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Mhealth : How to use an iPhone to diagnose eye disease

Mhealth : How to use an iPhone to diagnose eye disease | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers have developed a simple technique of fundus (retinal) photography in human and rabbit eyes using a iPhone, an inexpensive app, and instruments that are readily available in an ophthalmic practice, as described in the Journal of Ophthalmology (open access).

 

Commercial fundus cameras can cost tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars, making the technology out of reach for smaller ophthalmic practices and to physicians in third-world countries.

 

But previous techniques of fundus imaging were often difficult to repeat, partly because video capture using Apple’s built-in camera app in iPhones cannot independently control the focus and the exposure, which results in glare and poor image quality.

 

“Our technique provides a simpler and higher quality method to more consistently produce excellent images of a patient’s fundus,” said senior author Shizuo Mukai, M.D.,Mass. Eye and Ear retina specialist and Harvard Medical School associate professor of Ophthalmology.

 

“This technique has been extremely helpful for us in the emergency department setting,  in-patient consultations, and during examinations under anesthesia as it provides a cheaper and portable option for high-quality fundus-image acquisition for documentation and consultation. The technique is well tolerated in awake patients most likely since the light intensity used is often well below that which is used in standard indirect ophthalmoscopy.”

  


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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient

89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

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Dave Burianek's comment, May 15, 2014 8:45 AM
I think this is interesting.. and as we think about the whole integrated care delivery model, this data and information will play a critical part. Of those practices that Humana will own or be part of in a significant way, I believe we can make this happen. For those docs with small practices, we would need to find the right motivation to have them leverage this info. Do we offer it to them? such as ipads for usage during an office visit? we have to make it simple yet provide the best information so they could provide the best quality of care.
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
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Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not?

Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
I think it’s fair to say that digital health is warming up. And not just in one area.
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Healthy Children is a useful app for parents

Healthy Children is a useful app for parents | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The Healthy Children app provides the AAP’s popular patient and parent site in mobile app form. The post Healthy Children is a useful app for parents appeared first on iMedicalApps.
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Scientists are trying to model our mental health based on our tweets

Scientists are trying to model our mental health based on our tweets | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

During the holiday season, ideally filled with family, food, and festivities, the topic of depression is often sidelined; even more of a taboo subject than usual. But research suggests it is one of our most persistent blights, ranked ninth in the world behind the major killers, such as heart disease, stroke, and HIV, according to Nature.

 

Now researchers from multiple disciplines, in both the public and private sectors, are working on various algorithms and approaches to measure a range of mental health trends via large volumes of online activity. Issues such as depression and seasonal anxiety disorder aren’t the first health trends to be investigated in this way – think Google Flu Trends, for instance – but they represent an entry point for researchers, one that most recently has been hailed by a team at Johns Hopkins reporting on techniques that could play a key role in measuring mental health metrics.

 

 


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Ebola, Twitter, and misinformation: a dangerous combination?

Ebola, Twitter, and misinformation: a dangerous combination? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

#The recent Ebola outbreak in west Africa has affected countries deeply in need of foreign aid.1 People desperately need correct information on how to prevent and treat Ebola. Despite the poverty, the increasing spread of computers, tablets, and smartphones in the region creates an opportunity for the rapid dissemination of information through the internet and social media, but there is no guarantee that this information is correct. After reports that misinformation spread by text messages led to deaths,2 3 we checked the quality of Ebola related information on Twitter.

We used the Twitter search engine to collect all tweets in English with the terms “Ebola” and “prevention” or “cure” from Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria during 1 to 7 September 2014. We grouped them into medically correct information, medical misinformation, and other (including tweets of a spiritual nature). Most tweets and retweets contained misinformation, and misinformation had a much larger potential reach than correct information (table⇓).

The most common misinformation was that Ebola might be cured by the plant ewedu or by blood transfusion (unqualified—not just from Ebola survivors). Drinking and washing in salty water were also mentioned. Among these tweets, 248 (44%) were retweeted at least once; 95 of these contained scientifically correct information (38.3%), whereas 146 contained medical misinformation (58.9%; P<0.001). Two of these tweets—“Take ewedu daily to prevent and cure Ebola LUTH doctor urges Nigerians” and “Herbal healers’ claim to cure Ebola false”—were retweeted 23 and 24 times, respectively.

While most erroneous tweets were left undisputed, in some cases they were corrected by a Nigerian government agency and this correction spread on Twitter three days later. Public health and government agencies in west Africa should use Twitter to spread correct information and amend misinformation on how to deal with this emergency.


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2014's Most Popular Medical Stories About The Future of Medicine

2014's Most Popular Medical Stories About The Future of Medicine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Here are the most important and interesting news and announcements about the future of healthcare & medicine in 2014 month by month. I hope you will enjoy looking back in time. January 20 Predi...
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Healthcare dominates Google's venture investments in 2014

Healthcare dominates Google's venture investments in 2014 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Healthcare accounted for 36 percent of Google Venture investments in 2014 in 12 companies spanning diagnostics, predictive analytics, telemedicine.
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Carrie Yeager's curator insight, December 28, 2014 9:59 PM

Healthcare offered via the Internet is gaining momentum.

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Disruptors in Medtech Should Not Ignore Compliance | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

Disruptors in Medtech Should Not Ignore Compliance | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The $3 trillion healthcare market has its lure.

By last year, 24 of the Fortune 50 companies had elbowed their way through healthcare’s front door. 

Built around new, disruptive technologies, many new entrants are focused on the device side of the business. However, these new entrants must not overlook one critical element during the development cycle: the web of compliance requirements threaded throughout healthcare.

So far these nontraditional healthcare companies developing medical products have primarily focused on innovative technology. The examples are numerous - Apple has launched a mobile health product capable of monitoring heart rate, Verizon introduced healthcare IT solutions connecting clinicians to their patients, and AT&T has launched mHealth, a platform for mobile application development.

However, as companies venture into deeper waters, they must become fluent in the alphabet soup of government regulatory bodies and industry standards entities that enforce compliance requirements in multiple phases of the product lifecycle. The AMA (American Medical Association); CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services); FDA (Food and Drug Administration); as well as HHS’s OIG (Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General) all have roles in R&D, development, launch and commercialization.

The laws and standards these entities enforce impact nearly all operations of the medtech industry, including commercial practices, development, medical affairs, testing, manufacturing, documentation, billing, reimbursement, risk assessment, traceability, practice ethics, patient rights, referral laws, interactions with doctors and government officials and more.

For companies whose core business is not heavily regulated, developing the infrastructure and culture of compliance can be especially daunting. But failing to proactively plan for and develop a compliance program doesn’t simply risk a company’s entrance into the healthcare space; it can jeopardize a new entrant’s larger organization if liabilities arise that can affect other business units.

Pause, if you will, before that dizzying array of rules and regs, but recognize that, somewhere out there, a potential competitor is already moving along the compliance pathway. Analysis of government filings by PwC’s Health Research Institute identified 24 digital health devices that were cleared by the FDA in just the first 10 months of 2014. So sitting back is no solution  if you are committed to providing better offerings.

What should a new entrant do as it develops new products?

Factor compliance risks into business structureMake sure the compliance organization is scalable andKnow the universe of risks and regulations.

Factor compliance risks into business structure when developing a medical entity
We recommend both legal and physical separation of a medical business from non-medical lines through the creation of a separate business unit. This structure limits the exposure for nonhealthcare business units to healthcare-specific compliance risks.

Consider the case where the company is using the same manufacturing facility to manufacture medical as well as nonmedical products. In a worst-case scenario of noncompliance, were a regulatory agency to shut down a facility’s manufacturing, both medical and non-medical business housed there would be impacted.

In addition to minimizing risk, separation can protect nonmedical business lines by helping streamline operations and simplifying compliance requirements. For example, the separation of medical and nonmedical businesses makes it possible for healthcare-specific training to be mandated only for those working on medical products, instead of forcing the entire corporation through a training program regardless of an employee’s involvement with medical products. Other similar efficiencies may also be found in areas of R&D, manufacturing, sales and marketing.

Make sure your compliance structure is scalable, and comes with a robust oversight mechanism
A robust compliance organization is the single most important mechanism to manage compliance risks. Further, that organization must be scalable beyond the initial, startup nature of the business. Importantly, those growth needs must be considered at early phases of development.

One of the most effective compliance organization structures in PwC’s experience has a single executive in charge of compliance requirements reporting directly to the head of the medical business unit. This supports operational simplicity while outlining clear roles and responsibilities at the executive level.

This also provides an independent, internal evaluation of potential risk issues and minimizes conflicts of interest that could come from reporting to other departments. In this way, potential compliance issues can be raised to the proper level, and receive the proper attention, without being unduly influenced by financial or other business metrics.

Know the universe of risks and regulations applicable to your health business
New entrants need to thoroughly analyze applicable compliance risks and regulations. Some compliance requirements depend on product complexity while others depend on the target customer.

Here is a list of industry compliance standards and regulatory guidance that is a great place to start in order to develop a best-fit risk control framework:

AMA Code of Medical Ethics Opinion 8.061 – Gifts to Physicians from IndustryAdvaMed Code of Ethics on Interactions with Healthcare Professionals (revised 2009)Enforcement Lessons: Settlement AgreementsFederal Sentencing Guidelines Chapter 8 Organizational Guidelines (revised 2004, 2010)HHS’s OIG Compliance Program Guidance for Medical Device ManufacturersOther HHS OIG Guidance: OIG WorkPlan, Advisory Opinions, Fraud & Alert BulletinsSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002; and21 CFR Regulations: Part 11, 803, 806, & 820.

There are real ramifications of noncompliance.  A failure in this regard can result in millions of dollars of direct losses as well as significant collateral damage to the company. Noncompliance may also impact timeline for launching products, even costing companies their first-mover advantage.

At the end of the day, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to address all compliance challenges. Each company needs to determine what is best for them, grounding that decision on factors such as operational size, risk exposure and the type of products they will be introducing into the market.

The good news is that with the proper business structure, a scalable compliance organization, and knowledge of the risk landscape, compliance need not throttle a company’s innovation pipeline. Indeed, compliance protects the company, prevents destructive risk, and can provide competitive advantages.

--By James S. Varelis, Principal, PwC Health Industries, Pharmaceutical & Life Sciences sector

 


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Reports: Mobile Apps Capture Most Internet Time, Exceed TV

Reports: Mobile Apps Capture Most Internet Time, Exceed TV | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Mobile is the top attention medium in the US. That's been confirmed by Flurry, Nielsen, ad network InMobi and once again by comScore, which affirmed to Int
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Why We’re Getting Patient Engagement Backwards | The Health Care Blog

Why We’re Getting Patient Engagement Backwards | The Health Care Blog | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
There’s a mantra in healthcare right now to “drive patient engagement.” The idea is that informed and engaged patients play a crucial role in improving the quality of care our health system delivers. With the right information, these healthcare consumers will be more active participants in their care, select providers based on quality and value metrics, demand appropriate, high-quality, high-value services and choose treatment options wisely after a thorough process of shared decision-making.

This drive for patient engagement often fails to recognize one important truth: Our healthcare system inadvertently, yet potently, discourages engagement. It ignores the fact that the patient is already the most engaged person in healthcare. The patient bears the disease, the pain, the scar – and, ultimately, the bill. In our search for greater engagement, we must realize what the comic strip Pogo said years ago – “we have met the enemy, and he is us.”

As physicians, we expect patients to bring test results to an appointment – because patient information is often not shared throughout our complex and fragmented systems. We expect patients to remember their entire health history, and repeat it ad nauseum as our unconnected systems fail to share. We ask them to recount the complex names of the all the drugs they are taking – and at what doses. And it’s not uncommon for these questions to be asked many times in a single hospitalization, during outpatient visits, and again each time a patient encounters a new caregiver.

The reality is that patients have no choice but to be engaged. They are provided these details in an inefficient way that causes a lot of frustration, worry and fear on top of already stressful medical concerns. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reports that one in three patients experience gaps in information exchange, which we rely on the patient to solve. I suspect this number is a significant underestimate because we are so used to this level of fragmentation and repetition, that we no longer see it for the system failure it is.

We need to think less about the patient being more engaged, and focus on how we can simplify, encourage and automate engagement tools on behalf of the patient.

People are accustomed to integrated, automated, 24-hour customer service in almost every other industry. How does Netflix know what type of movies you like? By analyzing your watch list and ratings against millions of other records in its database. How does Amazon know what you want to buy – sometimes even before you do? By looking at your purchase history and known interests to predict your next purchase. A growing list of best-in-class retailers remember our preferences, our home address and our personal details – and they are only selling us STUFF.

Yet, when it comes to our most important asset – our health – the consumer experience is dependent on fax machines, scribbled notes, hand-carried print-outs and the memories of those most in need of care. If our healthcare system were to implement the automation, connection and coordination that other industries have used to change the face of consumer engagement, boosting patient engagement wouldn’t be an issue. We would instead be easing the burdens on the very patients we are trying to help.

Patients and their families are desperate for improved interactions and engagement tools. A recent story detailed how concerned parents – who were also engineers – figured out how to hack into their diabetic children’s glucose monitors so they could remotely track their blood sugar levels. Should something so essential to managing a loved ones’ health require it to be hacked to make that data accessible?

There are no technological reasons why these medical devices don’t share data, why hospital pricing is so opaque and why electronic medical records don’t share information automatically with all of a patient’s providers. In fact, the hurdles blocking the path to a more seamless, welcoming and user-friendly healthcare system are old habits, proprietary business models and a lack of patient-centered care.

We have to improve how our healthcare system engages with patients by getting the various technologies used to take care of people talking to each other. Additionally, we need to provide transparent pricing information or we won’t succeed in delivering better individual care, managing population health or lowering costs.

Effective patient engagement shouldn’t require patients to bear the burden of remembering all of their previous treatments or creating their own healthcare innovations to access their patient data. An automated, connected and coordinated system is needed before we can reap the benefits of effective patient engagement. Until we have such a model, we’re simply asking consumers to take too much responsibility for transforming a broken healthcare system they didn’t create – a system that should be serving them, not the other way around.

Joseph Smith, MD. PhD (@JoeSmithMD), a cardiologist, cardiac electrophysiologist and engineer, is chief medical and science officer of theGary and Mary West Health Institute (@WestHealth), an independent, nonprofit medical research organization that works with healthcare providers and research institutions to create new, more effective ways of delivering care.


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Keith McGuinness's curator insight, January 18, 3:26 PM

Add in the potential of emerging digital therapeutics (aka health apps) to help prevent and manage chronic disease.  These tools of precarious potential are being developed as consumer products near the event horizon of the black hole we call health care.  Stay tuned.

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How To Track Your Life With Apple Health

How To Track Your Life With Apple Health | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
How To Track Your Life With Apple Health14,2363David NieldProfileFollowDavid NieldFiled to: Apple HealthiOS Tuesday 11:30amShare to KinjaShare to FacebookShare to TwitterGo to permalink

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We've already taken a look at some of the features and capabilities of Google Fit, and Apple's own activity-tracking platform is now up and running too. Find out how you can use Apple's brand new app to monitor your daily exercise, improve your overall health, aggregate data from different sources and store your medical information.

The Apple Health app appears in iOS 8 on the iPhone 4s or later and the fifth generation iPod Touch. It will use the data automatically pulled from the sensors in your phone to try and build up a picture of your activity and your habits, but you can plug in third-party devices and services as well: Endomondo, Runtastic, Garmin Connect, Nutrino, Qardio and dozens of others all plug into Health and the underlying HealthKit platform in some way (though there are some big name holdouts).

Automatic monitoring

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Open up the Health app on a new iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus and you'll see that steps, distance covered and flights climbed are all being tracked for you courtesy of the M8 motion coprocessor built into the device. If you've hooked up Health with some other apps and data sources, you can also see statistics on calories burned, weight, heart rate and just about everything else here.

The Day, Week, Month and Year buttons at the top of the screen let you see your data over a shorter or longer period of time. Tap on any chart for a more detailed breakdown; the subsequent screen lets you show or hide graphs on the main dashboard, add data points manually, and choose which data is included in the overview. Follow the Show All Data link and you can see exactly what information was recorded when.

Apple Health records so much information that you're probably going to want to limit the number of graphs that are shown on the dashboard and focus solely on the statistics that are most important to you. It's possible to dig down into any of the other screens at any time, if you need to, though checking up on your progress over time isn't particularly easy to do.

Health Data

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Tap the Health Data icon at the foot of the interface to reveal all of the different types of information that Apple's app can keep track of. This covers a wide range of data points, from your date of birth to the number of times you've fallen over. In each case data can be added manually or fed through a connected app or gadget. If you're looking for something in particular, make use of the search field at the top.

For example, tap Sleep and then Sleep Analysis to see how much shut-eye you're getting at the moment. If you haven't connected anything that's able to measure this data automatically, you can log the time you've spent asleep and in bed manually: Select Add Data Point and fill in the relevant details. Toggle the Share on Dashboard button to add the chart to your overview screen.

The other sections in Health Data work along similar lines, though of course in the long-term you want to be piping this information in automatically rather than constantly typing out everything that's happening. The number of apps compatible with Health and HealthKit is growing, though—take Instant Heart Rate, for example, for measuring your heart rate with your phone's camera, or 7 Minute Workout for giving you a motivational prod.

Third-party services

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Install an app that works with Health—such as the aforementioned Instant Heart Rate—and somewhere in the app will be an option to share the data it collects with Apple's framework. With this feature activated you should see data begin to be collated: Tap through into the type of data on the Health Data screen to see the information that has been logged and by which app.

All of these apps will work slightly differently, which is why Apple Health has so much potential in terms of being the central focal point for data coming in from multiple sensors and apps. Some apps will send data to Health, some will take data from it, and some will do both. Check the help information supplied with the app involved if you're not sure.

Jawbone's UP app is one of the more high-profile ones to introduce Health compatibility, and it can both read from and write to the Health app. Essentially, that means you can use your UP wristband with Apple Health, or try out the UP app without a wearable using the data pulled from Health and your iPhone's sensors. To see all of your connected apps in one place, go into Health and tap the Sources button: From the list of entries you can manage which sorts of data are shared (Sleep Analysis and Steps in the case of the UP app) and in which direction.

Your Medical ID

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The last section in the Health app is Medical ID and it's here that you can store vital information such as allergies and your organ donor status. Choose to Create Medical ID from the front screen and you can enter details of medical conditions, your age, height and weight, any medications you're currently taking, your blood type and an emergency contact who can be called in the case of an emergency.

It's in an emergency where this Medical ID could be the most useful. You'll notice a Show When Locked toggle switch at the top of the screen, and when this is switched on a link to your ID will appear on your device's lock screen. Whoever picks up your phone can tap on the Emergency button then the Medical ID one to find all of the information that you've left. If you'd rather it was kept hidden, disable the feature.

Apple Health still has a long way to go. Some better data analysis would be welcome, for example, and there's no easy way to go back through your statistics, but it's a confident start and one that's currently more comprehensive than Google's comparable offering. If you're an iPhone user then it's automatic monitoring capabilities might just be enough to get you to take your health more seriously.


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10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine

10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it


More More: Health Medicine Innovation Future
10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine

    Erin Brodwin

    Nov. 5, 2014, 6:00 AM
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elizabeth holmes theranosCourtesy Theranos

The future of medicine has arrived.

No, we're not talking about robot surgeons, implantable memory-augmentation devices, or doctors wearing Google Glass. The game-changing innovations on this list are more than distant dreams or inventions no one really knows what to with yet. Most should be available as early as 2015.

Every year, the Cleveland Clinic comes up with a list of new devices or treatments that are expected to help improve our daily lives and reduce our risks of developing disease. Only time will tell whether their considerable promise pans out.

Here are the top 10 new medications, treatments, and technologies to watch for in 2015, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
1. Mobile Stroke Unit

What if there were a drug that could lessen the brain damage caused by a stroke by targeting the blood clot that caused it and breaking it up?

As it turns out, there is. It's called tPA, and the faster it's given after a stroke, the safer and more effective it is. Here's the problem: Most people don't get the drug in time, and it can only be administered via IV. Lack of access to quick treatment can have dire consequences — someone in the US dies from stroke every four minutes.

Mobile stroke treatment units solve this problem by taking tPA directly to the patient. The units are essentially ambulances outfitted with everything health professionals need to treat a patient suffering from a stroke and staffed by an onboard paramedic, a critical care nurse, and a CT technologist. A broadband video link allows the onboard team to virtually contact a hospital stroke neurologist to guide treatment.
2. Dengue Vaccinepolio vaccine afghanistan childMohammad Ismail/Reuters

Close to half the world's population is at risk for developing dengue, a disease characterized by high fever, nausea and vomiting, and pain behind the eyes and in the muscles, bones, and joints. The virus kills some 20,000 people each year and is spread by mosquitoes. One of the biggest challenges in creating a vaccine against dengue is that it is caused by five different related, but not identical, strains. Even protection from one type will still leave you susceptible to the four other forms.

But scientists have reason to be hopeful this year.

A vaccine that just went through the last phase of testing was found to be 60% effective, on average, in protecting people against the disease, and 95.5% protective against the disease in its most severe form, as dengue hemorrhagic fever. While the vaccine is far from perfect, "it’s the best dengue vaccine so far," MIT immunologist Jianzhu Chen told The Verge. The new vaccine also reduced the number of people who needed to be hospitalized by bringing down the onset of fever by 80%. Fever is one of the virus's most potentially fatal complications, especially when it occurs in children under age 10. The vaccine is expected to be available in early 2015.
3. One-Drop Blood Testing

Bye, bye, needles.

Instead of getting blood drawn the conventional way, a new technology will let doctors — or pharmacists, even — run hundreds of tests with a single drop of blood from a finger prick. While a standard lipid panel, one of the most common blood tests done in the US, can cost between $10 and $100 depending on where it's done, the current advertised cost of the new test is $2.99.
4. Better Cholesterol-Reducing Drugs

Too much cholesterol in the blood can collect inside our arteries and plug them up, causing heart disease and death. While many people use statins, a special type of drug that can help lower cholesterol, some people's cholesterol levels simply don't respond to treatment.

There's a new type of injectable drug just for those patients called PCSK9. In studies, the drug has been successful at reducing cholesterol levels in people whose high cholesterol levels didn't respond to statins.

The best part? No trip to the hospital or clinic required. The drug can be injected at home, like insulin, and only requires one or two treatments a month. The FDA is expected to approve the first PCSK9 in 2015.

Cancer cellsjovan vitanovski/Shutterstock

5. Precision Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy and radiation can save lives, but the intense treatment harms healthy cells in the process of taking down cancerous ones. As a result, many cancer patients experience side effects ranging from hair loss to crippling nausea and extreme fatigue.

But a new class of drugs targets cancer cells and leaves healthy tissues alone.

The drugs are a form of precision treatment that combines antibodies — the molecules the immune system uses to locate and stop harmful viruses — with a powerful toxin that kills a cancerous cell from within.

While these drugs, called antibody-drug conjugates, won't be a cure-all, more than 24 are in clinical trials for solid tumors and blood cancer. Some that have been designed to treat other types of cancer, including HER2-positive breast cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, are already available.
6. Wireless Pacemaker

The first pacemaker was implanted in 1958. Since then, doctors have continued using pacemakers connected electrically to the heart via a complex system of tiny wires. Unfortunately, those wires can break or get dislodged in the body. Their insulation can also become cracked and lead to an infection.

This new pacemaker is wireless, 10% of the size of a conventional pacemaker (about the size of a large vitamin), and is implanted directly in the heart — no lengthy surgery required.

Doctors simply use a catheter in a leg vein to steer the device into the heart, a process that takes about 20 minutes. The lithium-battery-powered device lasts up to 7 years and is currently undergoing late stage clinical trials. It was first implanted into a patient in Ohio in February.

Pills
8. New Medications For Deadly Lung Disease

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis is a deadly, untreatable disease whose cause remains unknown. Scar tissue builds up inside the lungs, thickening its tissues and making breathing difficult. Many people diagnosed with IPF only live another 3-5 years; more than 30,000 Americans get such a diagnosis each year.

Two new drugs found to reduce scar tissue and improve lung function in patients got FDA approval in October. One appears to work by calming inflammation while the other blocks a protein that tells the lungs to make scar tissue. We don't yet know if these drugs will work for all patients, but they're the first that show promise in slowing the disease's progression.
9. Cheaper, More Convenient Breast Cancer Treatment

Close to a quarter million people will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, according to the American Cancer Society; 40,000 women will die from the disease. Radiation therapy, the leading treatment used to beat back the disease, can be inconvenient and expensive. As a result, some people simply stop getting treatment, according to researchers at the Cleveland Clinic.

The Cleveland Clinic estimates that intraoperative radiation therapy, which would involve giving a patient a single dose of radiation after surgery to remove tumors, would cost one-fifth the sticker price of traditional radiation treatment, which can sometimes involve up to 20 doses.
10. A Pill That Protects The Heart From Failing

Nearly 55,000 people die each year when their hearts become too weak to pump blood. Today, most people at risk of heart failure treat their condition with two drugs: ACE inhibitors and beta blockers, which work by opening up the blood vessels and making it easier for the heart to push blood throughout the body. But they're not a perfect fix.

A new drug could further reduce the risk of heart failure. In a study of 8,000 patients, researchers testing the new treatment, called Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI), had to stop testing because the patients receiving the new drug had far better health outcomes than those taking traditional drugs. Compared to people taking traditional heart failure drugs, people getting ARNI were 20% less likely to be hospitalized for heart failure and 16% less likely to die from any cause during the study.

Read more: http://uk.businessinsider.com/how-will-medicine-change-in-2015-2014-11?r=US#ixzz3MBXjZYhr

 

 


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Matt Coleman's curator insight, December 19, 2014 3:24 AM

Let's hope some of these amazing new options make it to market in 2015

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Santé : la vidéo, média par excellence ? - Club Digital Santé

Santé : la vidéo, média par excellence ? - Club Digital Santé | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Santé : la vidéo, média par excellence ?Posted on 04/12/2014 by Club Digital Santé wrote in Tribune de la semaine. It has 1 Comment.

La vidéo est aujourd’hui le média le plus plébiscité par les internautes à travers le monde. De nombreuses initiatives utilisant ce média fleurissent dans le domaine de la santé. Décryptage d’une tendance croissante.

La vidéo est aujourd’hui très présente sur les supports digitaux et notamment dans le domaine de la santé. Aujourd’hui l’impact de ce format de communication est beaucoup plus important que les canaux traditionnels comme l’affichage, la presse ou les spots radio. Les différents acteurs du monde de la santé l’ont bien compris avec le déploiement de nombreuses initiatives.

Un formidable outil de prévention et de sensibilisation

Vous n’avez pas pu passer à côté de cette vidéo de prévention de l’association « Cancer Testiculaire Canadien » autour du dépistage du cancer des testicules qui a battu les records d’audience la semaine dernière (+1 millions de vues sur Vimeo et YouTube) :

Cet exemple nous montre que ce canal de communication est aujourd’hui un formidable outil de prévention qui est de plus en plus utilisé par les associations de patients, de santé publique et l’ensemble des acteurs de santé.

Autre exemple récent, celui de l’Association Valentin Haüy qui a proposé aux internautes de vivre certaines situations rencontrées par les aveugles et malvoyants au travers d’une expérience inédite : « 5 jours dans le noir » :

 

Web série : format prisé par la pharma

L’industrie pharmaceutique a pris conscience de l’impact du média vidéo. Parmi les différents formats vidéo, les web séries sont très prisées. Ce format de vidéo est utilisé pour susciter l’intérêt des internautes. Il s’agit d’une série de vidéo, le plus souvent sur un ton décalé et humoristique pour mémoriser les messages. L’identification à des personnages, à une histoire permet une meilleure adhésion au message et favorise la viralité des vidéos.

Parmi les dernières web séries santé diffusées sur la toile, « Il paraît que la pilule… » du laboratoire Biogaran, web série autour de la contraception orale pour chasser les idées reçues et répondre aux questions des jeunes filles :

 

Les Entreprises du Médicament utilisent également ce format depuis plusieurs années pour sensibiliser le grand public sur les problématiques liées aux médicaments.

Web TV : véritable vecteur de communication

De nombreuses Web TV, notamment via la plateforme YouTube, ont émergées dans le domaine de la santé. Ce canal de communication représente un relais d’information, de mobilisation et de pédagogie pour une entreprise, une association ou un établissement hospitalier. Il permet de centraliser l’ensemble de sa production vidéo et de la faire durer dans le temps. Dans le domaine de la santé, de nombreuses associations de patients possèdent leur Web TV, utilisé comme vecteur de communication pour des campagnes de sensibilisation ou des partages de témoignages. On peut citer en exemple l’association Renaloo avec Renaloo TV ou l’association AMFE.

Les établissements de santé ont également compris l’importance de ce média dans leur relation avec les patients. L’AP-HM a lancé dès début 2013 une Web TV CancérO destinée à informer et rassurer les patients atteints de cancer. L’hôpital Necker-Enfants malades propose également sa Web TV avec de nombreuses vidéos présentant l’établissement, des témoignages de patients, professionnels de santé…

Nous l’avons vu, aujourd’hui la vidéo est la reine du web. Quel canal arrivera à détrôner ce média ?

Rémy Teston

Digital Health Marketing Manager
Buzz e-santé
Retouvez-moi sur twitter et sur LinkedIn.


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Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content

Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Quick reference apps are great, but only when their content is up to date. The post Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content appeared first on iMedicalApps.
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How Cloud Computing is Changing the Health Care...

How Cloud Computing is Changing the Health Care... | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The accelerating migration to cloud computing represents a change for the way the healthcare industry sources its health information technology.
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Big-Data in Health Care: Patient data analyses has great potential

Big-Data potential in Health care and daily practical work of doctors, nurses and health care professionals. Through self tracking, social media & text analysi…

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Oncologist use of Digital in Q2 2014 [Infographic]

Oncologist use of Digital in Q2 2014 [Infographic] | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
[fullwidth_text alt_background=none width=1/1...

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Happy New Year and thanks for an amazing 2014! - Blog - Healthy Startups - Storytelling for health innovation

Happy New Year and thanks for an amazing 2014! - Blog - Healthy Startups - Storytelling for health innovation | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Jason Berek-Lewis Founder @ Healthy Startups What an amazing year! 2014 has been the ul...
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Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app

Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A great evidenced based medical app that helps you perform various MSK exams effectively The post Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app appeared first on iMedicalApps.
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Why Virtual Reality Doesn't Need a Killer App to Get Huge | WIRED

Why Virtual Reality Doesn't Need a Killer App to Get Huge | WIRED | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

On a frosty December morning in 1783, some 400,000 people gathered in the Tuileries Gardens in Paris to see the world’s first manned flight in a hydrogen balloon. Jacques Charles and his assistant, Nicolas-Louis Robert, ascended 1,800 feet into the sky accompanied by a mercury barometer, some sandbags, and a few bottles of champagne.

“Nothing will ever quite equal that moment of total hilarity that filled my whole body at the moment of take-off,” Charles later wrote. “I felt we were flying away from the Earth and all its troubles for ever.”

Back on the ground, feelings were more ambivalent. Benjamin Franklin, then the American ambassador to France, watched the scene from his carriage. A cynical companion remarked, “What’s the use of a balloon?” Franklin, aghast, replied, “What’s the use of a newborn baby?”

His point: You’re not thinking big enough.

When Joseph Banks, then the president of England’s Royal Society, first got word in a letter from Franklin about the balloons, he too demanded to know their practical applications. There were some obvious implementations—geographical mapping and military reconnaissance sprung first to mind—but he questioned whether ballooning could otherwise “prove beneficial either to society or science.” Banks proposed one such practical use-case: a system using balloons to reduce the load on horse-pulled wagons. The idea was that broad-wheeled wagons, which normally would require eight horses to draw, would need just two using such a method.

Franklin, with a bit more foresight, argued ballooning could “pave the way to some discoveries in Natural Philosophy of which at present we have no conception.” He compared ballooning to “magnetism and electricity, of which the first experiments were mere matters of amusement.”

The Small Thinking That Plagued Ballooning Also Plagues VR

Like those hydrogen balloons, small thinking has plagued the development of one of today’s flashiest technologies, virtual reality devices. When Oculus, the company that (literally) kickstarted the new VR revolution, originally pitched its device as a “headset designed specifically for video games that will change the way you think about gaming forever,” hardly anyone—least of all gamers—questioned the idea that VR should be anything other than a high-end gaming accessory. Like a new graphics card or a better TV, it would be a logical, utilitarian improvement to current display technology for games—a horse-drawn carriage, now improved with balloons.

We’ve had a few years to get used to the idea of VR, and some have started getting a little more high-minded about its possibilities. WIRED has been eager to lead the charge, as when it declared a few months ago that VR will “change gaming, movies, TV, music, design, medicine, sex, sports, art, travel, social networking, education, and reality.” Of course, it always has been the tendency of magazines to breathlessly celebrate new technologies. In a 1788 article, Gentleman’s Magazine (the first periodical to use the word “magazine” to describe itself) celebrated the advent of hydrogen ballooning as “the most magnificent and astonishing discovery that has been made for many ages, or perhaps since the creation.” Time, Gentleman’s Magazine assured its readers, would reveal the utility of ballooning experiments.

Now, though, even the most breathlessly optimistic VR fanboys can’t help but ask: What will be “the killer app” for these new devices? (Palmer Luckey’s Franklin-esque response? “What’s the real world’s killer app?”)


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Update: In 2015, interesting digital health collaborations on tap for pharma

Qualcomm LIfe General Manager Rick Valencia said we'll see a lot more collaboration between pharma companies next year as integrate digital health solutions.
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CellScope’s iPhone-enabled otoscope, remote consultation service launches for CA parents

CellScope’s iPhone-enabled otoscope, remote consultation service launches for CA parents | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Parents in California who have children who get chronic ear infections will soon have a more convenient way to get their kids care.

San Francisco-based CellScope, a Khosla Ventures-backed Rock Health alum, has begun taking preorders for its FDA registered smartphone-enabled otoscope, called Oto Home.

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, December 18, 2014 6:16 AM

Otoscopios para padres conectados  con el profesional vía telemedicina ¿qué os parece la idea?

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Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world

Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The social media landscape is constantly evolving. Given the strong interest and comments received from our members, we have published an updated version of the map.

The proliferation of small and large communities is the result ofphysicians’ increasing need to share ideas and discuss clinical cases with colleagues in every part of the world. 
The analysis highlights a very complex social landscape, with a very strong community presence in the US, but also a significant presence of more or less large local communities almost worldwide.

The more the number of communities grow, the greater the need to create stronger niche communities, increasingly unfolding the landascape of physician communities. Trying to find some differentiating features in theaggregation trend of physician communities, we have identified 3 main features:

SpecialtyLocationTrustworthy Provider


Specialized communities

“Specialized” communities tend to be a smaller group and represent the long tail of physician communities, with a small but very specialized number of subscribers. In this type of aggregation the common feature is the professional specialty and consequently a common specific area of interest. In the radiology field, for example, there are many examples of specialized communities like Radrounds.com or Radiopolis.com.

Location specific communities

Location specific communities usually represent an aggregation of physicians that come from thesame country or speak the same language.

These kinds of communities are generally larger than the specialized ones, since they tend to include all physician specialities.

Usually physicians turn to location specific communities for two main reasons. The first is language, especially in Europe, where due to the multitude of different European languages, localized communities are proliferating quickly. The second is related to local roles and rules shared by physicians coming from the same country with regard to their medical or practice management issues.

Examples of localized communities are DocCheck in Germany and Doctors.net.uk in UK that represent the top European physician communities.

What is also interesting is the presence of physician communities in emerging markets. In China for example the dxy.cn community has 1,7 million members, of which 50% are physicians.

Trustworthy Provider based communities

The last (but not least) aggregation factor depends on the community provider's trustworthyness. Many physicians prefer to join communities related to scientific societies they belong to or trusted professional websites that they already consider relevant or reliable information sources. This explains the proliferation of physician communities within professional websites such as BMJ (doc2doc community) or related to medical association websites, such as CardioSource from the American College of Cardiology.

Usually these kinds of communities have a significant number of subscribers, largely also due to their existing physician databases.

The physician community landscape is continuously changing, but there is a trend towards growth of smaller communities, which are able to aggregate and keep active specialist interest groups. The true benchmark for measuring the quality and health of a community in this fragmented scenario will be to measure its social life - in order to understand how active each member really is, communicating, playing and sharing information and knowledge to create collective intelligence.


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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, January 5, 5:44 AM

Physicians dedicated social networks raising up also in Europe....

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Doing Health Care Better Will Involve Using Data Better

Doing Health Care Better Will Involve Using Data Better | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Huge changes are ahead in healthcare. From the Affordable Care Act to new service models to advances in health and fitness technology, the field is definitely in a growth and change mode.

One critical dynamic involves what is known as “big data.” Unlike the smaller bits and pieces of information healthcare providers have always amassed on patients and outcomes, big data has the potential to aggregate the kinds of information that can be truly informative for all stakeholders: consumers, physicians, healthcare companies, and businesses.

Big data, which comes from collecting, processing, and organizing information requires web scraping software and technical savvy. Variously known as “data extraction” or “screen scraping,” it’s the kind of technology firms like Mozenda have been perfecting.

Mozenda and other data miners are basically transforming billions of bits into broad knowledge — or, as Mozenda CEO Brett Haskins describes it: “turning a mountain of data into moments of clarity.”

Many industries have already tapped into the wealth of information found in big data, but healthcare is just getting started. The potential gains in using big data are enormous — from access to the kind of patient case files that can define the healthcare needs of regions or demographic groups to statistics on which health or fitness apps are proving efficacious around the country.

Knowing more about what is really happening — and what is actually working — could create a whole new healthcare world.

The benefits of big data are becoming more obvious every day to the healthcare industry. Information, properly obtained, sorted, and analyzed with the latest extraction technologies, is the foundation upon which the future of healthcare will be built.

In a nutshell, doing health care better will involve using data better.


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Mhealth trends: More behavioral health apps but few for disabling chronic conditions

Mhealth trends: More behavioral health apps but few for disabling chronic conditions | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
An IMS Health report on consumer facing mobile health apps offers an outlook on the future of mobile health technology and has a breakdown of mhealth apps.

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5 Medical Technologies to Watch in 2015: Mobile Medical Apps | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

5 Medical Technologies to Watch in 2015: Mobile Medical Apps | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

More than five years ago, Apple sold consumers on mobile applications by telling them no matter what they want to do, “there’s an app for that.” The same couldn’t be said for healthcare providers and patients.

Last July, there were more than 1.5 billion apps in the iTunes and Google Play stores combined. Less than 2% of them—fewer than 28,000—were classified as medical, according to the publication iMedicalApps.

But thanks to FDA’s risk-based regulatory framework, announced in September 2013, and predictions that the market for mobile medical apps could grow to 26-billion users by 2017, more companies are starting to try their hand at mobile medical apps.

“2014 was the year of the app,” says Steve Wilcox, founder of Philadelphia design firm Design Science.

Consumer tech giants Apple, Google, and Microsoft grabbed headlines with platforms that enable more health and fitness app development, while several traditional medical device companies launched notable apps as well. One is Dexcom’s Follow, which is used in conjunction with a docking cradle to enable diabetics to share data from their continuous glucose monitors.

AliveCor also got FDA clearance for an algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation using its ECG smartphone attachment and app.
As developers become more familiar with FDA regulation, expect to see mobile medical apps jump from simply cool to clinically useful.


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