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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Allies for Health: Modern Medicine: Technology Will Advance, But Human Connection Remains

Allies for Health: Modern Medicine: Technology Will Advance, But Human Connection Remains | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Technology Will Advance, But Human Connection Remains http://t.co/pDlePgb1...
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TelecomTV | News | Can mHealth reduce the 61% of deaths caused by NCDs?

TelecomTV | News | Can mHealth reduce the 61% of deaths caused by NCDs? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
“We need to avoid regulating for the status quo and to allow innovators" http://t.co/4CrB2Tk1...
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a new technology offering that provides the ability for all sorts of medical sensors to easily use smartphones and tablets as their interface.

LionsGate Technologies of Vancouver, Canada has announced a new technology offering that provides the ability for all sorts of medical sensors to easily use smartphones and tablets as their interface. By using the audio jack as the cheap and universal way to transfer data, LionsGate can make their technology compatible with just about any programmable consumer device out there.

They’ve already demonstrated their Vital Signs DSP technology by building a pulse oximeter that works straight off an iPhone’s audio jack and displays readings on its screen. This technology gives companies the ability to focus on the core technology they’re working on, either during development or for actual production of a cheap medical device that doesn’t need its own display.


Via Chaturika Jayadewa, Bart Collet, Camilo Erazo, Jim Murphy
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Cleveland Clinic, IBM to send Watson to medical school | Healthcare IT News

Cleveland Clinic, IBM to send Watson to medical school | Healthcare IT News | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

CLEVELAND – Cleveland Clinic and IBM are partnering to increase the use of the Watson supercomputer in medical training. IBM researchers will work with Cleveland Clinic faculty and students to enhance Watson's Deep Question Answering technology for medicine.

 

IBM officials say Watson's ability to analyze the meaning and context of human language – and quickly process information to piece together evidence for answers – can help clinicians, nurses and medical students uncover knowledge buried within huge volumes of information.

 

The past few years have seen Watson gaining knowledge in the field of medicine, they add, and so Cleveland Clinic has recognized the opportunity for Watson to interact with medical students as they themselves learn the ropes.

 

"Every day, physicians and scientists around the world add more and more information to what I think of as an ever-expanding, global medical library," said C. Martin Harris, MD, chief information officer of Cleveland Clinic.

 

"Cleveland Clinic's collaboration with IBM is exciting because it offers us the opportunity to teach Watson to 'think' in ways that have the potential to make it a powerful tool in medicine," he added.

 

"Technology like this can allow us to leverage that medical library to help train our students and also find new ways to address the public health challenges we face today."

 

One of those challenges is to cope with vast and ever-growing troves of medical knowledge. Even if a student were to memorize whole text books and medical journals, there are always new advances to learn.

It's best for students to learn through doing, Cleveland Clinic officials point out – such as by taking patient case studies, analyzing them, coming up with hypotheses and then finding and connecting evidence in reference materials to identify diagnoses and treatment options.

 

That's where Watson, with his ability to process huge amounts of data and sniff out evidence-based solutions, comes in. Students at Cleveland Clinic will interact with Watson on challenging cases as part of a problem-based learning curriculum and in hypothetical clinical simulations, officials say.

 

Watson technology will be made available to help students learn the process of navigating the latest content, suggesting and considering a variety of hypotheses, and finding key evidence to support potential answers, diagnoses and possible treatment options.

 

In turn, those students will help fine tune Watson's language and domain analysis capabilities by judging the evidence it provides and analyzing its answers.

 

This collaboration will also focus on leveraging Watson to process an electronic medical record (EMR) based on a deep semantic understanding of the content within an EMR, officials say.

 

"The practice of medicine is changing and so should the way medical students learn," said David Ferrucci, IBM fellow and the principal investigator of the Watson project. "In the real world, medical case scenarios should rely on people's ability to quickly find and apply the most relevant knowledge. Finding and evaluating multistep paths through the medical literature is required to identify evidence in support of potential diagnoses and treatment options."

 

"New discoveries and medical breakthroughs are growing our collective knowledge of medicine at an unprecedented pace, and tomorrow's doctors will have to embrace new tools and technology to complement their own knowledge and experience in the field," added James Stoller, MD, chair of the Education Institute at Cleveland Clinic. "Technology will never replace the doctor, but it can make us better. Our students and faculty are excited to play a role in getting us there."


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Guardian Angels, a smart Sensors European initiative

Guardian Angels, a smart Sensors European initiative | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Guardian Angels is one of the 6 project pilots that EU has been funding for one year. Beginning of 2013, at least 2 of them will be selected and funded for a 10 years initiative program (1 billion €).

Led by the "Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne" (CH), Guardian Angels project aims at developping smart autonomous devices in a triple range : physical, environmental and emotionnal.


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Feasibility of a Wiki as a Participatory Tool for Patients in Clinical Guideline Development

Feasibility of a Wiki as a Participatory Tool for Patients in Clinical Guideline Development | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Feasibility of a Wiki as a Participatory Tool for Patients in Clinical Guideline Development...

 

What is realy interesting in this "scientific journal" is that Pharma is not part of the discussion. This should trigger some discussion from our side - should we be at the table? From my point of view the drugs are part of the solution, and we'd be cleaver to listen and contribute, and even possibly trigger changes from our side of how we can help provide solutions for patients and other stakeholders.

 

Conclusion: The wiki is a promising and feasible participatory tool for patients in guideline development. A modified version of this tool including new modalities (eg, automatically limiting the number and length of recommendations, using a fixed format for recommendations, including a motivation page, and adding a continuous prioritization system) should be developed and evaluated in a patient-centered design.

 


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Why physicians will prefer an iPad mini: It’s pocketable | mobihealthnews

Why physicians will prefer an iPad mini: It’s pocketable | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The iPad mini, which is priced at as low as $329, is “as thin as a pencil”, according to Apple. Physicians, however, are likely more interested in the device’s other two dimensions: Since the iPad mini is 7.87 inches tall by 5.3 inches wide, it is the first iPad that can fit into the standard lab coat pocket. Those typically measure about 8.5 inches by 7.5 inches.About one third of physicians that Epocrates polled leading up to Apple’s big announcement earlier this week said they planned to buy the device if it turned out to be a real product. Epocrates’ survey took place when the iPad mini was still just a (very, very widely spread) rumor, but at the time 90 percent of those physicians who told Epocrates they were interested in buying it said that the smaller size was their main motivation because it would be easier to carry it around with them on rounds.

In an interview with the Washington Post this week, Forrester technology analyst Sarah Rotman Epps also noted that the device would likely prove popular for healthcare providers: “In the medical industry – carrying around full-sized iPads isn’t that practical,” she said. “A smaller, lighter device expands the number of people who can use the device regularly.”

In May of this year, Manhattan Research announced that based on its survey of physicians in the US some 62 percent were already using a tablet of some kind. Most of them were iPad users at the time, according to the research firm. About half said they used tablets at the point of care. The year before — in May 2011 – the company published results from a similar survey that found about 30 percent of physicians in the US used iPads to access EHRs, view radiology images, and communicate with patients at that time.

By all accounts the iPad has dominated tablets in the physician market these past few years, and if recent surveys are to be believed, the smaller iPad mini may win over some hold outs, too. Still, at half the screen size, just 7.9 inches, and the resolution of the iPad 2 (no retina display like iPad 3 and 4), the iPad mini may find different use cases at the point of care than its predecessors or its smaller cousin the iPhone.

Preorders for the iPad mini start this Friday, October 26th, and it will hit store shelves and start shipping next Friday, November 2nd.

In other news: MobiHealthNews has just published a free report, called Healthy Feedback Loops, that includes a number of examples of different ways that consumer health companies are using various incentives to encourage users to make healthier decisions. It’s a worthwhile review for longtime MobiHealthNews readers, but also a great introductory report for those who recently joined the digital health fray. Download your complimentary copy right here!

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IHS unveils new personal health record (PHR) system

IHS unveils new personal health record (PHR) system | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Patient health records (PHRs) are coming soon to patients in the Indian Health System (IHS), according to a new system of records notice (SORN) in appearing Oct. 29 on the Federal Registrar. Beginning Dec. 13, 2012, IHS patients will have web access to a portion of their personal medical information contained in the IHS Medical, Health, and Billing Records system. “The IHS PHR system will contain administrative records needed to manage patients’ web access; initially, patients will be granted access to view and print portions of their official IHS electronic health record (EHR) via the Internet,” states the IHS notice.


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IBM - Mobile Health Technology: Changing the Face of Healthcare - Healthcare Industry - Blog

IBM - Mobile Health Technology: Changing the Face of Healthcare - Healthcare Industry - Blog | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Unnecessary tests and procedures and preventable medical errors wreak havoc through not only rising costs, but patient mortality. The cure? A smarter healthcare system to increase efficiency, achieve better quality outcomes and save more lives.
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Convince Your mHealth Brand to Go Mobile with these 4 Statistics

Convince Your mHealth Brand to Go Mobile with these 4 Statistics | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
What if 90 percent of your mHealth company’s marketing emails resulted in your prospect’s action in one day? I am semi-quoting from a recent blog...

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Elderly still not using apps for health, but tomorrow’s seniors might | mobihealthnews

Elderly still not using apps for health, but tomorrow’s seniors might | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

s baby boomers age, many are taking greater control over their own healthcare than any generation before them, and mobile technology is be a big part of that movement. But today’s elderly might not be interested in gadgets and apps.

 

“Seniors aren’t using apps for health,” healthcare technology consultant and futurist Mary Cain, managing director of San Francisco-based HT3, said at last week’s Health 2.0 Conference in that same city. In fact, that’s pretty much how Cain led off a session she moderated on digital tools for healthy aging, in case any of the many startup companies and venture capitalists in attendance had any wrong ideas.


Via Richard Meyer, Agathe Quignot
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Bosch, UK university launch digital health lab | mobihealthnews

Bosch, UK university launch digital health lab | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

A British university is joining the growing roster of organizations formally researching the effectiveness of digital healthcare technologies and brainstorming further innovations.

The Institute of Digital Healthcare (IDH) at the University of Warwick in England is teaming with the university’s WMG innovation center and Bosch Healthcare to create the IDH Learning Lab. Also participating is Britain’s National Health Service Midlands and East Region. The parties did not disclose how much money they are dedicating to the lab


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Health Blogging: An Examination of the Outcomes Associated With Making Public, Written Disclosures About Health

An Examination of the Outcomes Associated With Health Blogging (HT @ElinSilveous) | http://t.co/J7wKxeZO...
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Early Bird for mHealth: Mobiles for Public Health Online Course Ends Today! - Peace and Collaborative Development Network

Early Bird for mHealth: Mobiles for Public Health Online Course Ends Today! - Peace and Collaborative Development Network | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Cross-posted from TechChange Online Course, mHealth: Mobile Phones for Public Health   Course Title: mHealth: Mobile Phones for Public Health Course Descriptio… (Early Bird for mHealth: Mobiles for Public Health Online Course ...: Cross-posted from...
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The future of mobile management will be away from the device and more about applications

The future of mobile management will be away from the device and more about applications | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The next stage of mobile management will less about devices and more of a move to application security.

Speaking to SC Magazine, MobileIron CEO Bob Tinker said that the mobile control market is changing to enable users to choose and access email and applications in a secure way.

He said that the first phase was how to enable device choice, from the perspective of an IT manager, and that is where mobile device management (MDM) came in. The next is now about how to enable mobile applications and content, establishing the content of 'mobile IT'. “This is about how to enable applications and the content inside, it is not just MDM, it is turning into a bigger market,” he said.

“We believe in mobile application management; that is the next generation of mobile IT where access is to email and devices to enable application access and content. Applications that change a business to make your life easier. With mobile content, the biggest thing is access to applications and content.”

Tinker said that he could see a big shake-up of the market as many vendors are entering the MDM market without the capability to offer secure access to applications. “Our technology is so dynamic that it is really about moving to the security of the application. To be successful in mobile you need to focus on mobile, as many are struggling to keep up,” he said.

Alan Giles, managing director EMEA at Fiberlink, told SC Magazine that the concept of bring your own device (BYOD) doesn't have to be about providing for big business as small and medium enterprises are also opting into the policy.

He said: “A 'containerised' approach will not work as it affects the user experience. If you take that away, the policy does not work so you want more of a lighter touch so the user can use the device as they want to but have secure access to corporate assets. However the IT manager needs to be safe in the knowledge that it is done securely.

“Most vendors in the space are still growing, but we see more maturity in policy setting. Everyone knows that you can save money with BYOD and it is convenient, but companies are getting away from saving money as the driver to moving from it being a capital expenditure to an operational expenditure.”

Asked if he felt that MDM was 'last year's technology', Giles said it was in terms of blocking and wiping, but a year ago application management took off for Fiberlink as it was about being security-centric. “Half of our business is application management so the corporate can decide what they allow from what is bought in-house and what is developed by a third party,” he said.

“The distribution of apps is based on access right and need, and you can build a profile based on what goes where and how. On a personal device you cannot say 'you cannot use Angry Birds' but on a corporate device you can. You need to separate consumer from professional applications.”

Analyst Alan Goode said that he had never been a fan of MDM, but felt that this was a maturing market as the wave of devices coming into the workplace continued. “We are getting reports of C-level executives and down wanting mobile management and wanting to use their own device,” he said.

“We see instances with a sandbox for access to email and corporate applications in a silo and you authenticate into it, then the user experience is very poor. Do users like a client on their own device? Probably not. The market is maturing as it is another tool and a burden. We will see MAM coming more from vendors to improve the user interface to fix the inadequacies of MDM, and I think we will see that going into the platform.

“Application management makes sense as it is understanding mobility and it will improve the development of applications in the lifecycle and how code is tested.”

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Turning the smartphone from a telephone into a tricorder | ExtremeTech | E-Pochindriac

Turning the smartphone from a telephone into a tricorder | ExtremeTech | E-Pochindriac | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The rapid adoption of iPhone and Android smartphones to track medical health is nothing short of revolutionary.


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Davita Launches Collaborative Community, NephLink, for Kidney Care Physicians | Ozmosis

Davita Launches Collaborative Community, NephLink, for Kidney Care Physicians | Ozmosis | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The Ozmosis team is delighted to announce that DaVita Inc. (DVA), a leading provider of kidney care services that is committed to improving the quality of life for those diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD), has launched NephLink, a new online physician community for kidney care (powered by the OzmosisESP platform.)

 

NephLink is a prime example of how Ozmosis is powering a new model of collaborative care in the mobile and social age. On NephLink, registered and verified physicians can engage with their colleagues virtually to collaborate around challenging clinical cases and practice management issues in a private and secure community. In addition to providing tools to connect and collaborate, NephLink provides access to news, journals, events and resources from leading kidney care news syndicates and journal publishers.


Via Joel Selzer
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FDA's "Mobile Medical Apps" Scope of Oversight Pyramid: Confusion Abounds

FDA's "Mobile Medical Apps" Scope of Oversight Pyramid: Confusion Abounds | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

FDA has reserved the term "Mobile Medical App" (MMA) to mean a medical app that meets its medical "device" definition. From now on I will have to be careful NOT to use that term/phrase when talking about mobile apps that clearly are NOT medical devices. I guess we should use "Mobile Health Apps" instead.


Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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C8 Non-Invasive Optical Glucose Monitor System Cleared for Sale in Europe

C8 Non-Invasive Optical Glucose Monitor System Cleared for Sale in Europe | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

C8 MediSensors, a San Jose, California company, maybe making a bit of history by receiving the European CE Mark for their Optical Glucose Monitor System.


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Mobile Health Around the Globe: FaceTalk Makes Patients Partners | HealthWorks Collective

Mobile Health Around the Globe: FaceTalk Makes Patients Partners | HealthWorks Collective | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
For an increasing number of patients, it is difficult to make an appointment with a doctor or other healthcare provider. This is due to a patient's decreased mobility or lack of time. The eHealth application FaceTalk provides the solution.

Via Sam Stern
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HIMSS Emerging Professionals Going Strong | Healthcare IT News

HIMSS Emerging Professionals Going Strong - Healthcare IT News (blog) http://t.co/C3k5aaFU...
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11 apps to promote healthy lifestyles among employees

11 apps to promote healthy lifestyles among employees | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
These days, there’s an app for everything small-business related, from easing the pains of payroll to holding virtual meetings with contractors on the other side of the world. And there’s also an app for everything when it comes to personal productivity, helping people keep efficient to-do lists and staying on top of their family matters.

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Big Data Gets Personal as Healthcare and Life Sciences Converge

Big Data Gets Personal as Healthcare and Life Sciences Converge | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Sometime in the next few years, for $1,000 or less, you’ll be able to have your entire personal genome sequenced, and the relevant genomic and medical data will fit on a thumb drive.

That will represent a remarkable advance in the march toward truly personalized medicine—but it’s also just the beginning of an even larger story.

A series of breakthroughs in medical science and information technology are triggering a convergence between the healthcare industry and the life-sciences industry, a convergence that will quickly lead to more intimate—and interactive—relationships among people, their doctors, and biopharmaceutical companies.

Big data and analytics are playing indispensable roles in fostering those enhanced relationships as they vastly enrich the remarkable but isolated wonder of genome-on-a-thumb-drive by giving healthcare providers and drug makers the ability to explore and analyze genomic and proteomic data not just for an individual but in aggregate for millions of people.

In a panel discussion last week in New York City at the Galien Forum 2012, moderator Kris Joshi, Ph.D., reminded the audience that for these advances to reach their full potential and have the greatest impact on the largest number of people around the globe, it’s essential to bear in mind that “Genomics is team sport.”

And just as in sports, deeply collaborative teams can accomplish more than individuals can, Joshi said.
“There are multiple kinds of “Omics” data being explored—genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and more,” he said, and to achieve the best outcomes, “we can’t leave anything to the imagination.”

On top of that, huge volumes of public-domain reference data take on new meaning as they are used alongside individual patient data to offer greater context, depth, and insight, said Joshi, who is Global Vice President for Healthcare within Oracle’s Health Sciences unit.

“So, you can’t just provide care for a patient in isolation anymore—you have to look at data beyond your walls—but the reality is that most health systems are simply not set up to do that today,” said Joshi.

The big stumbling block for many health systems is their inability to properly analyze the vast stores of data they have, either because the data are isolated in disparate and incompatible systems around the organization, or because the analytical tools at hand are simply not powerful enough and sophisticated enough to handle these complex data challenges. (To see how $10-billion global healthcare enterprise UPMC is overcoming that healthcare-analytics challenge, please check out our recent column called UPMC Picks Oracle to ‘Unlock Secrets of Human Health’.)

“Health systems will have to go rapidly from a one-size-fits-all model of treatment to a more customized model, which still uses mass-manufactured but where treatments are selected for patients based on specific biomarkers,” Joshi said.

“But we can now see the next advance in personalized medicine potentially going even further, something much more personalized, like a tailor-made suit. At first, like a tailor-made suit, it is likely to be expensive and exclusive, but over time it will become a commodity that people come to expect.”

And because of the recent advances in Big-Data solutions and advanced analytics, Joshi said, “Personalized medicine on a broad scale can now be contemplated: we see it in action today in oncology with very specific, targeted treatments that are saving lives, even though from a broader perspective it might seem a bit distant.”

 


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Social Network for Diabetics Launches Blood Sugar Tracking App - SocialTimes

Social Network for Diabetics Launches Blood Sugar Tracking App - SocialTimes | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Diabetes patients have to check their blood glucose levels like some people check their Facebook pages: several times a day.

With the rise of mobile apps that let users log everything from running to restaurant attendance, it seemed natural to Alliance Health Networks, makers of the Diabetic Connect social network, to create an app for people with diabetes to track their personal health records and get support from their friends.


Via Alex Butler, Olivier Delannoy, Agathe Quignot
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EHRs speed up disability claims process for Social Security Administration - FierceEMR

EHRs speed up disability claims process for Social Security Administration - FierceEMR | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A software system that uses electronic health records in processing Social Security Administration disability claims could reduce the time to determine eligibility from months to days.
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