Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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3 outstanding private social networks for doctors and patients

3 outstanding private social networks for doctors and patients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

What is a private social network for doctors and patients?
A private social network for doctors and patients uses the best in social applications to enable doctors to educate, provide focused guidance and receive patient feedback on experiences and critical events.


Unlike Facebook or Twitter or standard off-the-shelf forum software, private social network for doctors and patients are designed from the ground up to be private and secure.


Why are private social networks for doctors and patients a good thing?
A private social network for doctors and patients enables a doctor to use patient feedback to take decisions easier and faster, reducing his stress and improving patient’s ability to get better faster.

 

What makes a private social network for doctors and patients private?
A private social network for doctors and patients, is usually based on a star topology, where an individual doctor, team or a front-line caregiver who triages calls to a second level team of specialists; interact with patients and caregivers in a secure and private way. This is sometimes called a “circle of care” of patients and caregivers interacting with their physician or clinical care team.

 

What kind of services do private social networks for doctors and patients provide?
A private social network for doctors and patients typically provides 3 core services – search, private messaging and secure data storage of PHR (personal health record).

 

So – what’s the big deal, why are private social networks for doctors and patients any different than a patient portal?
It’s totally a question of focus and a philosphy of who drives the healthcare process.

 

Healthcare provider portals take information and enable patients to access it, sometimes to even store PHR. The focus is on the healthcare provider organization repurposing information they already heave.

 

Private social networks for doctors and patients are driven by physicians under the belief that doctors not organizations drive the healthcare process.

 

The primary mission of a private social network for doctors and patients is to help doctors better serve existing patients, find new ones and build their reputations by demonstrating their expertise online." (...)

 

CE: see rest of article for a discussion on HealthTap, DoctorsElite and Wellahu.

 


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Does home telemonitoring improve patient outcomes?

Does home telemonitoring improve patient outcomes? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A landmark study was conducted to explore the potential of home telemonitoring as part of long-term care solutions.

 

The study revealed that 15% of telegroup patients were hospitalised, with 0 deaths, against the 33% rate of death or hospitalisation for the control group. The relative risk reduction of 54% is certainly a promising result. Additionally, the telegroup patients who were hospitalised had a significantly shorter length of stay (median 6.5 days) compared to the control group (median 10 days). The CHF patients were also compliant with using the mobile phones for telecare, with a great adherance rate of 95%.


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IT in Modern Healthcare Organisations | eHEALTH Magazine

IT in Modern Healthcare Organisations | eHEALTH Magazine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
IT in Modern Healthcare Organisations http://t.co/M2koz4Tp #healthcare #IT...
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The future of health data analytics remains up for debate - TechTarget

The future of health data analytics remains up for debateTechTargetMost health care professionals would agree that health data analytics has a role to play in making care safer and more affordable.

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Mayo study proves value of smartphones in stroke treatment | mHIMSS

Mayo study proves value of smartphones in stroke treatment | mHIMSS | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Mayo study proves value of smartphones in stroke treatment http://t.co/cMuMhkY2 #hcsmeu #mhealth...


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Learning to love e-health

Learning to love e-health | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Doctors love paper. Just think about it — we use paper hospital notes, send each other printed or even hand-written letters, use paper radiology and lab forms, write or print our scripts, and we worship the voluminous textbooks on our shelves.

 

The good old fax machine, introduced in the 1970s, was much more successful in winning over health care professionals than e-health has been. At the same time we feel the paper-dominated health care ecosphere is not very efficient, to say the least.

 

Many of us own a smartphone, tablet device or laptop and we love it. We make our devices sync with work email and agendas or other software. We may have a few cool apps. And about one in 10 Australian doctors is even using social media to connect with patients and other health professionals.But in our day-to-day work, many of us rely heavily on paper and the fax machine. How do we change this?

 

In an innovative blog post titled “We have to wean doctors off paper. But how?” a group of Silicon Valley designers explained how to make software for doctors more user-friendly.

 

To successfully design clinical software that competes with pen and paper, the authors mention three key factors — ease of use, flexibility and simplicity.

 

“If an [electronic health record] isn’t easy to adopt, doctors will quickly get frustrated and return to familiar paper. If it isn’t flexible, it will be impractical for many specialties and doctors with unique workflows”, the designers wrote.

 

In other words, medical software should be just as easy to use as paper.

 

Quick access to the clinical data is important. Long boot up times and multiple screens to click through should be avoided. Buttons and screens should be placed intuitively to reduce mouse movements and clicks.

 

But even if these three key factors are met, there’s still something missing.

 

Health care providers increasingly need immediate access to data. We’re connected 24/7 to networks and use so many different electronic applications to access all sorts of data sources, that it sometimes feels like it’s all too much.

 

How easy would it be if all the different tools were integrated in one software package?

 

The fourth requirement is integration of applications.

 

Imagine this: You’re sitting behind a large wide screen at work (see image below). If you click on the screen it responds immediately; the system is fast. The home screen provides online access to all the health providers in your direct network, including GP practices, specialists, hospitals, and allied health professionals at different locations.

 

You can see who is online and who isn’t. Your incoming email and agenda sit in the right top corner, and in the bottom of the screen are your social networks of choice and a video consultation tool.Included in the package would be professional resources like electronic therapeutic guidelines, secure enterprise social networks and encrypted video consultation tools. Smart phone and tablet apps would be available to improve ease of access.

 

With two clicks of the mouse you can select and upload data from your clinical management software to the secure health network. Other health professionals can immediately read and comment on problems and questions. You can have a videoconference with colleagues while the patient data is still visible on the same screen.


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How Big Data Is Improving Healthcare

How Big Data Is Improving Healthcare | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
With the increasing digitization of healthcare, the trend of "Big Data" has been gathering steam. According to a new report from digital health consultancy DrBonnie360, there is an estimated 50 petabytes of data in the healthcare realm.

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identify patients within a population who are at risk for becoming non-adherent and then recommends the most appropriate interventions

identify patients within a population who are at risk for becoming non-adherent and then recommends the most appropriate interventions | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

It's one of healthcare's great mysteries: How the heck do we get patients to take their medicines?

We're offering them cash rewards, giving them high-tech pill dispensers, and sending them mobile reminders. Soon we'll even be feeding them smart pills. But RxAnte is built on the idea that we should step back for a minute and do some analyzing.

The startup isn't trying to create interventions for medication adherence; rather, it's trying to help clinicians, payers, and pharmaceutical companies know which patients will be noncompliant and which interventions would be most likely to help them, according to CEO Josh Benner.

"The big mystery is not that we don't know how to improve adherence – this big body of science is pretty clear that providers can improve adherence by talking to patients at the right time and counseling them," he said. "But there are work flow and economic barriers to doing that."

RxAnte's proprietary analytics platform uses data to identify patients within a population who are at risk for becoming non-adherent and then recommends the most appropriate interventions for those specific patients. It also tracks adherence over time, eventually allowing providers, payers, benefit managers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers to compare the effectiveness and ROI of different adherence interventions.

The company has just rounded up a $4.6 million series A from Aberdare Ventures and West Health Investment Fund, which it says it will use to expand the commercialization of its services and build on to them.

"It's an exciting time, because medication adherence is being adopted as a quality measure," Benner said. The first place that's happened is in Medicare, and with that in mind, the company plans to expand its services to Medicare health plans, with the hope of helping those clients improve their star ratings.

The lack of medication adherence is estimated to cost the U.S. $290 billion in healthcare costs annually, according to one estimate from the New England Healthcare Institute. Research over the years has tested dozens of factors that may influence a patient's likeliness to comply with medication plans, from age and gender to beliefs about medication and health literacy.

RxAnte's analysis uses existing clinical and administrative data – so, more of age and gender-type factors and less personality traits – to tell providers and payers which patients to target.

Great idea, right?

Right, which is why FICO, a Minneapolis company known for its credit scoring, developed a similar proprietary medication adherence scoring system that it rolled out last year. This year, Express Scripts followed suit with its ScreenRx predictive analytics.

But the market opportunity for this kind of product is continuing to grow, according to Benner. "I think we will see more adoption of adherence in other quality measurements and pay-for-performance scenarios over time," he added. "That's likely to happen in Medicaid and community health plans as well, and providers are going to be held increasingly accountable."

Benner is the former managing director at the Brookings Institution's Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform and a former principal at ValueMedics Research. Several members of the RxAnte leadership team also come from ValueMedics, IMS Health (which bought ValueMedics), and the Brookings Institute.

Founded as Crimson Health LLC in 2008, the company became RxAnte when it brought the product to market in the fall. It's stationed outside of Washington, D.C., in McLean, Virginia.


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The doctors are in at IBM Research

The doctors are in at IBM Research | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

IBM Research (@IBMResearch) may be best known for its scientists who have created technology breakthroughs from moving atoms to analytics systems like IBM Watson. But what might surprise many is the number of deep subject matter experts now working side-by-side with computer scientists to redefine how industries apply technology to improve the services they offer.


The world's healthcare systems, for example, are aging and increasingly complex. Despite amazing advances in medicine and patient care, the system is still plagued by misdiagnosis, misaligned incentives that increase cost, and lack of access to the latest information on patient medical history and treatment options.


Today, a team of medical doctors with more than a century of combined experience is working inside IBM Research with scientists from a variety of disciplines. They are examining ways to improve the healthcare system from all angles - from using data analytics for better-informed diagnoses to understanding why certain diseases flourish in some regions of the world but not others. Perhaps most importantly, they are helping researchers deepen their understanding of the industry, in order to apply technology more effectively.

In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that up to 20 percent of diagnoses are either incorrect or incomplete. In addition, there are an estimated 1.5 million errors in the way medications are prescribed, delivered and taken in the U.S. every year.


These mistakes could be greatly reduced if doctors had access to the latest relevant medical information. But there is so much medical data in the world that it is impossible to keep track of it all.


The MDs are now working with researchers to apply IBM Watson's capabilities to answer natural language queries - which it first demonstrate by defeating the world's best human contestants on the quiz show Jeopardy! - to search through tremendous amounts of both structured and unstructured medical data, from journals to CAT scans, to provide practitioners with vital information.

 

"Watson will leverage existing evidence in new ways," said Josko Silobrcic, MD, Senior Medical Scientist at IBM Research, "and with natural language processing and machine learning, it may uncover new patterns that may not have been recognized before."


Martin Kohn, MD, Chief Medical Scientist for Care Delivery Systems at IBM Research, is helping design Watson's capabilities in a manner that best supports the way clinicians work. He said physicians tell him, "I'm looking for something to bring help to me when I need it, in a format that is useful."


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Bill would create FDA Office of Mobile Health, HHS support for app developers | mobihealthnews

Bill would create FDA Office of Mobile Health, HHS support for app developers | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Though the Food and Drug Administration is developing regulations for mobile medical apps, at least one member of Congress believes the federal agency is not currently equipped to handle the rapid pace of innovation in mobile technology.Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.), whose district covers much of Silicon Valley, is preparing to introduce legislation that would address this perceived shortcoming by establishing an Office of Mobile Health within the FDA. The office, according to Kaiser Health News, would make recommendations to FDA regulators on issues related to mobile health apps.

The planned legislation, reportedly known as the Healthcare Innovation and Marketplace Technologies Act (HIMTA), also would set up a support program within the Department of Health and Human Services to help mobile health technology developers follow HIPAA privacy standards as they design new apps.

“Currently, our healthcare system works against small-to-large startup entrepreneurs with a multitude of barriers to entry,” Honda says in a statement. “Why have the principles of Silicon Valley, which I represent – competition, innovation, and entrepreneurship – not fully manifested themselves in the healthcare information technology space? This bill gets us closer to that space.”

Predictably, in this divided political climate, opinions of the forthcoming bill are mixed.

Andrew Rosenthal, chief strategy officer for Massive Health, a startup developer of consumer health apps, tells Kaiser Health News that he is hopeful an FDA Office of Mobile Health could help smaller companies like his navigate the “confusing” and often expensive regulatory process. However, Joel White, executive director of the Health IT Now Coalition, a group of major corporations and the conservative U.S. Chamber of Commerce, would prefer a new agency that works outside the bureaucratic FDA framework so as not to discourage innovation.

Kaiser Health News reports that the bill would be introduced “later this month,” though September ends Sunday. As of Thursday afternoon, no bill had been introduced. Honda’s media spokesman was not immediately available for comment.

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Pedi QuikCalc app is true to its name, a quick and easy medical calculator for pediatricians

Pedi QuikCalc app is true to its name, a quick and easy medical calculator for pediatricians | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
This is a review of the Pedi QuikCalc app, a medical calculator and reference app for physicians treating pediatric patients.
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National Cancer Institute develops mobile web app to serve patients

National Cancer Institute develops mobile web app to serve patients | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Jonathan Cho from the National Cancer Institute demonstrated the development process behind creating the NCI recently released mobile web app...

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How doctors' use of mobile technology impacts telehealth - infographic and insights

How doctors' use of mobile technology impacts telehealth - infographic and insights | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Telehealth is increasingly intertwined with mobile health.
Use of mobile devices is on the rise by healthcare consumers and providers alike.


Demand for mobile access to healthcare increases as the healthcare ecosystem shifts towards a model where care comes to the patient rather than the patient going to where care can be delivered.


Supply of mobile healthcare solutions is skyrocketing, with over 13,000 medical and healthcare apps available already, and traditional software-based telehealth solutions adding mobile access to their platforms.


A key part of the mobile healthcare world is the doctor.

 

Telehealth and Mobile apps

 

55% of physicians are using mobile apps

 

But don’t let the stat fool you into thinking that it’s all clinical. While doctors will use clinical apps such as Epocrates, they are just like other people in that they are common users of apps like Facebook, ESPN, and the Weather Channel.

 

It’s actually even more critical that doctors are using these devices for socialization, entertainment, and non-clinical information. It means they are comfortable with the devices.

 

Utilization is a key driver of telehealth adoption.

 

So if users are at least comfortable with the technology you that enables their telehealth activities, you have a higher chance of the solution being utilized.

 

Of course, it follows that a bad app on an easy-to-use device is not going to last very long and could easily be replaced if a substitute is available.

 

So if you’re going to have one of the few apps that the doctor relies on in their daily routine, you must make it user-friendly and clinically sound.


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Apps Alert the Doctor When Trouble Looms

Apps Alert the Doctor When Trouble Looms | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
New technology uses standard features on smartphones - GPS and movement tracking - to monitor a patient's behavior and alert the doctor when something seems out of order.

 

"For many patients with chronic medical conditions like depression, pain or diabetes, the pattern is predictable: The more they suffer, the more they draw inward. Doctors may not see them until they are in crisis and show up in an emergency room.

 

Now a digital-era solution is emerging. When patients withdraw, their cellphones may reach out for them. The phones use an app that tracks how often they send text messages and place calls, and how often they move and where they go. If their habits and patterns deviate in a way that suggests they’ve become withdrawn, the app alerts a doctor or other caregiver to check in.

 

A handful of hospitals and medical centers have recently begun testing and using the technology, with financial backing for these digital flares coming from medical chains, the United States military and insurance companies.

 

The novel approach relies on technology that is increasingly standard on smartphones: global positioning systems and accelerometers that can track location and movement." (...)


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Frederik K. O. Kristensen's comment, October 10, 2012 5:42 AM
In single payor countries this possibility has to be balanced against the "big brother"challenge!
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Despite Some Doom & Gloom, The Future For Healthtech (And Health Investing) Is Bright | TechCrunch | @scoopit http://sco.lt/...

Despite Some Doom & Gloom, The Future For Healthtech (And Health Investing) Is Bright | TechCrunch | @scoopit http://sco.lt/... | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
As digital health data grows, wearable health-tracking devices mature, tools used in remote diagnosis and treatment improve and with healthcare providers soon to be prescribing mobile health apps, there's a lot to be excited about at the...
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Physicians’ Love of iPads: Opportunities for Pharma Reps

Physicians’ Love of iPads: Opportunities for Pharma Reps | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
See research performed by MD Mindset on iPad ownership, professional use and pharmaceutical rep use in physician detailing.

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Online treatment for depression reduce suicide risks

Online treatment for depression reduce suicide risks | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Web-based treatment for people with depression cuts by half the number of people with the illness contemplating suicide, Australian research shows.


The research, published in the British Medical Journal Open, shows a dramatic reduction in both depression and suicidal thoughts in patients who participated in the study involving internet cognitive behaviour therapy.


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How To Speak Doctor - become an active, informed patient with our insider's guide

How To Speak Doctor - become an active, informed patient with our insider's guide | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
patient guide how to speak doctor medical communication online course learning wellness human resources...

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Physician-Patient Communication by the Numbers

Physician-Patient Communication by the Numbers | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Infographic of Physician-Patient Communication by the Numbers... but which country ?? Assume US...


Via Olivier Delannoy, Agathe Quignot, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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Tutorial shows physicians how to set up their iPad for medical use | Doctor

Tutorial shows physicians how to set up their iPad for medical use | Doctor | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
One of the most popular mobile devices amongst physicians is the iPad due to its powerful feature set combined with a great form factor.
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81% of American physicians have adopted smart phones according to Manhattan Research #mhealth

81% of American physicians have adopted smart phones according to Manhattan Research #mhealth | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

81% of American physicians have adopted smart phones according to Manhattan Research http://t.co/uvKKqgzR :: #hcsm #hcmktg...


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Why Tablets Are The Future Of Electronic Medical Records [REPORT]

Why Tablets Are The Future Of Electronic Medical Records [REPORT] | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) by doctor practices and hospitals is one of the most exciting developments in health - and the iPad is playing a big part.

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Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information

Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT
Background: Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning.
Objective: To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians’ use of social media as a component of their lifelong learning and continuing professional development.
Methods: We developed a survey instrument based on the Technology Acceptance Model, hypothesizing that technology usage is best predicted by a physician’s attitudes toward the technology, perceptions about the technology’s usefulness and ease of use, and individual factors such as personal innovativeness. The survey was distributed via email to a random sample of 1695 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians in the United States in March 2011. Responses from 485 physicians were analyzed (response rate 28.61%).
Results: Overall, 117 of 485 (24.1%) of respondents used social media daily or many times daily to scan or explore medical information, whereas 69 of 485 (14.2%) contributed new information via social media on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 of 485 (61.0%) scanned and 223 of 485 (46.0%) contributed. In terms of attitudes toward the use of social media, 279 of 485 respondents (57.5%) perceived social media to be beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information. In terms of usefulness, 281 of 485 (57.9%) of respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 291 of 485 (60.0%) stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. The main factors influencing a physician’s usage of social media to share medical knowledge with other physicians were perceived ease of use and usefulness. Respondents who had positive attitudes toward the use of social media were more likely to use social media and to share medical information with other physicians through social media. Neither age nor gender had a significant impact on adoption or usage of social media.
Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, the use of social media applications may be seen as an efficient and effective method for physicians to keep up-to-date and to share newly acquired medical knowledge with other physicians within the medical community and to improve the quality of patient care. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the meaningful use of social media on physicians’ knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors in practice.


(J Med Internet Res 2012;14(5):e117)
doi:10.2196/jmir.2138

KEYWORDS

Social media; continuing medical education; physicians and social media; physician-physician relationship; oncologists; primary care physicians; education technology; physicians' practice patterns


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Innovation Working Group and mHealth Alliance Announce 2012 Grant Winners

Innovation Working Group and mHealth Alliance Announce 2012 Grant Winners | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The United Nations Foundation connects the UN’s work with supporters around the world, mobilizing engaged global citizens, businesses, and non-governmental organizations to help the UN tackle issues.
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How Smartphones Are Changing Health Care [INFOGRAPHIC]

How Smartphones Are Changing Health Care [INFOGRAPHIC] | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Smartphones aren't just hard on eyes and posture -- they can also help lead to better health.

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