Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Coming Next: Doctors Prescribing Apps to Patients

Coming Next: Doctors Prescribing Apps to Patients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Apps that can assess data like blood glucose levels, diet and drug regimen — and can be reimbursed by insurance — will soon be prescribed by doctors to help treat patients.

 

...The idea of medically prescribed apps excites some people in the health care industry, who see them as a starting point for even more sophisticated applications that might otherwise never be built. But first, a range of issues — around vetting, paying for and monitoring the proper use of such apps — needs to be worked out.

“It is intuitive to people, the idea of a prescription,” said Lee H. Perlman, managing director of Happtique, a subsidiary of the business arm of the Greater New York Hospital Association. Happtique is creating a system to allow doctors to prescribe apps, and Mr. Perlman suggested that a change in the way people think about medicine might be required: “We’re basically saying that pills can also be information, that pills can also be connectivity.”

Simple apps that track users’ personal fitness goals have already gained wide traction. Now medical professionals and entrepreneurs want to use similar approaches to dealing with chronic ailments like diabetes or heart disease.

If smartphone-based systems can reduce the amount of other medical care that patients need, the potential benefit to the health care system would be enormous; the total cost of treating diabetes alone in 2007 was $174 billion, according to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But unlike a 99-cent game, apps dealing directly with medical care cannot be introduced to the public with bugs that will be fixed later. The industry is still grappling with how to ensure quality and safety.

....


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Publicité mobile: des performances très prometteuses | Blog ...

Publicité mobile: des performances très prometteuses | Blog ... | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Qui a dit que le mobile, cela ne servait à rien? Médiamétrie comptabilisait en 2011 environ 18 millions de mobinautes en France. Les dépenses.
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Mobile: The biggest trend in health care communications | Articles | Mobile

Mobile: The biggest trend in health care communications | Articles | Mobile | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Your smartphone is going to help patients make better health care decisions. #mhealth #health20 #etp
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Role and Effects of Social Media on Global Medical Device and Technology Firms - Technology News - redOrbit

Role and Effects of Social Media on Global Medical Device and Technology Firms - Technology News - redOrbit | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

New York, US (PRWEB) August 14, 2012

 

The growing international influence of social media cannot and should not be underestimated by medical device, diagnostic and technology firms (referred as medtech). Medtech firms need to employ digital marketing strategies and tactics through social networking and online marketing as consumers increasingly control their own health and medication decisions.

It is important to establish that the medical healthcare equipment and supplies market continues to grow. According to Datamonitor, the global medical device and diagnostics market will be worth $370.7 billion by 2015, which is 13.4 percent up on its value in 2010. However, the industry is extremely competitive and the rivalry is strong amongst the biggest firms that take the majority of the market share in many nations.

 

Consumer Health Trend

There is a wealth of evidence that suggests consumers are becoming increasingly influential over their own healthcare – making their own choices with regards to treatment and medication. According to Euromonitor, the mistrust in general practitioners, tighter household spending budgets and wider access to information via the internet, result in the consumers’ increasing involvement in their own healthcare decisions.

The report stated, “The internet has played a major role in empowering consumers, by providing opportunities for self-diagnosis, links to healthcare professionals, user forums, information on healthcare products and services, price comparison services and purchasing drug and equipment online.”

 

In addition, according to Euromonitor there’s an upward trend of consumers being more open and willing to buy their medication and healthcare equipment from overseas. Consumers all over the world prefer and look for online information in their own language. They also expect materials such as patient information and promotional brochures to be localized and translated. This infers that medical translation services are vital and can make a significant impact in the global marketplace. Medtech firms that ignore this demand can miss out on potential lucrative new markets.

 

Culture, social media and localization

Medtech firms of any size have a chance to compete with smart use of social media and digital marketing tools that target customers in emerging economies, such as Latin America, India, Russia and China.

Major emerging markets such as China and Latin America are particularly influenced by word-of-mouth (WOM) in decision-making and consumption of products. Micro-blogging is a suitable social media platform and online marketing tool to increase awareness and demand about medical device products online. Captured audience in these markets share “deals,” feedback and recommendations within their network of family, friends, peers and followers.

Moreover, Experian Simmons stated that Chinese consumers have avidly adopted Web 2.0 technology and are exceptionally influenced by word-of-mouth when making consumer choices. Meanwhile, Hispanic consumers are more likely to interact with brands through social networking than non-Hispanics.

A global reach with social media is achievable, but not if a company only relies on Facebook and Twitter. It goes beyond language – you have to know their culture and the technology they use. A number of other high profile social networks such as Weibo in China, Tuenti in Spain, Nasza Klasa in Poland, Fotolog in Argentina, and Wer Kennt Wen in Germany, are the preferred social media platforms in their respective countries than Facebook and Twitter.

 

The influence of social networking is a global phenomenon and any business should include social media activities in their organization’s marketing mix. For medical device and diagnostic businesses to achieve global reach, it is necessary to work with a qualified translation services provider with expertise in the medtech industry to guide them through the localization and translation process. Medtech firms still need to ensure that their message even if it’s in the social media context should follow and be mindful of any regulatory guidelines.

Planning the right blend of networks and messages also needs the proper localization and translation by a qualified language service provider (LSP). Working with an industry quality accredited LSP for medical translation services, will help ensure that your organization’s digital marketing campaign messages are translated and localized quickly and accurately.

 

For more information, please contact Merrill Brink at translations(at)merrillbrink(dot)com or in the U.S., call 800-688-4400 or in Europe, call 353-(0)91-393000; Web: http://www.merrillbrink.com

For full text: http://www.merrillbrink.com/role-and-effects-of-social-media-on-global-medtech-firms-08132012.htm

redOrbit (http://s.tt/1kXhW)


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What if Amazon became a publisher of health-focused social games? | Patient

What if Amazon became a publisher of health-focused social games? | Patient | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Last Tuesday Amazon launched Amazon Game Studios, a team within Amazon designed to create new social games. The first effort: a free-to-play game for Facebook. #ehealth #gaming
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MotherKnows Creates iPhone-Accessible Health Records For Your Children

MotherKnows Creates iPhone-Accessible Health Records For Your Children | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
MotherKnows is a startup hoping to revolutionize the way parents keep track of the health of their children.

Name: MotherKnows

Quick Pitch: Digitize your child’s health records and access them whenever medical forms are needed.

Genius Idea: MotherKnows does all the work, compiling accurate graphs of immunizations, growth charts, medication, allergies and future appointments. Simply sign a consent form and the startup will gather original health documents from your child’s doctors.

In addition to a primary physician, children start seeing specialists for various procedures and urgent care providers for emergency care at a young age. Typically that entails a lot of paperwork.

By adulthood, average American patients sees about 18.7 different doctors. Think about how many times you’ve lost track of vaccination records and immunization papers.

The creators of MotherKnows believe it’s time to rethink the way we keep track of medical records. One of the best ways to ensure the health of children is to keep informed with updated records, MotherKnows CEO and founder Hesky Kutscher tells Mashable.

The startup has a long-term solution to the universal dilemma of keeping updated medical records — digitizing all health-related information onto one web platform.

“People want a secure place for health information that they can access whenever they need it — in case of emergencies and whatever else,” Kutscher says. “You can’t sign up kids for school or camp without having immunization records and their medications they are taking and conditions.”

SEE ALSO: 5 Ways to Instantly Connect With Doctors

Plans include monthly, yearly and premium packages. On the web platform and iPhone app, patients can access original medical records in PDF form and share emergency cards for caregivers.

MotherKnows is working on partnerships with schools, day cares and camps, so health officials can view and print updated child’s medical charts. At the start of programs, parents can save additional trips to the medical office just to get paperwork filled out.

“I want to integrate with as many stakeholders as possible,” Kutscher says. “Our long-term goal is to have largest database of kids health information in the country.”

The company has tailored the platform for parents with children. Other companies in the space offer electronic medical records for patients of all ages.

“We built the system to fit the needs of parents. It’s not a generic product. It should be a different experience when you’re 90 years old and 5 years old.”

From time of sign-up, it takes as little as two days and up to two weeks to receive a digital archive of your child’s health history. You can take these records to a new doctor right away.

Would you use MotherKnows to keep track of your child’s health? Tell us in the comments.


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Virtual patient gets funding injection

Virtual patient gets funding injection | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Key medical institutions have joined forces to liberate health education from its current physical limitations and have secured $4.5 million to develop online teaching tools that can be accessed via the national broadband network.


The Biomedical Education Skills and Training network (BEST) will create online training simulations to educate students in rural and remote locations. The proposed virtual education facility includes: a dissecting room, lab space, national medical image bank, patient clinic, and a diagnostic case book.

 

The medicine faculty of the University of NSW, a BEST member, has used virtual microscopy for the past four years, according to head of medicine Dr Nicholas Hawkins. It uses a virtual patient with symptoms to teach exercise physiology students. Depending on how the "patient" is treated they can be healed, hurt, or even killed.

 


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UK doctors must prepare for the rise of the ‘ePatient’

UK doctors must prepare for the rise of the ‘ePatient’ | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Doctors and other healthcare professionals must prepare for the rise of ‘ePatients’ in the coming years and keep apace with the evolving digital landscape.

 

This is according to the 2012 version of ‘Learning to manage Health Information’, a clinical education guide that has been running since 1999.

 

Its aim is to understand the digital world and healthcare professionals’ working requirements within it.

 

This year’s focus is on the rise of the ePatients, who come to surgeries armed with information found on the internet about their condition - and are often more digitally aware than their doctor.

The guide says that in the near future, clinicians will be dealing more and more with the ePatient, adding that: “today, such patients need not be mere recipients of care and can become key decision-makers in their treatment process.”


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A Doctor's Visit Without the Cold Stethoscope

A Doctor's Visit Without the Cold Stethoscope | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
It can take weeks to get a doctor's appointment and visiting the emergency room for a curious, but not so serious, ailment can be costly.

 

(...) "These telemedicine websites let people pose questions to a licensed doctor, paying $10 to $40. Some services offer free follow-ups and referrals as part of a more comprehensive treatment. We tested four services and asked questions on behalf of family and friends about health issues that didn't require an urgent trip to the doctor. These included swimmer's rash, an ingrown toenail and a pain above the eye. We didn't wait more than a day to get responses, but the quality of service varied significantly.

 

People typically use the services to supplement traditional doctor visits, since many of the doctors used by the sites aren't licensed to practice in every state. "There's a difference between advice and treatment," says Lyle Berkowitz, medical director of information technology and innovation at Northwestern Memorial Hospital's primary care group in Chicago." (...)

 

"The site works by engaging doctors to answer questions with an average of four weighing in on each answer, says Mr. Gutman. Doctors who weigh in are often located near the user's location, which enables physicians to market themselves and build their practice's clientele. People who want more detailed information can pay $9.99 for private consultation or schedule an in-person appointment."

 

via @mHealthSurgeon


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Experts discuss the ups and downs of implementing mobile health systems

Experts discuss the ups and downs of implementing mobile health systems | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The mobile health systems continue to develop at a rapid pace. Experts talk about the best new options and how to have a successful IT project.
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Patients use Google check a doctor reference check

Patients use Google check a doctor reference check | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

There are no longer any doubts if patients Google their doctors. Social media, your website, and Google are parts of virtually every patient’s search for a doctor. Google is a reference check and has become the most important tool to establish sufficient level of trust for an appointment to be scheduled.

I recently published 12 case studies where doctors’ reputations were improved with mobile technology and the impact they made on the goals of their practices. Here are the three most important pieces of information new patients are looking for that impact the success of your practice.

1. Your expertise. In every specialty with elective services, or when you’d like to get out-of-network or out-of-pocket patients, this is a requirement. If not prominently displayed people will go to another doctor. In areas like plastic surgery, dermatology, or orthopaedics, this very piece of information can save millions in advertising dollars.

2. Doctor review sites. One negative comment will certainly impact a patient’s trust in you, especially if it’s the only patient-review that is displayed on at least 30 different websites. Some doctor-review sites even display patient satisfaction levels, and it doesn’t matter if these reviews were posted 4 years ago, because all patients see is the % of satisfaction. This is the one piece of information that has been giving doctors trouble for a few years now, but with the newly available mobile technology you don’t have to be at the mercy of these review sites.

3. Patient satisfaction and customer service. What if the same mobile technology that helps gather & publish verified patient reviews, can help improve patient satisfaction and customer service? What if every patient was given a chance to provide honest feedback and you’d be able to review each comment and address potential problems before they become disasters? What if this can seamlessly become part of the process of every patient visit without you or your staff spending any extra time on this process?

Google is the most over-looked form of social media. You’re either at its mercy or using it to become the most trusted and relevant source of medical information.

It’s time to get your reputations in order and realize what your patients are doing. Step 1, go Google your name!

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healthcareitnews.com by Mobify

healthcareitnews.com by Mobify | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

DEARBORN, MI – The automotive industry has taken health IT out for a spin, and is liking the way the technology handles.

Officials at Ford Motor Company announced Thursday the advent of its new voice-activated mobile health application, which allows drivers to monitor external allergy, flu and UV conditions.Company officials say the Allergy Alert app enables allergy sufferers to safely monitor outdoor conditions that may cause symptoms such as scratchy eyes, sore throat and nasal congestion.

“What the app does is give you the pollen level at your location, along with the asthma, cough, cold and UV indexes, both on the day you ask it, as well as a four-day forecast," said Gary Strumolo, global manager of Ford Research and Innovation.

[See also: Ford looks to introduce health, wellness apps to its cars.]

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Safeguarding Hospitals From Data Infections | eHEALTH Magazine

Safeguarding Hospitals From Data Infections | eHEALTH Magazine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
This mundane building has showcased progress of electronic data basing of hospital records in the country. Microsoft tablets offer new possibilities for clinical use, but software vendors will need to bring new innovation to clinical app development.
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Do baby boomers use medical and health apps?

Do baby boomers use medical and health apps? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

When thinking about who uses medical and health apps, the baby boomer generation is usually not top of mind, however we may be underestimating how receptive this segment of the population might be. A recent blog post from amednews, titled “Baby boomers trust physicians’ recommendations on medical apps” provides a better sense of how baby boomers may interact with mobile health technology.

 

Some interesting data points about baby boomers referenced in the blog include:

 

71% would be willing to pay for an app

 

36% would spend $1 to $2 on an app

 

35% would spend up to $10

 

49% have downloaded six or more apps

 

28% have downloaded between one and five apps

 

15% have been diagnosed with heart disease

 

7% have been diagnosed with diabetes

 

2% have been diagnosed with heart disease and diabetes

 

60% are most likely to use an app recommended by a doctor

 

18% are most likely to use an app recommended by a family member

 

5% are most likely to use an app recommended by a friend

 

 


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The key to open patients' minds

The key to open patients' minds | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Advances in software and technology offer new tools and techniques to convey and reinforce your messages.

 

Anyone who spends five minutes with a computer can see that websites and social media are being used extensively by the healthcare industry, chiropractors included. Social media networking takes place through many websites and services, most notably the big three: Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

Some practices use computer-based tools like electronic health records and orthotic scanners. These technologies offer a lot of potential to doctors who are using them to their fullest.

 

Social media sites offer you two distinct advantages. First, your marketing efforts can instantly reach thousands of people and can be shared with many more. Second, these sites are usually free to use for personal networking as well as for business outreach. In the summer of 2010, Facebook confirmed that it had 500 million users and estimated that by June 2011 more than 750 million people (10 percent of the global population) were actively using the service.


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7 iPhone apps that need to be created for doctors

7 iPhone apps that need to be created for doctors | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
In spite of this seeming plethora of handy apps, there are still a few I have yet to encounter and would like to see created.
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Cool response to online health record scheme - Sydney Morning Herald

Cool response to online health record scheme - Sydney Morning Herald | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Sydney Morning HeraldCool response to online health record schemeH

Despite more than 15000 patients having consented to a shared e-health record in one Brisbane test area alone, only 5000 people have registered with the federal...

 

Sydney IT worker Garry Stevens last week detailed his experience in a letter to the Health Minister, in which he called the registration site a masterpiece of incompetence with interface issues including browser incompatibility, punctuation problems and irritating time-outs.
Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/patients-frustrated-by-ehealth-scheme-20120813-244jn.html#ixzz23noDH7D6

 


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To Find Your Heart Rate, Stare At This App

To Find Your Heart Rate, Stare At This App | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Your iPhone’s health monitoring capabilities just got a little more advanced. Cardiio, an app built by scientists from MIT, can quickly check your heart rate. All you have to do is stare at the phone--no touching required.

 

We first discovered Cardiio at Rock Health’s demo day, where the health startup incubator showed off the creations of its latest class. Like many of its Rock Health peers, Cardiio takes today’s technology (and ideas) one step further.

 

There are already apps that allow users to check their pulse by putting a finger over the iPhone camera, measuring changes in light intensity that correspond to blood pulses. Cardiio takes a similar tack--albeit one that’s more hands-off. The app measures the amount of light reflected off the face, which matches up to the amount of blood pumped into the face (every time the heart beats, more blood is pumped).

 

It’s simple to use: just stare at the app and wait for it to measure your heart beat. You can keep a running log of your heart rate at different hours and days. Cardiio also offers helpful statistics, revealing how your heart rate compares to an elite athlete and the average citizen. A lower resting heart rate generally indicates better physical fitness, though your heart rate may vary wildly throughout the day--according to the app, mine jumped from 59 to 81 and back down to 61 within the span of a couple hours.

 

In peer-reviewed literature, Cardiio’s heart rate measurements have shown to be within 3 beats per minute of a clinical pulse oximeter--the gold standard. That makes it more than accurate enough for non-medical uses (it’s not FDA approved).

 

Cardiio is available in the app store now for $4.99.


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Is mHealth just a tool or a widget that’s just like any other technology?

Is mHealth just a tool or a widget that’s just like any other technology? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A MobiHealthNews article by Neil Versel suggests that Mobile Health is “not a field”, merely “a widget” or “a tool” that’s “just like any other techn...

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Smartphone as Doctor

Smartphone as Doctor | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Some think that little computer you carry around with you is about to bring a sea change in the doctor-patient relationship. Is data power?
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Healthcare Mobile Apps - It's not the Consumer but the Healthcare Providers That Need Them

Healthcare Mobile Apps - It's not the Consumer but the Healthcare Providers That Need Them | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A recent article at Healthcare Collective takes the position – in asking the question, “What’s the Matter with Mobile Health Apps Today?” - that most mobile healthcare apps aren’t used, at least not beyond an initial download and trial, after which the apps are discarded as quickly as they were downloaded. The article also noted that healthcare apps have appeared in record numbers of late – from just under 3,000 to just over 13,600 of them. Most of these apps focus on personal healthcare, and most of them are redundant in terms of what they do – some do certain things better than others, but most are destined for the delete bin.

At the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) held in January 2012 there was an entire exhibiter space dedicated to mobile healthcare. We noted a potentially useful collection of applications, especially some that appeared to us to do a rather good job of checking vitals and keeping track of them. As we roamed the aisles, it turned out that there was one exhibiter – UnitedHealth Group, a rather major name in the health insurance industry – that had a significant booth there. Why?

Nick Martin, vice president of innovation, research and development at UnitedHealth Group says, “At UnitedHealth we believe that we need to use mobility to create a tight bond with our policyholders. Users know how to put their mobile devices to work, and this provides us with a means to communicate closely with them. We engage our users through experiences and interactions that are typically fun for the user, but that ultimately lead us to teach our clients how they can achieve savings on medical costs. Our mobile apps are accessible anytime and anywhere, but more specifically, they give our users the freedom to engage with us when they want to.”

“In our case it isn’t simply about providing some sort of health app that substitute for such things as tracking blood pressure,” Martin continued. “In our case we are looking to specifically provide real financial and medical benefits. It becomes a differentiator for us – and as long as we provide real value, the users keep coming back and using the apps.”

For Martin, the apps aren’t simply a means to earn a few pennies on an app download. The use of mobile apps is a specific healthcare driver that aids in direct user engagement, and one that will continue to grow significantly, not just for UnitedHealth, but for its competitors as well. From this perspective mobile health apps are doing extremely well.

Doctors and Mobile Apps

The Ottawa Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada is an example of a healthcare provider that has deployed an iPad mobile app - not for consumers but for doctors. The app, a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system, was deployed to more than 1,000 doctors. The goal Ottawa specifically had was to change the process that had evolved for doctors to gain information about patients – a process that involved keeping doctors glued to computers rather than keeping them out in the field, so to speak, where they could visit in meaningful ways in face to face conversations with their patients.

Once the doctors became mobile through the iPad and the CPOE app, there was an immediate, measureable and very positive impact in the doctor-patient relationship. Doctors were able to gain substantial valuable time back, time that was then devoted entirely to face-to-face patient visits on a daily basis. Patients were able to sense a difference in terms of the quality of engagement, and doctors were able to specifically hone in on what patients needed right at the point of their interactions.

Having iPads in hand, providing immediate patient information, vitals, and other valuable insights literally at their fingertips changed the doctor-patient relationship from a reactive to a proactive one. Proactive engagement, in turn, allowed patients – as well as other family members – to collaborate on medications, treatment alternatives and medical reviews. Ottawa Hospital officials say that engaged patients take a much stronger interest in their own treatments, a perhaps subtle but significant change that increases overall treatment benefits.

These are but two of numerous examples of where the real value in mobility is to be found in the healthcare industry. Whether engaging with an insurance company, a pharmacy or a doctor (or a nurse or an intern…you get the picture), mobility drives immediate engagement with caregivers. It is the immediate engagement between the caregiver and patient that makes the difference.

Other mobile app examples include those that provide secure, real time patient data – an extremely valuable service in the emergency room, those that monitor patients through their mobile devices, and those that communicate real time information – whether between doctor and patient, or doctor and doctor in consultative situations.

The bottom line is that consumer apps that do very simple things are of likely very little value – and simply not worth talking about. Those that aid doctors, emergency rooms, nurses, and so on, and those that drive better patient-health provider/doctor engagement or that monitor health from the perspectives described here, are the real mobile applications that matter in any discussion of mobile healthcare.

Tony Rizzo has spent over 25 years in high tech publishing and joins HealthTechZone after a stint as Editor in Chief of Mobile Enterprise Magazine, which followed a two year stretch on the mobile vendor side of the world. Tony also spent five years as the Director of Mobile Research for 451 Research. Before his jump into mobility Tony spent a year as a publishing consultant for CMP Media, and served as the Editor in Chief of Internet World, NetGuide and Network Computing. He was the founding Technical Editor of Microsoft Systems Journal.

Edited by Rachel Ramsey

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Stop designing studies around outcomes that don't matter to patients

Stop designing studies around outcomes that don't matter to patients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Eve Harris writes:

 

'Researchers should stop designing inquiries around outcomes that don’t matter to patients. We reviewed some studies that seemed better suited for mice but were nonetheless conducted in humans.

 

Overall, though, it appears that patient perspectives and values are increasingly part of research design. The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) is funding exciting new studies. In a recent article, PCORI explains “Why Methods Matter.”

 

The healthcare delivery systems of today differ markedly from those of the past, and the way care is delivered can have a profound impact on outcomes. These factors combine to make it difficult, but critical, for patients and their care providers to understand and use the research information most relevant to the health decisions they make.

 

Providers and patients are making progress in defining and trying out new ways of communicating about clinical decisions. Achieving the best outcomes via this newer, more participatory practice of medicine requires attention not only to the evidence provided by high quality studies but also clinical judgment and respect for the bottom line: patient values.'


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New Animated Video Explains How Advancements in Technology are Giving You Tools and Access to Information to Manage Your Health | Health IT Buzz

New Animated Video Explains How Advancements in Technology are Giving You Tools and Access to Information to Manage Your Health | Health IT Buzz | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

It’s time health care caught up with the way we live the rest of our lives. Technology has transformed the way we bank, shop, travel and communicate; yet, health care has lagged far behind.ONC has posted 3:00 minute and 60-second versions of an animated video for consumers that explains how widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and other technology is helping to give the U.S. health care system a 21st Century upgrade—creating one that is smarter and more responsive to the needs of patients, their families, and their health care providers.

Electronic Access to Your Health Information and Health Apps to Manage Your Health and Well Being

Increased adoption of EHR technology by health care professionals is reshaping health care, converting our paper medical records into digital records that can be available when and where our health information needed. At the same time, there has been an explosion in the number of consumer health applications available from 2,993 in February 2010 to 13,619 in April 2012 [i].

Although technology is becoming more widespread, adoption of this technology is low—only 10 percent of Americans have downloaded a health application on their mobile phone to manage some aspect of their health [ii]. And, despite the fact that two out of three people would consider switching to a physician who offers a way to access their medical record through a secure Internet connection, only 17 percent of Americans have ever asked their provider for electronic access to their medical record [iii].

ONC Initiatives to Motivate and Inspire Patients and Families To Use Technology

These new videos, which will be available in Spanish later in the summer, are one of several of our current efforts to help convey the benefits of health IT and other consumer e-health tools to spur patients and families to take control of their health using technology.

We are also crowd sourcing personal stories about how people are managing their health using technology as part of the 2012 Health IT Video Contest series. The “What’s In Your Health Record Video Contest?” (http://yourrecord.challenge.gov) (#YourHealthRecord) was recently launched, and we are accepting video submissions through August 23. Cash prizes will be awarded to the producers of the winning videos.

We hope these efforts will ignite more conversations about the benefits of getting access to your medical record and using the information in the record, and other tools, to take greater control of your health or to help manage the care of a loved one.

Special thanks to our esteemed advisors for this project—Alexandra Drane, Eva Powell, Shirley Bergin, Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, Julie Norris, Peter Basch, and Regina Holliday—who helped guide the content and style of the videos to make sure it was meaningful to the American public.

Join the Conversation and Tell Others About It!

We encourage you to watch the videos and share them with your friends and family or to embed a copy on your website. We also invite you to enter our video contest or to encourage others to do so.

ONC would also like to hear from you about how we can improve the Patients & Families section of HealthIT.gov and other resources, like the videos.

Tell us…

What did you think about the videos?For individuals, what other materials or resources would be helpful to add to HealthIT.gov to address questions or concerns that may arise from watching the videos?For organizations, what other materials or resources would be helpful to help you educate and inform your audience about ways to leverage technology to achieve better health?How are you managing your health using technology?Any other feedback?

For more information on health information technology, visit HealthIT.gov.

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How to Turn Your Smartphone Into An Emergency Kit

How to Turn Your Smartphone Into An Emergency Kit | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Michael Soenen is the chairman and CEO of EmergencyLink, a free medical ID network which makes it easy for anyone to be prepared for an emergency. Follow the company @EmergencyLink. Technology can help you find a restaurant, locate a parking spot, and even get you a date. But how can mobile apps impact the more crucial aspects of a person’s life, like safety and well being?

While apps can’t replace your doctor or local police, there are many that can make a major difference in an emergency. Here are nine that will help you prepare for, react to, and report such situations.

Prepare

Emergency preparedness isn’t just about extra batteries and jugs of drinking water. It’s about making sure you have access to the right information when you need it most. The following apps allow you to prepare for emergencies before they occur.

pMonitor: pMonitor lets parents use location alerts to, for example, know when a child arrives at school or is headed home. Users can create alerts for potentially dangerous situations as well. So if you have an elderly parent, you can set an alert that will ping you if that person happens to fall. In other words, this app will let you know whenever a loved one is in a bad situation so that you can respond.Pocket First Aid and CPR: This app is useful to keep in your phone as a CPR tutorial. It can’t replace a certification, but it does offer best-practice reminders on how to properly administer this life-saving technique. It can be particularly useful to have a mobile app to walk you through the steps during a crisis when it’s easy to seize up.Safety NET: This app is great for an elderly parent or a disabled loved one, as it monitors for things like falls or collisions. It then automatically alerts a previously selected emergency contact to call for help.

React

Preparedness is one important element of safety, and there are some great apps that help you take control in emergency situations.

Silent Bodyguard: This app serves as a silent panic button that calls the police without setting off any alarms. The panic message can also send a text to a loved one or a post to your social accounts. It will also use your phone to share your coordinates with, say, police officials.Poison Center Help: The free Poison Center Help app allows users dealing with someone who has ingested poison or been exposed to a dangerous substance to quickly connect to the poison control center to find out what side effects to expect, and how to address them.KidsDoc: Your pediatrician may be on speed dial, but this app could save you a few middle-of-the-night phone calls. KidsDoc allows you to input symptoms to find out what common ailment might be bugging your child. It also offers simple treatments.

Report

The faster an emergency gets reported, the sooner help can arrive. Dialing 911 is a great first step, but here are some other handy tools for sharing emergency information.

Neighborhood Watch Official Mobile App: The Neighborhood Watch has gone digital. With this app, you can access training videos and best practices for keeping your neighborhood safe. You can also submit details about local crimes and make sure things get reported.SaferBus: This free app monitors performance of public transit and allows you to report unsafe driving, improper conditions, rowdiness, and other issues on public transportation systems.iWitness Now you’re covered anywhere you go. This app allows users to report what they see while auto-tracking their position for easy reporting.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, Sashkinw


Via Debora Plehn, michel verstrepen
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Which activities are preferred on tablets vs phones? Keynote tells all

Which activities are preferred on tablets vs phones? Keynote tells all | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A new survey explains that the no. 1 frustration on tablets and smartphones is the slow loading of web pages. That shouldn’t surprise, but the preferred activities for a smartphone and a tablet just might, suggesting that we’re not ready to dump the phone just yet.

There’s not only a large amount of overlap in activities between smartphones and tablets, but owners of both device types also agree they want a faster mobile web experience. The data comes from Keynote’s Mobile User Survey (PDF), which the company published on Monday after surveying 5,388 people who owned either, or both, a smartphone and a tablet. The top “mobile frustration” is that slow mobile page load time, event though 27 percent of respondents use their device on a 4G network.

The results may not surprise, as Keynote Systems is a San Mateo, CA-based mobile web monitoring company. But in speaking to many mobile users on my own, most do cite slow page load times as a challenge; particularly over mobile broadband. So I dug a little deeper into the survey results to see what other interesting insights might surface. It turns out that when looking at which activities both devices are used for, some of the data addresses my idea of tablets potentially replacing smartphones.

Last week I had said that there were very few activities that were actually better on a phone than on a tablet and Keynote’s survey results indicate what some of those might be. Social networking is one such activity — 46 percent of smartphone users update their networks while only 31 percent do so on a tablet. These updates are small chunks of content, so I could see why one might reach for a phone first.

Maps was another such activity, which I find semi-surprising. Half of the respondents prefer to access navigation and maps from a phone while only 3o percent prefer doing so on a tablet. Map experiences are far richer on a larger display, but not all tablets have the constant connectivity and GPS functionality found in phones. And if you want navigation and directions, a handheld device works just fine.

As I noted prior, digital media content consumption on a tablet often provides a better experience and the Keynote survey data echoes that thought: 76 percent of tablet owners watch videos, while 59 percent do so on their smartphone. Other activities where a tablet is used more? Reading news or entertainment; product and services research; reading 0r posting to blogs; and online purchases to name a few.

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