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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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New Animated Video Explains How Advancements in Technology are Giving You Tools and Access to Information to Manage Your Health | Health IT Buzz

New Animated Video Explains How Advancements in Technology are Giving You Tools and Access to Information to Manage Your Health | Health IT Buzz | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

It’s time health care caught up with the way we live the rest of our lives. Technology has transformed the way we bank, shop, travel and communicate; yet, health care has lagged far behind.ONC has posted 3:00 minute and 60-second versions of an animated video for consumers that explains how widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and other technology is helping to give the U.S. health care system a 21st Century upgrade—creating one that is smarter and more responsive to the needs of patients, their families, and their health care providers.

Electronic Access to Your Health Information and Health Apps to Manage Your Health and Well Being

Increased adoption of EHR technology by health care professionals is reshaping health care, converting our paper medical records into digital records that can be available when and where our health information needed. At the same time, there has been an explosion in the number of consumer health applications available from 2,993 in February 2010 to 13,619 in April 2012 [i].

Although technology is becoming more widespread, adoption of this technology is low—only 10 percent of Americans have downloaded a health application on their mobile phone to manage some aspect of their health [ii]. And, despite the fact that two out of three people would consider switching to a physician who offers a way to access their medical record through a secure Internet connection, only 17 percent of Americans have ever asked their provider for electronic access to their medical record [iii].

ONC Initiatives to Motivate and Inspire Patients and Families To Use Technology

These new videos, which will be available in Spanish later in the summer, are one of several of our current efforts to help convey the benefits of health IT and other consumer e-health tools to spur patients and families to take control of their health using technology.

We are also crowd sourcing personal stories about how people are managing their health using technology as part of the 2012 Health IT Video Contest series. The “What’s In Your Health Record Video Contest?” (http://yourrecord.challenge.gov) (#YourHealthRecord) was recently launched, and we are accepting video submissions through August 23. Cash prizes will be awarded to the producers of the winning videos.

We hope these efforts will ignite more conversations about the benefits of getting access to your medical record and using the information in the record, and other tools, to take greater control of your health or to help manage the care of a loved one.

Special thanks to our esteemed advisors for this project—Alexandra Drane, Eva Powell, Shirley Bergin, Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, Julie Norris, Peter Basch, and Regina Holliday—who helped guide the content and style of the videos to make sure it was meaningful to the American public.

Join the Conversation and Tell Others About It!

We encourage you to watch the videos and share them with your friends and family or to embed a copy on your website. We also invite you to enter our video contest or to encourage others to do so.

ONC would also like to hear from you about how we can improve the Patients & Families section of HealthIT.gov and other resources, like the videos.

Tell us…

What did you think about the videos?For individuals, what other materials or resources would be helpful to add to HealthIT.gov to address questions or concerns that may arise from watching the videos?For organizations, what other materials or resources would be helpful to help you educate and inform your audience about ways to leverage technology to achieve better health?How are you managing your health using technology?Any other feedback?

For more information on health information technology, visit HealthIT.gov.

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How to Turn Your Smartphone Into An Emergency Kit

How to Turn Your Smartphone Into An Emergency Kit | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Michael Soenen is the chairman and CEO of EmergencyLink, a free medical ID network which makes it easy for anyone to be prepared for an emergency. Follow the company @EmergencyLink. Technology can help you find a restaurant, locate a parking spot, and even get you a date. But how can mobile apps impact the more crucial aspects of a person’s life, like safety and well being?

While apps can’t replace your doctor or local police, there are many that can make a major difference in an emergency. Here are nine that will help you prepare for, react to, and report such situations.

Prepare

Emergency preparedness isn’t just about extra batteries and jugs of drinking water. It’s about making sure you have access to the right information when you need it most. The following apps allow you to prepare for emergencies before they occur.

pMonitor: pMonitor lets parents use location alerts to, for example, know when a child arrives at school or is headed home. Users can create alerts for potentially dangerous situations as well. So if you have an elderly parent, you can set an alert that will ping you if that person happens to fall. In other words, this app will let you know whenever a loved one is in a bad situation so that you can respond.Pocket First Aid and CPR: This app is useful to keep in your phone as a CPR tutorial. It can’t replace a certification, but it does offer best-practice reminders on how to properly administer this life-saving technique. It can be particularly useful to have a mobile app to walk you through the steps during a crisis when it’s easy to seize up.Safety NET: This app is great for an elderly parent or a disabled loved one, as it monitors for things like falls or collisions. It then automatically alerts a previously selected emergency contact to call for help.

React

Preparedness is one important element of safety, and there are some great apps that help you take control in emergency situations.

Silent Bodyguard: This app serves as a silent panic button that calls the police without setting off any alarms. The panic message can also send a text to a loved one or a post to your social accounts. It will also use your phone to share your coordinates with, say, police officials.Poison Center Help: The free Poison Center Help app allows users dealing with someone who has ingested poison or been exposed to a dangerous substance to quickly connect to the poison control center to find out what side effects to expect, and how to address them.KidsDoc: Your pediatrician may be on speed dial, but this app could save you a few middle-of-the-night phone calls. KidsDoc allows you to input symptoms to find out what common ailment might be bugging your child. It also offers simple treatments.

Report

The faster an emergency gets reported, the sooner help can arrive. Dialing 911 is a great first step, but here are some other handy tools for sharing emergency information.

Neighborhood Watch Official Mobile App: The Neighborhood Watch has gone digital. With this app, you can access training videos and best practices for keeping your neighborhood safe. You can also submit details about local crimes and make sure things get reported.SaferBus: This free app monitors performance of public transit and allows you to report unsafe driving, improper conditions, rowdiness, and other issues on public transportation systems.iWitness Now you’re covered anywhere you go. This app allows users to report what they see while auto-tracking their position for easy reporting.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, Sashkinw


Via Debora Plehn, michel verstrepen
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Which activities are preferred on tablets vs phones? Keynote tells all

Which activities are preferred on tablets vs phones? Keynote tells all | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A new survey explains that the no. 1 frustration on tablets and smartphones is the slow loading of web pages. That shouldn’t surprise, but the preferred activities for a smartphone and a tablet just might, suggesting that we’re not ready to dump the phone just yet.

There’s not only a large amount of overlap in activities between smartphones and tablets, but owners of both device types also agree they want a faster mobile web experience. The data comes from Keynote’s Mobile User Survey (PDF), which the company published on Monday after surveying 5,388 people who owned either, or both, a smartphone and a tablet. The top “mobile frustration” is that slow mobile page load time, event though 27 percent of respondents use their device on a 4G network.

The results may not surprise, as Keynote Systems is a San Mateo, CA-based mobile web monitoring company. But in speaking to many mobile users on my own, most do cite slow page load times as a challenge; particularly over mobile broadband. So I dug a little deeper into the survey results to see what other interesting insights might surface. It turns out that when looking at which activities both devices are used for, some of the data addresses my idea of tablets potentially replacing smartphones.

Last week I had said that there were very few activities that were actually better on a phone than on a tablet and Keynote’s survey results indicate what some of those might be. Social networking is one such activity — 46 percent of smartphone users update their networks while only 31 percent do so on a tablet. These updates are small chunks of content, so I could see why one might reach for a phone first.

Maps was another such activity, which I find semi-surprising. Half of the respondents prefer to access navigation and maps from a phone while only 3o percent prefer doing so on a tablet. Map experiences are far richer on a larger display, but not all tablets have the constant connectivity and GPS functionality found in phones. And if you want navigation and directions, a handheld device works just fine.

As I noted prior, digital media content consumption on a tablet often provides a better experience and the Keynote survey data echoes that thought: 76 percent of tablet owners watch videos, while 59 percent do so on their smartphone. Other activities where a tablet is used more? Reading news or entertainment; product and services research; reading 0r posting to blogs; and online purchases to name a few.

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Interesting! Deloitte Review | Consumerism in Health Care | Insights to engagement #hcsm #hcsmeufr #hcsmeu

Interesting! Deloitte Review | Consumerism in Health Care | Insights to engagement #hcsm #hcsmeufr #hcsmeu | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Insights to engagement.(Consumerism in Health Care - http://t.co/l0erw4fi #healthcare #medicine...)...


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The Future Of Health Care Is You

The Future Of Health Care Is You | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Devices like smartphones, Fuelbands, and Fitbits are capturing increasingly insightful data, giving us instant feedback on our health, from how we eat, sleep, and exercise, to our heart rates, blood pressure, and stress levels. For those seeking more complex data about themselves, companies like Wellness FX, 23&Me, and San Intelligence are offering the chance to look at our own individual blood chemistry and DNA and make healthier choices based on that info.

 

The technology is going to progress faster than we realize. Soon we’re going to be drinking milkshakes containing microchips that can feed back to us the state of our physical selves in real-time. And as we reach that point, the most productive health change you can make is to exercise a little better or eat a little more mindfully.


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Big Data: the key to solving healthcare's data problems?

Big Data: the key to solving healthcare's data problems? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Lorraine Lawson writes:

 

'Oracle recently released a report noting, among other things, that healthcare isn’t prepared to manage Big Data. That’s hardly shocking, since healthcare seems largely inept at managing any data, much less Big Data, which is generally defined as having one or more of these characteristics:

 

* Variety, meaning structured, semi-structured and unstructured data
* Velocity, meaning you want it moved at high speeds
* Volume, think petabytes and terabytes

 

Maybe health care IT doesn’t have a data problem so much as it has a Big Data problem.

 

What do I mean? Well, most health care records actually fall into the domain of Big Data more than your typical, relational database kind of data. Specifically:

 

* Most health care records are actually unstructured data, e.g., text documents or images. Doctor’s notes on patients, nurse’s care plans, lab results, x-rays and MRI results all fall well outside the domain of structured data. I


* Health care data is often high volume, particularly when you’re talking about a state or national electronic health records system. What’s more, when you deal with images, like x-rays or other scans, you’re increasing the data’s volume in terms of storage requirements.


* Finally, most health care records need to be moved relatively quickly, and as individual records. So, if I’m having a consult tomorrow with a surgeon, then the x-rays need to be at the office by morning.

 

It looks like there’s a clear use case for Big Data technologies in health care.

 

In fact, if I may be so bold, maybe health care’s data problems are not entirely caused by niche vendors, data silos and a lack of investment.

 

Maybe the reason health care IT is such a mess is because the existing tools couldn’t handle Big Data needs in an affordable way.


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Mango Health nabs $1.45M to build gamified mobile health apps

Mango Health nabs $1.45M to build gamified mobile health apps | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Former executives from mobile gaming company ngmoco are set to launch Mango Health, a San Francisco-based health startup focused on developing mobile applications that use game design principles to help consumers improve and manage their health.

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Mango Health: A Mobile App For Rewarding People Who Stay On Track With Prescription Drugs | TechCrunch

Mango Health: A Mobile App For Rewarding People Who Stay On Track With Prescription Drugs  | TechCrunch | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Adherence to prescription drugs and supplements is a problem that not only puts the long-term health of millions of patients at risk. It's a problem that may add an extra $100 to 300 billion in health care costs in the U.S.

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Augmented Reality – Making Paper Interactive | Upside Learning Blog

Augmented Reality – Making Paper Interactive | Upside Learning Blog | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Clients who already use paper-based materials for distribution or in an instructor-led environment often ask us how we can enhance the learning experience for...

[...] One of our clients actually took it a step futher – they are now printing QR codes on all their product labels that are directly tied to ‘just-in-time’ use resources – videos that show the product being used, Dos and Don’ts, and the ability to subscribe to advanced courseware linked to the product. Rather than pushing or forcing training on individuals, provide information at the point of need, where learners value it because it helps them do the task at hand. (more about this later).

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Increased Use of Health IT Altering Physician-Patient Relationships

Increased Use of Health IT Altering Physician-Patient Relationships | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Electronic health record systems are changing how physicians and patients communicate in the doctor's office, and new medical websites are helping patients become more involved in their health care.

 

The growing prevalence of electronic health record systems and other technologies is transforming how physicians and patients interact, the Boston Globe reports.


Technology-Fueled Changes


Some of the technology-related changes affecting the health care system are:

Physicians using EHR systems to enter patient data during office visits; Patients using medical websites to find information about their health conditions before seeking a physician's opinion; and Patients and physicians communicating via email.

Implications of EHR Use


Both physicians and patients have expressed concern that the use of EHR systems could interfere with personal communication between physicians and patients during visits.


Joseph Kvedar -- director of the Center for Connected Health, a division of Partners HealthCare -- said he attempts to mitigate such concerns by turning his computer screen so the patient can view what he is entering into the EHR. Kvedar said, "They won't think I'm writing secret thoughts into a computer."


Patient Use of Medical Websites

 

According to the Society for Participatory Medicine, patients' use of medical websites like WebMD.com have allowed patients to "shift from being mere passengers to responsible drivers of their health, in which providers encourage and value them as full partners."

 

However, some physicians have expressed concern that medical websites will lead patients to incorrectly self-diagnose an illness or worry unnecessarily about their symptoms.

 

Email Communications

 

Although many patients are interested in emailing their physicians to ask health-related questions, some physicians are concerned that email communications could lead to patient privacy breaches or malpractice lawsuits.

 

Meanwhile, other physicians say they like emailing with patients because it saves time.

 

Larry Cohan -- a pediatrician who practices in Braintree, Mass. and Boston -- said email can "knock off some easy questions without having to set up an appointment" (English, Boston Globe, 7/20).


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Social Networks in Health Care | JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association | Social Networks in Health CareSo Much to LearnSocial Networks in Health Care

Social Networks in Health Care | JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association | Social Networks in Health CareSo Much to LearnSocial Networks in Health Care | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Because many of the policy changes now under way in the US health care system are intended to foster collaboration and improve coordination among physicians, understanding physician social networks will be important. In this editorial, JAMA provides a brief overview of the report by Landon et al, explain its relationship to other work, and discuss the potential importance of deepening the understanding of social networks in health care.

 

The study by Landon and colleagues uses data on the connections—intentional and unintentional—created by shared patients to describe the structure of the networks that connect physicians in a diverse sample of US hospital referral regions (HRRs). The authors suggested knowledge of these natural social networks may be useful to those striving to improve coordination, such as payers forming accountable care organizations (ACOs) or hospitals worried about readmissions.

 

Many of the policy reforms now under way—episode payments, the patient-centered medical home (with its emphasis on care coordination), and ACOs—are intended to address these problems. At their core, these reforms are social innovations. The explicit intent is to encourage collaboration among physicians, other clinicians, and hospitals to improve care not only for individual patients (by coordinating the care delivered by multiple clinicians across space and time) but also for populations (by developing shared clinical pathways that ensure the best possible care for patients with specific health problems).


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Diagnosis Promising For mHealth

Diagnosis Promising For mHealth | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
mHealth is an emerging trend in technology. It stands for 'mobile healthcare' and means utilizing smartphones and medical mobile devices to help diagnose and monitor health conditions.

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Physicians Don\'t Adequately Monitor Patients\' Medication Adherence

Physicians Don\'t Adequately Monitor Patients\' Medication Adherence | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Patients' non-adherence to prescribed medication costs the U.S.health care system an estimated $290 billion annually and can lead to poor clinical outcomes, increased hospitalizations and higher mortality.


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Patients use Google check a doctor reference check

Patients use Google check a doctor reference check | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

There are no longer any doubts if patients Google their doctors. Social media, your website, and Google are parts of virtually every patient’s search for a doctor. Google is a reference check and has become the most important tool to establish sufficient level of trust for an appointment to be scheduled.

I recently published 12 case studies where doctors’ reputations were improved with mobile technology and the impact they made on the goals of their practices. Here are the three most important pieces of information new patients are looking for that impact the success of your practice.

1. Your expertise. In every specialty with elective services, or when you’d like to get out-of-network or out-of-pocket patients, this is a requirement. If not prominently displayed people will go to another doctor. In areas like plastic surgery, dermatology, or orthopaedics, this very piece of information can save millions in advertising dollars.

2. Doctor review sites. One negative comment will certainly impact a patient’s trust in you, especially if it’s the only patient-review that is displayed on at least 30 different websites. Some doctor-review sites even display patient satisfaction levels, and it doesn’t matter if these reviews were posted 4 years ago, because all patients see is the % of satisfaction. This is the one piece of information that has been giving doctors trouble for a few years now, but with the newly available mobile technology you don’t have to be at the mercy of these review sites.

3. Patient satisfaction and customer service. What if the same mobile technology that helps gather & publish verified patient reviews, can help improve patient satisfaction and customer service? What if every patient was given a chance to provide honest feedback and you’d be able to review each comment and address potential problems before they become disasters? What if this can seamlessly become part of the process of every patient visit without you or your staff spending any extra time on this process?

Google is the most over-looked form of social media. You’re either at its mercy or using it to become the most trusted and relevant source of medical information.

It’s time to get your reputations in order and realize what your patients are doing. Step 1, go Google your name!

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healthcareitnews.com by Mobify

healthcareitnews.com by Mobify | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

DEARBORN, MI – The automotive industry has taken health IT out for a spin, and is liking the way the technology handles.

Officials at Ford Motor Company announced Thursday the advent of its new voice-activated mobile health application, which allows drivers to monitor external allergy, flu and UV conditions.Company officials say the Allergy Alert app enables allergy sufferers to safely monitor outdoor conditions that may cause symptoms such as scratchy eyes, sore throat and nasal congestion.

“What the app does is give you the pollen level at your location, along with the asthma, cough, cold and UV indexes, both on the day you ask it, as well as a four-day forecast," said Gary Strumolo, global manager of Ford Research and Innovation.

[See also: Ford looks to introduce health, wellness apps to its cars.]

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Safeguarding Hospitals From Data Infections | eHEALTH Magazine

Safeguarding Hospitals From Data Infections | eHEALTH Magazine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
This mundane building has showcased progress of electronic data basing of hospital records in the country. Microsoft tablets offer new possibilities for clinical use, but software vendors will need to bring new innovation to clinical app development.
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Which Health monitor would you wear

Which Health monitor would you wear | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Misfit Wearables are developing highly wearable sensor products and services for wellness and medical applications.

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Here's why tablets (yes, tablets!) will replace the smartphone

Here's why tablets (yes, tablets!) will replace the smartphone | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Though I don't totally agree with it - namely because of the voice part (picking up a device will always be simpler than connecting a headset to answer a call) - this is an interesting review of the all-tablet case.

Maybe a hybrid tablet + Bluetooth headset combo could do the trick?

But then again we love using our phones with just one hand, don't we?


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Don’t forget, mobile is but a tool in the wider effort to improve healthcare | mobihealthnews

Don’t forget, mobile is but a tool in the wider effort to improve healthcare | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
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Social ROI and the healthcare professional: money and/or service?

Social ROI and the healthcare professional: money and/or service? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Howard Luks (@hjluks) writes:

 

'There are many physicians out there who practice, not to bring in as much $ as possible, but to help as many people as possible'


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Harvard's Connected Health Docs Service Fortune 500 Clients

Harvard's Connected Health Docs Service Fortune 500 Clients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Partners Healthcare specialists will work with CHS Healthcare Services, a large onsite clinic operator, to provide telemedicine services to its corporate clients.

 

CHS will initially market Partners' Online Specialty Consultation Services to its Fortune 500 customers across the country. Employees of companies that buy the service will be able to get second opinions from the 4,000 specialists who work at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Partners' flagship institutions in Boston.


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Janssen launches mobile medication reminder service - PMLiVE

Janssen launches mobile medication reminder service  - PMLiVE | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Janssen launches mobile medication reminder service - Care4Today is available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry smartphones as well as 'feature phones'

Care4Today was developed by Janssen’s San Diego-based Healthcare Innovation team, an entrepreneurial unit within Janssen Research & Development that was set up last year.

“Janssen Healthcare Innovation is developing products and services to transform the patient experience and promote better health outcomes. We have identified improving medication adherence as one of our key initiatives,” said Diego Miralles, the head of Janssen Healthcare Innovation.


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Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME).

 

SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency.

 

SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine.

 

In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME.

 

Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education.


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How social media is changing the patient-physician relationship

How social media is changing the patient-physician relationship | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

You’re in the doctor’s office as she tells you that she’s very sorry, but you have lymphoma. Later, before you walk out of her chilly exam room and into your changed life, when you ask how you can find out more about your disease, she says, “Whatever you do, don’t go looking on the Internet.”


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Adidas micoach Elite System unveiled. The beginning of Datatainment ?

Adidas micoach Elite System unveiled. The beginning of Datatainment ? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

As tomorrow night will be held the first Smart Soccer match which is to oppose the MLS All Star Team with Chelsea FC on Phily's Chester Stadium, Adidas unveiled its micoach Elite System.

The micoach Elite System includes a small data cell that fits into a player’s base layer in a protective pocket on the back between the shoulder blades. Connected by a series of electrodes and sensors woven into the fabric of the base layer, the cell wirelessly transmits more than 200 data records per second from each player to a central computer and then is displayed in a series of simplified insights and results on the coach’s iPad. At the touch of his fingertips, a coach can monitor the workload of an individual player, compare one athlete with another or view the whole team to gain a complete picture of the squad.


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