total global mHealth market and its possibilities for helping to improve patient care.

According to one article, investment in the kinds of companies that make health information apps rose 78% in 2011 to $766 million. Qualcomm has started a $100 million fund, Insight Venture Partners is putting $40 million into a startup and Oprah Winfrey is interested as well, with her company investing in a website that helps doctors and patients interact.

David Jahns, managing partner of Galen Partners LP, a Stamford, Connecticut-based private equity firm explains.

“Demand for apps that let doctors and nurses see test results quickly and monitor vital signs remotely, combined with a push from government and insurers to collect better data to contain rising medical costs, is propelling investor interest in an array of health information technology.”

Since demand is fueling the growth of this market, there is also a corresponding increase in money invested. The article mentions that investment in health information technology has doubled since 2006, and rose 78 percent in 2011 from 2010, according to the National Venture Capital Association. Funding totaled $184 million in 27 deals in the first quarter of this year, according to Mercom Capital Group, an Austin, Texas-based consultant to health-care companies.

Industry venture investments of $2 million or more per deal are up about 30 percent this year, with most startups getting an average of $11.8 million, said Halle Tecco, chief executive officer of Rock Health, a seed accelerator for health technology startups.

Not only that, but Oprah Winfrey is also investing in mHealth ventures. Galen Partners led a $14 million investment in WebMD founder Jeff Arnold’s newest project, Atlanta-based Sharecare. The company began in 2010 in partnership with Dr. Mehmet Oz of Oprah Winfrey fame — Winfrey’s Harpo Studios is also a backer.

Sharecare has built searchable drug, supplement and wellness databases and has online tools for providers to connect with potential patients. On the consumer side, the company’s website provides thousands of answers to health questions by experts from hospitals, care provider associations and companies like Pfizer and Walgreens.

The government has taken notice as well to the industry. Regulations are being developed and standards to constitute what a medical app actually is. Not only that, but the U.S. economic stimulus package in 2009 set incentives for health-care providers to adopt electronic records, and President Obama’s 2010 health-care system overhaul is fostering a climate of change as it pushed providers further to cut costs and improve services.

mHealth apps appear to be a step toward this drive to improve patient care. Stay tuned for more information on the exciting and growing mHealth market.

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Doctors’ Use of Social Networking Sites Differs from Country to Country | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Doctors’ Use of Social Networking Sites Differs from Country to Country | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Doctors too use social networking sites for professional purposes, but not all of them to the same extent. Healthcare professionals in emerging countries are generally more ‘connected’ than in Europe.

In comparison with their European colleagues, physicians in Asia, India and Russia seem more inclined to use social networking sites to help them with their work. Cegedim Strategic Data, a leading provider of healthcare market research, has just released the results of its online study which shows that Japanese doctors are the biggest fans of online medical communities, with 78% of the medical profession in Japan making use of them. Next in line come doctors in China (55%), India (54%) and Russia (52%). In contrast, less than half of all doctors in European countries take part in online medical communities. In Spain the figure is 48%, in the United Kingdom 40%, and 39% in Germany. The countries which are the least advanced in the adoption of such dedicated communities are Italy (15%) and – lagging far behind – France with 9%.

Choose your network

Along the same lines, the adoption of the mainstream social networks Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for professional purposes is far more prevalent among physicians in emerging countries than in Europe. Out in front here are Indian doctors, some 58% of members of the profession in the subcontinent surveyed reporting that they use these tools. Usage figures then drop sharply however, with just 31% using mainstream social media in Brazil, 29% in China and 25% in Russia. Despite these lower figures, the emerging countries are still ahead of European countries such as the United Kingdom, Spain, and Germany, where 21%, 18% and 11% respectively of doctors report using these online tools. Once again, Italy and France come in last – with 10% and 7% respectively.

A less clear-cut situation

However, the findings of the study are less clear-cut when we observe how doctors use the Internet for professional networking. Although the top two places are occupied by emerging countries - India with 65% and Brazil with 56% - some European countries are not that far behind. This is the case in the United Kingdom, where 51% use the Internet for medical networking; they are followed by German doctors, with a 47% rate. These two countries are even ahead of China (44%) and Russia (35%). Nevertheless one trend remains unaltered - the reluctance of Italian and French medical professionals, who once again appear least likely to use online networks, only 21% of the doctors surveyed in Italy and 16% in France doing so.

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30 Healthcare Tech Startups and Apps You Should Follow On Twitter

30 Healthcare Tech Startups and Apps You Should Follow On Twitter | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

It’s no secret that Boston acts as the epicenter to the nation’s medical and healthcare innovation sector. With its field-leading hospitals, keen technological sense, and penchant for startups and apps, Boston prides itself on being ahead of the health game. Here at BostInno, we try to keep you avid readers ahead of the game tooso we’ve compiled a list of some notable healthcare startups worth following on Twitter. From exercise trackers to medical coupons, this list attempts to give you insight into the vast med tech sphere. Keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive and we appreciate any suggestions and additions.Agile Diagnosis- @agilediagnosis- The clinical reasoning guidance you won’t find in textbooks.

Cardiio- @cardiio- Empowering people with simple yet powerful tools to experiment, gain insight and take charge of their health and wellbeing.

ChickRx- @ChickRx- The fun, personalized health & wellness site for chicks. Important news, expert Q&A, and our fave products.

Docphon- @Docphin- Personalize. Connect. Practice.

Gather.md- @gathermd- Analytics for your personal health, made actionable between you and your doctor.

HealthRally- @HealthRally- Get and stay motivated to reach your goal!

nephosity- @nephosity- Nephosity builds an iPad viewer app and cloud server for that enables collaborative access to medical images, anywhere, anytime.

Sano Intelligence- @sano_int- Building a revolutionary health monitoring product that will reveal new insights about stage-zero care.

Sessions- @joinsessions- Helping people to exercise more @ Rock Health 2012.

CareHubs- @carehubs- A Social Platform offering innovative tools to help patients and healthcare providers connect, coordinate & engage.

CareWire- @CareWire- CareWire is ubiquitous, immediate, encounter specific, and actionable.

Corengi- @corengi- Ryan Luce is the primary founder of www.corengi.com – a website that helps type 2 diabetes patients find clinical trials that are right for them.

My Coupon Doc- @CouponDoc- Your source for all healthcare and medication discounts.

DermLink.md- @Derm_Link- Web application that enables remote diagnosis of dermatology cases, dramatically reducing wait times for patients while driving increased revenues for providers.

SwiftPayMD- @SwiftPayMD- Mobile physician charge capture; Physicians using SwiftPayMD(TM) increase revenue capture more than 10%.

Cara Health- @cara_health- Using AI, Call Guidance and Monitoring to support Non-Clinicians reduce avoidable admissions in healthcare.

PUSH Wellness- @PUSH_Wellness- PUSH Wellness pays outcomes-based incentives to drive health behavior change, producing tangible benefits for participants and employers.

SwipeSense- @SwipeSense- Hand-hygiene 2.0

United Preference- @UtdPreference- United Preference is revolutionizing healthcare and wellness through Tailored Spend™, offering a new currency for delivering health and wellness incentives.

RunKeeper- @RunKeeper- Track, measure, and improve your fitness.

Laveem- @MyLaveem- At Laveem, we are passionate about understanding the foods we consume. Our mission is to provide the best tools and services for nutritional information.

GymPact- @Gympact- GymPact incentivizes your exercise! Check in at the gym with our iPhone app and earn cash rewards, paid by those who didn’t get to the gym.

Jog Log- @JogLog- Your friendly neighborhood iPhone running app with GPS mapping, voice cues, interval timers, heart-rate monitoring, Couch to 5k plan, dailymile sync and more!

iSmoothRun- @iSmoothRun- Best mobile App for Running! Programmed by a triathlete…

WeightConnect- @WeightConnect- On WeightConnect.com you will be able to send your Weighbot backup data to Runkeepers Health Graph.

Fitocracy- @fitocracy- Time to level up your fitness.

Arookoo- @arookoo- Arookoo is a one-of-a-kind iPhone app and website that turns walking into a game by sending you on fun challenges that motivate you to move around your city.

Withings Blood Pressure Monitor- @Withings- Withings designs, develops, and industrializes connected objects, as well as the associated network platforms and software applications.

Superproof- @superproof- A Social Fitness Game for iPhone & Internet.

ShapeUp – @shapeupdotcom - ShapeUp is a global corporate wellness company that uses social networking to make employees healthier. We make health social.

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Telehealth Can Reduce Deaths and Emergency Hospital Care

Telehealth Can Reduce Deaths and Emergency Hospital Care | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Telehealth Can Reduce Deaths and Emergency Hospital Care Tuesday, 03 July 2012

For people with long term conditions, telehealth can reduce deaths and help patients avoid the need for emergency hospital care, finds a study published on bmj.com. However, the estimated scale of hospital cost savings is modest and may not be sufficient to offset the cost of the technology, say the authors.

Telehealth uses technology to help people with health problems live more independently at home. For example, equipment to measure blood pressure or blood glucose levels at home can reduce hospital visits. Measurements are electronically transmitted to a health professional.

Several studies have been conducted on the impact of telehealth for people with long term conditions, but findings have been mixed. Some research suggests that telehealth can help patients develop a better understanding of their condition, leading to better quality and more appropriate care, as well as more efficient use of health care resources, but other studies have found negative effects.

However, assessing the scale of such an effect is complex.

So, an international team, led by researchers at the Nuffield Trust, set out to assess the impact of telehealth on hospital use for 3,230 patients with long term conditions (diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or heart failure) over one year.

The study is one of the largest telehealth studies ever conducted.

Patients were randomly split into two groups. A total of 1,570 intervention patients were given devices and taught how to monitor their condition at home and transmit the data to health care professionals. A further 1,584 control patients received usual care.

During the study period, significantly fewer (43%) of intervention patients were admitted to hospital compared with 48% of control patients. Significantly fewer (4.6%) of intervention patients died compared with 8.3% of controls. This equates to about 60 lives over a 12 month period.

There were also statistically significant differences in the mean number of emergency hospital admissions per head (0.54 for intervention patients compared with 0.68 for controls) and the mean hospital stay per head (4.87 days for intervention patients compared with 5.68 days for controls), although the authors say these findings should be interpreted with caution.

These differences remained significant after adjusting for several factors that could have influenced the results. However, the authors point out that these effects appear to be linked with short term increases in hospital use among control patients, the reasons for which are not clear.

They also say that the estimated cost savings are modest.

These results suggest that telehealth reduced mortality and helped patients avoid the need for emergency hospital care, conclude the authors. This may be because telehealth helps patients better manage their conditions and avoid a worsening of symptoms that may need emergency care. Other possibilities are that telehealth changes people's perception of when they need to seek additional support.

But they stress that these benefits need to be balanced against the cost of the technology itself and the level of savings that can be achieved.

In an accompanying editorial, Josip Car, Director of the Global eHealth Unit at Imperial College London and colleagues say this latest evidence doesn't warrant full scale roll-out but more careful exploration.

Although factors that might be important for successful telehealth can be described, "we need more clarity on how to interpret the relative contributions of these elements," they write.

They suggest that policy makers, commissioners, and guideline developers should help ensure that the research agenda focuses on areas where telehealth shows most promise. "There is great potential but also still much to be done," they conclude.

Effect of telehealth on use of secondary care and mortality: findings from the Whole System Demonstrator cluster randomised trial.
Steventon A, Bardsley M, Billings J, Dixon J, Doll H, Hirani S, Cartwright M, Rixon L, Knapp M, Henderson C, Rogers A, Fitzpatrick R, Hendy J, Newman S; for the Whole System Demonstrator Evaluation Team.
BMJ. 2012 Jun 21;344:e3874. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e3874.

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Emails for Improved Doctor Patient Communication

Emails for Improved Doctor Patient Communication contains information for clinics, hospitals and doctors to help them use Emails effectively with patients to improve Patient Engagement, Patient Satisfaction and Quality of Care


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Health IT Is a Small, But Significant Part of Health Reform

Health IT Is a Small, But Significant Part of Health Reform | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Most efforts to give hospitals and doctors the latest IT tools are rooted in 2009 stimulus laws that predate Obama's Affordable Care Act.

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Checking Your Blood Pressure Just Got Really Sexy

Checking Your Blood Pressure Just Got Really Sexy | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Bloodnoteis a simple app where you can track your blood pressure and control your health. Created by Peter Bajtala and Matt Ludzen, Bloodnote’s wonderfully minimal design turns a mundane task into something much easier on the eyes.Today, blood pressure is still typically tracked on paper. As you’d expect, keeping all that data on your iPhone means less clutter and more potential for visualizing drastic and/or gradual changes overtime.

The way health and wellness industries mingle with the influence of startups and tech continues to evolve. Just recently, we saw Facebook’s life saving organ donor feature, Noom’s Android lifestyle app, and Runmeter’s integration with iCloud.

 

More details, from the creators:Bloodnote is an app for daily logging and controlling your blood pressure. You will always have your actual blood pressure data at hand.

Forget all the papers with your blood pressure written down which you would lose anyway.

Write indications straight to your phone and have them with you when you need them. Show them to your doctor just when needed.

Easy to use interface will help you log your blood pressure data without hassle and simple calendar will remind you about being systematic.

Remember: hypertension is medical condition not only of elders. Take care of your health

 

Bloodnoteisn’t a one stop shop for tracking your health. Instead, it’s a highly niche app that does one thing and does it well. For anyone that has to monitor their blood pressure and pulse regularly, this app is certainly worth a look.➤ Bloodnote, $1.99 via the App Store


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Doctor-Patient Communication in Today's Digital Age | The Diane Rehm Show

Doctor-Patient Communication in Today's Digital Age | The Diane Rehm Show | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Hey doc, you can't read my mind & I can't read your handwriting. So, let's practice communicating right here.

 

"Many Americans send email and text messages more often than they speak on the phone. Whether electronics offer the best way for doctors to communicate with their patients is in debate. Some doctors are concerned about privacy and liability issues and a loss of face-time with their patients. But doctors who favor emailing say it's a more efficient means of communication, helps build better relationships and encourages patients to take more control of their health. One recent study concluded that patients with diabetes or hypertension who communicate with their doctors via email have better outcomes. Diane and her guest discuss doctor-patient interactions in the digital age."

 

CE: This is an NPR radio show. Great guests. Long discussion.


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Disruptor of the Day: Joshua Smith – A Researcher on The Cutting Edge of Sensor Technology [Q&A]

Disruptor of the Day: Joshua Smith – A Researcher on The Cutting Edge of Sensor Technology [Q&A] | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Sensors are everywhere around us from smartphone touchscreens to elevator buttons to thermostats. These sensor devices, which receive and respond to a signal, are a linchpin of the so-called “Internet of Things.” As they become smaller, cheaper and require less power they are being deployed in more places that we encounter every day — whether we are aware of it or not.

 

Nice interview w/ MIT researcher Joshua Smith.


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Digital Health App Market

Digital Health App Market | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The “Mobile Health News” study delivers a complete overview and detailed trends of the Digital Health App Market.

Find also the Infographic of MISFIT, an US start-up which is developing highly wearable sensor products and services for wellness and medical applications. (its CEO is the originator of IBGStar, the iPhone Sensor for diabetics to track their glycemy rate).

via Paul Sonnier of Digital Health LinkedIn Group.


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Making Patient Access to Their Health Information a Reality

Making Patient Access to Their Health Information a Reality | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Patient access to electronic health records (EHRs) is a legal right through HIPAA, but find out how patient access to EHRs has improved through EHR adoption.

 

Patient Access to Health Information Means Better Care

 

Things are changing. ONC is working to get health care providers online and using electronic health records (EHRs). And adoption rates of EHRs are soaring: Hospital adoption of EHR systems has more than doubled since 2009. As our health information becomes digital, getting access to it ourselves—as patients or caregivers—makes a lot more sense. For one thing, we can make sure all of the people who care for us have the information they need to get a complete picture of our health. (Or, for you health IT geeks out there, the patient can act as an “HIE of One”.)

 

In addition, we can use the health information ourselves to better communicate with providers and peers, better understand our health and treatment options, and make sure health information about us is as accurate and complete as possible. Research shows that engaged patients actually get better-quality health care, and can avoid potential medical errors.

 

Health Information and eHealth Tools

 

Last but not least, we can plug data from our electronic health records into a growing number of e-health tools and applications that help us better manage our own personal health and wellness, often outside of the context of traditional health care. Devices such as digital scales and wireless pedometers help us to track key health metrics; smartphone apps provide information, tools, and reminders; and online communities help us to interpret information, receive emotional support, and make choices that support our personal health goals. Eighty percent of Americans who have access to the information in their electronic health records use it, and a full two-thirds of those who don’t yet have electronic access say they want it .

 

On June 4, ONC joined forces with our federal partners at the White House and the U.S.

 

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to host The Patient Access Summit. The purpose of the meeting was to identify and prioritize areas where technical standards and best practices are needed to turbo-charge progress in making patient access to health data a reality. There was a rich diversity of perspectives represented at the meeting—including those of several patients who shared their personal stories of the struggle to get timely information that in some cases meant the difference between life and death.


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3 smartphone apps help people lose weight | Main

3 smartphone apps help people lose weight  | Main | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
One app even includes a Glycemic Index calculator.
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Consumer use of social media in healthcare

Rich Meyer recently undertook a design initiative to gain an insight into how consumers are using social media for healthcare information and decisions. Here he shares his findings.


Over the last two months I had the chance to design and implement a qualitative research initiative designed to better understand how consumers are using social media for healthcare information and decisions. The research consisted of consumers who have searched for online health information within the last 3–4 months and varied in demographics.

 

Here are some of the key findings.


The search for health information is triggered by either health concerns of a patient or health concerns of a family member. Even people who believe they are in really good health do not proactively search for health information. It is usually driven by some type of trigger with the most saying they go online because of a concern (i.e. pain, problem) or because they are caregivers for a family member that is having problems.


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New smartphone app targets clinical miscommunication | Healthcare IT News

New smartphone app targets clinical miscommunication | Healthcare IT News | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

New smartphone app targets clinical miscommunication

July 06, 2012 | Mike Miliard, Managing Editor

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Related Resources

Maple Grove Hospital: Building Innovative Healthcare Communications From the Ground UpThe 4Cs of Global Healthcare ReformA Catalyst for Change: How Telemedicine is Transforming the Delivery of Healthcare and EducationSimplifying Medicare Cost Reporting through the use of Report AnalyticsWhere Information and Care Meet: Secure Mobile Healthcare Solutions that Drive Care Coordination

MENDHAM, NJ – With more and more doctors using their smartphones to conduct business outside of the office, the potential for communication errors – ranging from misunderstood directions to "he-said-she-said" moments – is increasing dramatically.

A New Jersey-based surgeon has created a mobile app designed to help doctors make sure their phone conversations are understood properly. The MedXCom app, part of a line of mHealth products developed by Giffen Solutions, records and stores the phone conversation between doctor and patient, giving both parties a HIPAA-compliant means of checking the facts.

"All we're doing is creating an environment where these messages are secure," said Michael Nusbaum, a bariatric surgeon at Morristown Medical Center who launched Giffen Solutions in 2010. "If (both doctor and patient) know their conversation is being recorded, this makes them more comfortable. This actually bumps up the level of conversation and improves the level of care."

[See also: Smartphones gain appeal with more docs.]

Nusbaum said the idea of securely recording doctor-patient conversations came out of an unfortunate legal situation faced by a colleague. A woman had filed suit against his colleague over medical instructions given over the phone for her husband, and Nusbaum was drawn into the court battle over exactly what was said in the phone conversation.

"We need to avoid those 'he-said-she-said' moments and make sure there are no mistakes," said Nusbaum. "The future is in smartphones, and they're becoming a comfort tool for doctors."

Nusbaum began his career in mobile health IT back in 1998, when he founded Hamilton Scientific on the concept of creating a cloud-based electronic medical record. He eventually sold the company to MeridianEMR, and continued to explore how EMRs could evolve from what he called static data repositories to systems that could be more dynamic. Giffen Solutions was borne out of that idea, and MedXCom was created to connect EMRs to mobile devices and allow for real-time access and adjustments.

MedXCom, which is designed to work with any EMR, enables the physician to access a patient's medical records on a smartphone before or during the conversation, and to add the conversation to the medical record. The patient-facing side of the product enables patients to add information to the app, make appointments and receive reminders. Another product, MedXVault, allows consumers to use the app regardless of whether their physician is a MedXCom subscriber.

[See also: Smartphones, medical apps used by 80 percent of docs.]

Nusbaum, who sees MedXCom as an alternative to answering services and after-hours messaging services that many physicians now use, said he's hoping to have more than 50,000 physicians in all 50 states using MedXCom by the end of the year.

Among the physicians using the app now is Richard Garden, DDS, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon with Chesapeake Oral Surgery Associates in Wayne, N.J.

"As a surgeon, I receive numerous phone calls via my smartphone on the weekend and after hours," Garden said in a press release issued on June 6. "MedXCom allows me to record all calls in order to improve the quality of care I deliver to my patients. My primary goal is to make sure that my patients are comfortable and well cared for in all instances, and the technology allows me to deliver superior service and communication."

"MedXCom's platform allows me to connect instantly with my patients and their health profiles," Garden added. "The ability to have all secure pertinent information at my fingertips while all communications are recorded and archived is critical."

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Self Measurement Is “Just Part of the Story - It Has to Be Put in Context." | L'Atelier

Self Measurement Is “Just Part of the Story - It Has to Be Put in Context." | L'Atelier | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
If self-measurement is really going to enable us to learn about ourselves, it will have to become an ecosystem where recording measurements is just one link in the chain.

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Doctors 2.0™ & You » Doctors 2.0 & You 2012 – Videos (plenary)

Doctors 2.0™ & You » Doctors 2.0 & You 2012 – Videos (plenary) | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

[video]

Keynote – SoLoGloMoGaBi – Denise Silber

Keynote – Mobile Apps for Patients – Dr Jennifer Dyer

Keynote – How has Mobile transformed MedEd? – Lawrence Sherman

Keynote – Daring the Crowd-sourced Keynote – Dr Berci Mesko

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Nike+ Fuelband vs. FitBit Ultra vs. Striiv

Nike+ Fuelband vs. FitBit Ultra vs. Striiv | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Yesterday morning, I tooled up myself with 3 of my lovely desirable sensors.

In the afternoon, I was troubled as the 3 sensors displayed different measures for steps as for calories burned (where the delta is very important). Which sensor do you think we could believe the most ?


Via Olivier Janin
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Olivier Janin's comment, July 4, 2012 9:39 AM
TY dbtmobile, I am to publish other tests results. I think that I shouldn't wear the sensors while I 'm sitting at my desk. My colleague made a test this morning btwn FitBit and Striiv and only while walking. Steps counts are very closed. But calories burned are still very different (1328 for Fitbit, 257 for Striiv!)
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Storify: HealthStartup on Big data in healthcare

Storification of HealthStartup III on Big Data, held June, 26 in Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The theme of this edition is Big Data; therefore we’re focusing on startups that place data at the heart of their business model and business proposition.


Via Bart Collet
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Everything you ever wanted to know about Canadian health care in one post

Everything you ever wanted to know about Canadian health care in one post | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Everything you ever wanted to know about Canadian health care in one post (RT @LogicalAnalysis: Everything you ever wanted to know about Canadian health care in one post http://t.co/qgES0pwS via @postgraphics...)...


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Mobile and Connected Devices to Drive Preventive Health - eHEALTH

Mobile and Connected Devices to Drive Preventive Health - eHEALTH | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
In the next few years, innovations in mobile and connected device technology will fundamentally transform the health care landscape, providing new solutions to address chronic diseases conditions and revolutionize the way ...
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Are physicians ready to “prescribe” mobile apps?

Are physicians ready to “prescribe” mobile apps? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

These days, the treatment of chronic diseases often includes a variety of medications, lifestyle changes, and patient education. The combination of these elements encompasses the world of chronic disease management. Soon, we’ll be adding mobile apps, telemonitoring, and virtual follow-ups with health care providers. These will become routine elements of any standard disease management process. Telemonitoring has been used for many years to help patients with certain conditions such as heart failure, irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias), diabetes, and some lung conditions. Telemonitoring equipment can be quite expensive and standard health insurance plans are not always covering the cost of the equipment or the services that are provided by licensed health care providers to work with patients who are using telemonitoring solutions.

Enter mobile apps that run on Internet-connected mobile devices like iPhones, iPads, Androids, and many other devices. Since these devices are already connected, they can easily transmit vital data to health care providers who can review the patient information and respond with a digital message directly to the patient. Before long, the “prescription” of a mobile app will be a routine part of providing care to a patient who is managing a chronic condition. We’ll see physicians filling out prescriptions for mobile apps (maybe this is where the paper prescription pad will come back). I don’t think standard e-prescribing systems will support the prescription of mobile apps, but then again, maybe you can just use an open field and print it out for the patient. I imagine that it won’t be long before physicians are “bumping” their smartphones or using NFC to transmit the mobile app prescription to the patient.

These are exciting times where we are seeing the value of mobile apps that can truly enhance patient care, improve disease management, and facilitate communication between the patient and the health care provider. I know that some physicians still remain very reluctant to prescribe a mobile app to a patient because they fear potential litigation if a patient misuses an app, is misguided an app, or gets injured in some other way from a mobile app. Once we see a critical mass of physicians prescribing mobile apps, those apprehensions will probably dissolve. Until then, we’ll need to rely on the early adopters - the trendsetters - who are progressive about improving health care delivery through the novel use of ubiquitous technology. Before long, the act of prescribing a mobile app will no longer be novel. Can you imagine that?


Via Parag Vora, dbtmobile
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Phone-based therapy for depressed patients may be a good call - FiercePracticeManagement

Phone-based therapy for depressed patients may be a good call - FiercePracticeManagement | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that many of the barriers to face-to-face therapy, such as travel and taking time away from work and family, can be overcome by conducting cognitive therapy over the...
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Most Patients Want to Self-Manage Healthcare Online

Most Patients Want to Self-Manage Healthcare Online | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Accenture released a survey and infograpic last week stating that 90 percent of patients want to self-manage their healthcare leveraging technology, such as accessing medical information, refilling prescriptions and booking appointments online, but nearly half (46 percent) are unaware if their health records are available electronically.

 

The survey is based on an online survey of 1,110 U.S. patients to determine the preferred channels of electronic health information and services. The online survey was fielded March 30 through April 4, 2012. One of the leading results of this survey is the desire to manage consumer health through mobile devices, which should come as no surprise with the increasing growth in the mHealth space. The infographic shown below summarizes the key highlights of the survey:


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