Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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The coming health care singularity

The coming health care singularity | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Adrian Gropper, MD writes:

 

According to Wikipedia, the Technological Singularity is the hypothetical future emergence of greater-than-human superintelligence through technological means. The Healthcare singularity could be the time when patients have access to better information and make better decisions than their physicians. The drive to this near future is fueled by the open and globaIized energy of patients as compared to physicians handicapped by closed and parochial health IT.


Physicians have skills. Institutions have capital. Patients have freedom, and that is what tips the information balance in their favor. When it comes to health IT, physicians and institutions are still busy installing closed, proprietary, single-vendor systems that erect strategic barriers to communications every chance they get. The protection of professional licensure and institutional consolidation gives both parties a sense of security even as the patient and policymaker barbarians are massing on the Web.


The Institute of Medicine just released Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America. Aside from reaffirming the $765 billion of “Excess Costs”, the study highlights the following:

 

The committee also believes that opportunities exist for attacking these problems— opportunities that did not exist even a decade ago.

 

* Vast computational power (with associated sophistication of information technology) has become affordable and widely available. This capability makes it possible to harvest useful information from actual patient care (as opposed to one-time studies), something that previously was impossible.

 

* Connectivity allows that power to be accessed in real time virtually anywhere by professionals and patients, permitting unprecedented diffusion of information cheaply, quickly, and on demand.

 

* Progress in human and organizational capabilities and management science can improve the reliability and efficiency of care, permitting more scientific deployment of human and technical resources to match the complexity of systems and institutions.

 

* Increasing empowerment of patients unleashes the potential for their participation, in concert with clinicians, in the prevention and treatment of disease—tasks that increasingly depend on personal behavior change.

 

Among many other conclusions, they say:

 

Conclusion: Advances in computing, information science, and connectivity can improve patient-clinician communication, point-of-care guidance, the capture of experience, population surveillance, planning and evaluation, and the generation of real-time knowledge—features of a continuously learning health care system.


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Quantified self leader Fitbit launches two new digital health trackers

Quantified self leader Fitbit launches two new digital health trackers | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Fitbit, the market leader in the Digital Health & Fitness category, unveiled two new trackers, the Fitbit Zip Wireless Activity Tracker and the Fitbit One Activity + Sleep Tracker--reinventing the category once again. The first all-day digital health & fitness trackers to offer Bluetooth 4.0/Smart compatibility, Zip and One have been redesigned to fit more seamlessly into people's everyday lives, making it easier than ever to count steps taken, distance traveled and calories burned, track your fitness trends, challenge and share with others, and earn fitness badges.

 

In addition to the two new trackers, Fitbit also released an updated iPhone app to allow these trackers to sync through Bluetooth Smart devices, like the iPhone 4S. The free Fitbit app, available on all iPhones and Android devices, now allows you to track activity charts and leaderboards and log food and other workouts on the go. Starting in October, your fitness stats will sync automatically to notify you when you are near or meet your daily goals and share your standings on fitness challenges in real time. Like earlier Fitbit trackers, Zip and One also wirelessly and automatically upload your information to any computer for deeper insight and more information.

 

"People are growing increasingly aware about how little we move and how we need to move more throughout the day," said James Park, CEO and founder of Fitbit. "Fitbit is dedicated to helping people achieve health and fitness with products that are well designed, beautiful, easy, and fit seamlessly into their lives. To get people moving, we know that people want a tracker that will accurately inform and motivate them to move throughout the day. We are launching Zip and One to encourage our users to get fit--in their own way."

 

Zip is offered in retail stores and at Fitbit.com for $59.95; One, which will replace the best-selling Ultra, will be available for sale later this fall at $99.95.


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New UK store wants to certify health apps, Articles | MobileHealthLive

New UK store wants to certify health apps

Published: 3 days ago

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UK firm Cambridge Healthcare, which has just launched what it claims is Europe’s first health-focused app store, is developing a certification programme whose aim is to reassure patients and health professionals that apps in the store have passed certain minimum standards.

The firm is currently working on the programme and hopes to make an announcement on October 3, according to an interview via email by Mobile Health Live with Dawson King, Cambridge Healthcare’s founder and CEO.

A similar move was made recently by Happtique, the US store which is probably the market leader in health apps and has reached a similar conclusion that a process of certifying apps is needed to push adoption forward.

The US store recently published a draft set of standards that it will use to certify medical, health and fitness apps that it offers. The aim of Happtique’s programme is to put users’ minds at rest while also offering advice to physicians. The criteria include operability, privacy, security and content reliability. Presumably, Cambridge Healthcare will be planning something along similar lines.

The company's app store is part of its wider personal health record service which is free in the UK (although obviously some developers might charge for their apps). Its business model involves commercially licensing its technology internationally. It is already present in the Chinese market. The company's background is as as a product of the NHS. It was spun off from the East of England NHS Innovation Council and East of England Strategic Health Authority.

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Why Your mHealth Brand Needs a Mobile Strategist

Why Your mHealth Brand Needs a Mobile Strategist | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

 The more I think about marketing in a mobile-centric world like mHealth the more certain I am that...


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US survey finds emergency apps gaining momentum - Boston.com

US survey finds emergency apps gaining momentum - Boston.com | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
(Relaxnews) - In the US, the demand for apps that provide emergency information is growing, at least according to a recent survey from the American Red Cross.
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GE Healthcare, Mylan and Swedish Orphan Biovitrum launch new apps - NEWS - articles - Pharmaceutical Industry - PMLiVE

GE Healthcare, Mylan and Swedish Orphan Biovitrum launch new apps - NEWS - articles - Pharmaceutical Industry - PMLiVE | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

There’s no shortage of mobile apps being produced by pharmaceutical companies and this roundup selects three of the most recent entrants to the market.

First up, and seemingly taking its cue from Google’s erstwhile body browser, GE Healthcare has put 3D interactive models of the human body online.

Produced in partnership with Healthline Networks, the Healthline Body Maps iPad app costs up to £10.49 (just over €13) and is aimed at practicing clinicians and students.

Meanwhile the service is also available via a website, which aims to patients a learning tool for use before, during or after they visit the doctor, with the ultimate goal of helping to improve consumers’ health literacy.

“The more people understand their bodies, the more proactive they become in managing their care and making informed treatment decisions,” the company explained.

The website has male and female version of 28 organs and systems and matches “consumer-friendly anatomical terms with easy-to-read articles.

- - - -

Swedish Orphan Biovitrum has launched an iPhone and iPad app for patients who suffer from the rare genetic condition hereditary angioedema (HAE) to help them record and manage their attacks.

The free HAELP app allows users to log the time and duration of their attacks through a patient diary function and has an interactive map of European HAE centres and information on the condition in 12 European languages.

The company says it is also hard at work developing an Android version of the app.

- - - -

US generic company Mylan has put its printed Generic Brand Reference guide for US healthcare professionals, patients and pharmacy students into app form.

Only available so far for Apple’s iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, the free Mylan GBR Guide app gives brand and generic product names, and offers clinical support tools such as laboratory reference values and an interactive medical abbreviations converter.

• Details of more mobile apps from pharma are available in the Digital Handbook


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How Does EHR Design Affect Implementation and Optimization?

How Does EHR Design Affect Implementation and Optimization? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Every EHR implementation should begin with detailed objectives that specifically address how the organization should be different in terms of clinical outcomes measures (e.g. quality, errors), economic measures (e.g. ROI, revenues, profits), and operational improvements. Absent a list of detailed objectives, it is difficult to tell at any point during the process how well an implementation is proceeding. Of course, this is old news (see Software Runaways and Why Do Healthcare Information Systems Succeed or Fail, two of my favorite introductions to implementation issues).

 

Obviously, software architecture/design also plays a role in how easily EHRs are implemented and used. My recent foray into software design and architecture has helped solidify my understanding of the problems encountered in clinical software design. A surprising idea came to mind while mulling over these issues: Do some aspects of poor software design arise, not from inattentive or inadequate software engineering, but rather from an unchallenged belief that software is complex and implementing it must necessarily be complex as well? Such a mindset presupposes that EHR projects must necessarily require selection committees, project managers, multiple varieties of consultants, and be disruptive.

 

What do you think? Is EHR software (or any major software system) difficult and costly to select and implement because its design and deployment are unavoidably and irreducibly complex OR do EHR designers, assuming the presence of a cadre of consultants, IT personnel, project managers and trainers, (consciously or unconsciously) forego the extra design steps required to make implementation and optimization easier?


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New free iPad medical app shows future of surgical patient education

New free iPad medical app shows future of surgical patient education | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Wrist Repair comes from newcomers Meditech and offers a fascinating insight into the future of surgical patient education apps.

 

Patient education apps are a new developing subset of the medical app industry.

 

Improving patient education is essential to better patient outcomes and overall satisfaction.

 

Wrist Repair is fundamentally a very simple app. Its sole purpose is to show patients the steps required when undergoing Open Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF) of a distal radius fracture.

 

The main essence of the app is a 3D animation, with more. For starters, the animation is a complete 3D model so the patient can move the camera to whatever view they like throughout the procedure.

 

Furthermore, they can select one of three different views:

An impressive 3D reconstruction of the wrist (not 100% anatomically accurate but easily more than sufficient for a patient) in an operating room


A view purely of the bones


An x-ray view (which is very impressive)


The camera can be moved using simple, intuitive touch gestures and zoomed using pinch to zoom.

 


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Health IT: how patients receive educational resources | pharmaphorum

Health IT: how patients receive educational resources | pharmaphorum | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Gena Cook

Navigating Cancer

In our digital focus month, Gena Cook discusses the benefits of Health IT and how it will transform the way patients receive educational resources in the future.

As a result of new federal regulations, the majority of healthcare providers in the US will be required to identify patient-specific education resources utilizing certified electronic health record (EHR) technology, and provide those resources to their patients. While some EHRs will identify patient-specific resources and leave it to the physician to provide paper copies of these resources, best-of-breed systems will go a step further and host digital versions of patient education that can be delivered to patients automatically via their provider’s patient portal. This will present pharma brands with a new and unrivalled opportunity to deliver digital patient education directly to patients via their physician when they are most interested in receiving it.

Regulations overview

The 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) jump-started the US healthcare system to begin a transformative shift from paper to electronic health records. As part of ARRA, the HITECH Act set aside $19 billion in provider incentives to adopt health IT and implement it in a meaningful way to improve care coordination and engage patients and families in their care.

“This will present pharma brands with a new and unrivalled opportunity to deliver digital patient education directly to patients…”

The HITECH Act outlines 25 specific Meaningful Use rules that providers must meet to qualify for the incentives. The objectives are to be implemented in three stages by 2015. In stage one, delivering patient-specific education resources is an optional objective, however in stages two and three it becomes required. The Stage 2 rules were recently finalized, and require that providers give patient-specific education resources identified by certified EHR technology to 10% of all unique patients1. The percentage will likely increase for stage three, but has yet to be finalized.

As of June 2012, over 48% of all eligible hospitals and 1 out of every 5 eligible professionals in the US has adopted a certified EHR system2.

Patients want educational resources to be more engaged in their care

Patients want to be more engaged in their care and are using the Internet to search for health information. In a 2008 study by the Pew Research Center, they found that 83% of Internet users have used the Internet to search for health information, making this activity the third most popular for all online adults3.

In a more recent survey, 77% of cancer patients expressed interest in reading cancer education materials from expert sources online. When asked about specific topics, 73% were interested in learning how to manage treatment side effects, and 66% were interested in learning more about treatment options4.

“Patients want to be more engaged in their care and are using the Internet to search for health information.”

By providing patients with digital copies of educational resources that are specific to their condition, providers can give patients the information they are seeking in a format that is easy for them to share with friends and family. In addition, it can save them time from having to search for this information online, which can lead them to websites with questionable information and authority.

Using Health IT to identify and deliver the right information at the right time

Patient-specific educational resources will be identified by data that is entered into the EHR, including the patient’s problem list (diagnoses), medication list, or lab test results. The EHR isn’t required to store or deliver the resources to the patient, but should suggest resources that are specific to the patient’s condition based on the data stored in the EHR technology.

Most EHRs are designed to be a database for medical records, and have not been designed to communicate with and engage patients in their care, a primary goal of the HITECH Act. To provide patients and staff with a more user-friendly and efficient experience, many healthcare providers are also implementing stand alone patient portals that can be integrated with their EHR and their website. These patient portals act as the user-interface that connects patients to their providers, their own medical records, and educational resources that are specific to their diagnosis.

“Providing patients with personalized educational resources is the first step to empower them to be more engaged in their care.”

Best-of-breed technology will automate the process so patient education can be delivered to patients once a diagnosis or other relevant health information has been entered into the EHR. This eliminates the need for providers to add an additional step to their workflow process, and ensures that patients will receive relevant and trusted educational resources from their provider in a timely manner.

Start planning your Health IT strategy

Health IT is a large part of healthcare reform and plays a central role not only in the HITECH Act, but also in new standards of care being recommended by professional organizations, and in new Accountable Care Organization (ACO) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care models that are being piloted with providers and payers. The common denominator across all these programs is a more coordinated, patient centered approach to care that includes increased patient involvement and engagement. Providing patients with personalized educational resources is the first step to empower them to be more engaged in their care.

Pharma marketers should be thinking about their EHR and broader Health IT strategy and how they can integrate their patient education materials and programs into this new patient education process.

References

1. https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/stage1vsStage2CompTablesforEP.pdf

2. http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2012pres/06/20120619a.html

3. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Generations-2010/Activities/All-age-groups.aspx

4. http://www.navigatingcancer.com/blog/patient-engagement-survey-results/

Previous article by Gena Cook:

• Engaging patients with health IT to improve the healthcare system

About the author:

Gena Cook is Founder and CEO of Navigating Cancer, a leading provider of oncology specific patient portals to some of the largest and most influential oncology practices. She has published guest articles in leading oncology publications and has spoken at national community oncology events.

Gena has over 19 years of healthcare experience, with 17 years directly in the cancer field. She currently serves on the NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) Foundation Board and the Oncology Nursing Society ONS:Edge Board. Previously she served as VP of Sales and Marketing for McKesson Specialty Solutions and Oncology Therapeutics Network (OTN). She can be reached at gena@navigatingcancer.com.

In what ways can digital improve patient engagement?

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Physicians can prescribe medical apps to patients under pilot program

Physicians can prescribe medical apps to patients under pilot program | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Happtique, an online mobile application (app) store for healthcare, has a new e-prescribing solution that enables physicians to prescribe medical, health, and fitness-related apps for their patients.


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mHealth Monthly Mashup: mobile health road map | pharmaphorum

mHealth Monthly Mashup: mobile health road map | pharmaphorum | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Michael Spitz

Zemoga

Michael Spitz of Zemoga continues his mHealth Monthly Mashup series with a step-by-step guide for mobile health success.

Last month we took an “mhealth reality check” and concluded that despite the apparent confusion and contradiction surrounding uptake and adoption, healthcare audiences have embraced mobile health to an extent warranting the term “game changer.”

But skeptics have a valid point in the sense that actual engagement, let alone behavioral change, remains statistically low. Return on investment is also nebulous at best, as few are able to quantify or even justify expensive forays into the mhealth space.

So all hope and hype aside, what does it take to design, develop, and deploy a mobile health experience that actually gets the job done? Instead of simply asking, let’s start answering with the following step-by-step roadmap that could pave the way.

“What does it take to design, develop, and deploy a mobile health experience that actually gets the job done?”

Step 0: Forget about mobile health

Before you even start, stop thinking about mhealth. Seriously. Forget about apps, smartphones, tablets, iTunes, Angry Birds, Happtique, the whole enchilada. The biggest mistake in communications and tech is to leap on a solution before understanding the need.

What’s crucial to acknowledge is that mobile health is merely a tactical recommendation, one channel of many available. You have numerous options, mhealth being just one of them. And at this point, you don’t have enough data to determine if you even want to or should go there.

That’s why it’s important to first understand yourself, your goals, motivation, and capabilities; your audiences and how they use technology; your message and content; and the level of risk acceptable to you. Apps gets built from the outside, in; here’s a way.

“The biggest mistake in communications and tech is to leap on a solution before understanding the need.”

Step 1: Know thyself and never forget the patient

The centerpiece of Greek philosophy is also the prerequisite for digital implementation, especially when considering emerging tech like mobile health. Not kidding: Whether or not your foray into mhealth succeeds is contingent on asking yourself why you’re even trying.

Who are you? Entrepreneur, pharma e-marketer, clinician, or patient advocate? What is your specific goal? Profit, sales, data, or support? Where are your resources? Internal, external, vendor-driven, or academic? When can you start? How extensive is your experience?

Regardless how these personal questions are answered, your overall digital health objective will remain the same: To induce behavioral change in users that engenders positive patient outcomes. Directly or indirectly, in healthcare the patient is your ultimate beneficiary.

That being the case, a mobile health solution might not even make sense. Of the tens of thousands of #healthapps currently available, most are redundant and few genuinely effective. Let’s determine relevance and feasibility, and only then engineer a solution.

Step 2: Know thy audience and remember your stakeholders

Let’s say you’re a pharma e-marketer tasked with the education and empowerment of targets with Drug X data. Whether your audience includes healthcare professionals, patients, caregivers, these segments or others, you must know their distinctive needs and behaviors.

Physicians and specialists, for example, require clinical data such as efficacy, tolerability, administration, side effects and the like to help choose the right treatment option for the right patient; patients, in contrast, may need more info about disease state and support.

A pharma e-marketer must also know how respective segments engage with digital. Sources like Forrester and ComScore reveal touch points. This research helps to put together the optimal “media mix” for Drug X that might – or might not – include a mobile component.

Perhaps equally important are your internal audiences, the stakeholders, decision makers, and influencers within your organization. Getting their buy-in and incorporating their feedback is instrumental to every initiative, especially an edgier one like mobile health.

Step 3: To go mobile or not to go mobile, that is the question

Notice that only after all this soul-searching and due diligence are we finally ready to determine whether or not an mhealth solution is even viable for our goals, audience types, content, and overall intent. Every situation is unique, but this decision comes last, not first.

If the mobile route is actually determined to be appropriate, we’re still not ready to roll. Additional variables also must be weighed, including available budget and resources, estimated timing, and willingness of the organization to take on some risk.

Risk here comes in a few forms: First, return on investment may remain, despite our best efforts, ambiguous and possibly negative. Secondly, mobile is so nascent that pursuing the channel might stretch your organization in terms of capabilities, patience, and bandwidth.

So if at long last, after all these prerequisites have been thought through and checked off, and the decision to proceed with an mhealth solution is made, what next? Now that we can actually get started, how do we help ensure a successful, relatively hassle-free outcome?

Step 4: Begin with the experience in mind

Just as we stopped before we started, now we should end before we begin: Put all technical concerns and considerations aside, shelve every contingency, and imagine what an ideal mobile experience could and should be like for the end user we’ve already come to know.

Every app and mobile-optimized website is different, but the better ones obey established best practices in terms of “user interface” (UI – nuts and bolts of navigation and structure) and “user experience” (UX – holistic effect of all components, including UI, content, visuals).

Your “dream mobile experience” should be the optimal composite between proven design methodology and your own goals, audience, content, and engagement. You want mobile simple and standard enough for all to embrace, but specific enough to meet unique needs.

The result should be a vision with high-level visualizations of what this idealized mobile health experience could be like. With these guiding the project, your teams have what they need to start asking the hard questions, tied back to your resourcing and budget.

“You want mobile simple and standard enough for all to embrace, but specific enough to meet unique needs.”

Step 5: “Git ‘er done!”

The Devil, as they say, is always in the details, nowhere more so than in digital implementation. Not only is the playing field constantly shifting out from under us, iOS to Android to Blackberry to Windows, but the devices themselves are in complete flux.

So an initial key decision is choosing the operating system, dependent again on your goals, audience type, content, etc. But certain generalizations act as guides, such as the iPad currently dominating tablets, and Blackberry, for example, falling to the wayside.

The next decision is device, progressively made all the more complicated because Android systems come in all shapes and sizes, while even the iPad is rumored to be eminently morphing into variants. Mobile websites and apps don’t always scale, so developer beware.

And far as the actual development process goes, much depends on who does the building for you, and how. Important to keep in mind is the need for ongoing strategic involvement and feedback; remember your starting vision, and do your best to keep the train on the tracks.

“The Devil, as they say, is always in the details, nowhere more so than in digital implementation.”

Step 6: Cross your i’s and dot your t’s with compliance

As we know the healthcare space has its indigenous sensitivities, most content delicate, proprietary, often highly private. The space is also heavily regulated, whether the content is branded pharma information, personal patient information, disease state data, or similar.

Being not only mindful but explicitly compliant is therefore not an option but a necessity. Websites and social networks are already fraught with these challenges, and mobile, as a portable extension and integration of both, simply compounds these hotspots.

Experience in pharma and medical device has proven, time and time again, that bringing in the legal and regulatory team as early into the process as possible is most expeditious. Getting their buy-in and consent initially often mitigates bigger problems later.

The US government is the throes of regulating certain kinds of mobile health apps; stay in the know. And for those mhealth projects that steer well clear of these immediate concerns, be mindful that healthcare audiences have different sensitivities and needs than consumers.

Step 7: mhealth as one component of an integrated effort

Perhaps the most important – and most often overlooked – aspect of a successful mhealth initiative is the realization that the end-goal is behavioral modification: The whole initiative is designed to get a healthcare professional, patient, caregiver, clinician to do something.

In contrast, the mobile website or app we’re developing is ultimately just a bunch of digital code. Too often these bundles of software are simply tossed over the fence and out into the world, the builders somehow expecting stickiness and engagement to simply happen.

Without creating a multichannel, full 360-degree, sustainable and emotionally engaging holistic experience, our efforts are doomed to fail. We could build the world’s most astonishing mobile app, but without a human continuum around it, the experience won’t fly.

The “trick to stick” is embedding the mobile website or app within a robust CRM program: Repeating and compelling digital touchpoints on the one hand, and personal, human educational and empowerment components on the other. To make it happen, make it real.

“We could build the world’s most astonishing mobile app, but without a human continuum around it, the experience won’t fly.”

Takeaways

Mobile health can be improved; these few, broadly described steps might provide a bit of clarity. Understanding oneself, goals, audience, content, and tech is important – but enmeshing your mhealth project within a broader human support network is vital.

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Swine flu re-emerges in Orrisa state

Swine flu re-emerges in Orrisa state | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

BHUBANESWAR: The state government on Saturday confirmed Odisha's first swine flu case this year. The H1N1 virus had claimed 32 lives in the state in 2010, when the disease was first reported in...


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mHealth chat tomorrow night on Twitter, special e-Patient edition #PPE

mHealth chat tomorrow night on Twitter, special e-Patient edition #PPE | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A special e-Patient #mHealth tweet chat on September 5th, hosted by iMedicalApps and the Society for Participatory Medicine.


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Smart Glove: "Voice Recognition" for Sign Language Users

Smart Glove: "Voice Recognition" for Sign Language Users | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

An invention called EnableTalk from a crew of Ukranian programmers and designers (named the “QuadSquad”) has the potential to transform the way that sign language speakers communicate with digital devices, as well as the rest of the non-signing population. EnableTalk looks like a high-tech biking glove, equipped with 15 sensors that recognize the gestures of a signers’ hands, send the information to a software program via Bluetooth, and translate the data into sound played though smartphone speakers.


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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.


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Who Is Most Concerned About Mobile Privacy?

Who Is Most Concerned About Mobile Privacy? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
App users worry about how their personal information is used (Of app users, 54% did not install apps b/c they were worried about how it might use their personal info.)...
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The FDA Takes On Mobile Health Apps - IEEE Spectrum

The FDA Takes On Mobile Health Apps - IEEE Spectrum | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Regulation is coming soon to health apps. Here’s what to expect. (The FDA Takes On Mobile Health Apps - IEEE Spectrum: Regulation is coming soon to health apps.
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Should we drop the term e-patient?

Should we drop the term e-patient? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Is the term e-patient outdated and even counter-productive for digital health in 2012? Just as very few people under 25 would use the description  'digital' camera, is there really any other type of patient other than a digital one in digitally advanced demographics?


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 16, 2012 9:43 AM
With due respect to who invented this word "e-patient", it sound so technical. It should never be used when referring to a human being. We have to remember that when we deal on human lives, it is not just about science or technology. It is something which needs the heart.
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Medical bar codes save lives

In Ghana, 40% of all drugs sold are counterfeit. Pioneer Bright Simons has developed a simple and effective way to test the authenticity of medications, taki...
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Using big data to reinvent health care

Using big data to reinvent health care | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
In this analyst roundtable discussion, our experts will discuss how big-data analytics are being applied today to better utilize resources in health care.
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Doximity, a Facebook for doctors, pulls in $17M in funding

Doximity, a Facebook for doctors, pulls in $17M in funding | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Doximity is on a roll! Shortly after announcing that LinkedIn's cofounder had joined its board, the free networking tool for physicians pulled in its second round of venture capital funding.
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‘Diabetes education needs more than screening’

‘Diabetes education needs more than screening’ | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Dubai

The current level of awareness towards diabetes screening isn’t adequate because it doesn’t highlight the risks associated with the condition, said experts during a symposium on diabetes onThursday.

Statistics by the Dubai Health Authority (DHA) peg the percentage of diabetic UAE residents – Emiratis and expatriates, at more than 20 per cent with another 18 at high risk.

Dr Angelyn Bethel, endocrinologist and deputy director of the UK-based Diabetes Trials Unit at the Churchill Hospital, spoke to Gulf News during the symposium that was attended by more than 100 key opinion leaders from the MEA (Middle East and Africa) region.

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She highlighted the need for diabetes education in context of screening, understanding risks, and measures towards better diabetes management.

Dr Bethel, one of the speakers invited by symposium host Julphar, a healthcare company in Ras Al Khaimah that manufactures diabetes products, said, “Patient education is paramount. It isn’t enough to know about the risk of developing diabetes, a patient needs to understand the long-term risks associated with the condition, knowing the risks will help people understand why they should prevent diabetes.”

She stressed the importance of glucose control in mitigating the micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes.

She explained that the micro risks include retinopathy (damage to the retina); nephropathy (kidney disease); and neuropathy (damage to nerves that could result in amputation).

The macro risk includes coronary artery disease and stroke.

“Patients with diabetes are about two to four folds increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to patients without diabetes, even if all the cardiovascular risk factors like blood pressure and lipids are under control. Blood sugar or glucose control is critical to reduce the risk of micro-vascular complication, and in macro, there is a real, but modest benefit as well,” she said.

The diabetes care topics at the symposium also addressed evolving technologies to improve diabetes management. Speaking to Gulf News on the future approaches to diabetes management, Dr Jay S. Skyler, guest speaker, and deputy director for Clinical Research and Academic Programmes at the US-based Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), said that two evolving technologies are insulin delivery and continuous glucose monitoring devices.

“Compared to a year ago, real-time continuous glucose monitoring units are much better, more reliable and accurate. Patients are also gravitating to the new, smaller insulin pumps with touch screen functionality and the syringe-less mechanism that delivers the insulin,” he said.

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New Wireless Sensor Can "Predict the Future" for Fall-Risk Patients

New Wireless Sensor Can "Predict the Future" for Fall-Risk Patients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A new device from Texas Tech University is being developed to predict when a person might fall – even days in advance. It may sound like magic, but the device works by analyzing posture and gait trends and patterns, and sends an alert if there is a break in routine.The device, which is wireless and small enough to be clipped to a belt, works by employing a number of accelerometers and gyroscopes. These sensors measure and build a database of a person’s normal movements, including standing up and sitting down. The data is processed using sophisticated algorithms that identify patterns and will alert the patient to take caution if the pattern is broken.

Texas Tech researchers still have to work out certain issues, such as the optimal location to wear the sensor where it won’t trigger false positives, but the device could be a huge benefit to both the geriatric community and those with balance issues from disorders such as Parkinson’s, epilepsy or dementia.

More info from Texas Tech University: New Technology Could Detect a Fall Before it Happens…

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Predicting how patients respond to therapy

Predicting how patients respond to therapy | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A new study led by MIT neuroscientists has found that brain scans of patients with social anxiety disorder can help predict whether they will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy.

 

Social anxiety is usually treated with either cognitive behavioral therapy or medications. However, it is currently impossible to predict which treatment will work best for a particular patient. The team of researchers from MIT, Boston University (BU) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) found that the effectiveness of therapy could be predicted by measuring patients’ brain activity as they looked at photos of faces, before the therapy sessions began

 

Choosing treatments

 

Sufferers of social anxiety disorder experience intense fear in social situations that interferes with their ability to function in daily life. Cognitive behavioral therapy aims to change the thought and behavior patterns that lead to anxiety. For social anxiety disorder patients, that might include learning to reverse the belief that others are watching or judging them.


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Online Influence Map tool by The Social Moon

Online Influence Map tool by The Social Moon | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The online healthcare environment is vast and complex and it can be a challenge to distil down the large volumes of data available in order to serve up meaningful relationships between key individuals, and organisations. Understanding these relationships can be leveraged to inform and shape any marketing and communications activity. We have developed a custom-tailored tool, built intuitively to allow you to navigate the online environment across any therapy area, to determine who the lead influencers are and to show the connections that exist between them.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
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