Mobile Health: Ho...
Follow
Find
32.1K views | +48 today
 
Rescooped by dbtmobile from le monde de la e-santé
onto Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

Wearable Computing Devices will exceed 485 Million Annual Shipments by 2018

Wearable Computing Devices will exceed 485 Million Annual Shipments by 2018 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Wearable computing devices are projected to explode in popularity over the next year and with a wave of new gadgets set to hit the consumer market, could soon become the norm for most people within five years. ABI Research forecasts the wearable computing device market will grow to 485 million annual device shipments by 2018.

 

Currently, sports and activity trackers account for the largest chunk of wearable technologies shipped today. Smart activity trackers are widely available, and the device’s trendy and stylish appearance makes them very popular with a broad range of customers. It is estimated 61% of the wearable technologies market is attributed to sport/activity trackers in 2013.


Via Olivier Janin, Thibaud Guymard, Fabrice Vezin
more...
Olivier Janin's curator insight, June 16, 2013 2:20 AM

In addition, last year's ABI Research projections were that by 2017, 170M wearable wireless devices will be health and fitness related.

http://mobihealthnews.com/16415/by-2017-170m-wearable-wireless-health-and-fitness-devices/

 

eMedToday's curator insight, June 22, 2013 7:42 PM

This is a massive trend. 

From around the web

Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Curated by dbtmobile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Doctor
Scoop.it!

89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient

89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Via Andrew Spong
more...
Dave Burianek's comment, May 15, 2014 8:45 AM
I think this is interesting.. and as we think about the whole integrated care delivery model, this data and information will play a critical part. Of those practices that Humana will own or be part of in a significant way, I believe we can make this happen. For those docs with small practices, we would need to find the right motivation to have them leverage this info. Do we offer it to them? such as ipads for usage during an office visit? we have to make it simple yet provide the best information so they could provide the best quality of care.
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

High-tech bra with sensors helps detect breast cancer

High-tech bra with sensors helps detect breast cancer | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (KGO) --A new technology that could revolutionize breast cancer screening is about to begin clinical trials in the Bay Area. Rather than a mammogram or ultrasound, this system can be used at home, with potentially life-saving information transmitted through a smartphone.

For Dian Gaxiola, a routine breast screening at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View turned out to be a lifesaver. Doctors caught her cancer at a very early stage and saved her breast.

"I was very lucky, I think because of the early detection," cancer survivor Dian Gaxiola said.

El Camino Hospital Radiologist Dr. Sila Yitta says routine mammograms and self-screening are the best defense, although many women don't always take advantage.

"In my experience it is hit or miss, I think women, some women are consistent in doing breast exams at home, some women don't do them at all, and I often times get questions from women, asking simply, 'How do I do an exam,'" Yitta said.

However soon, an experimental technology could help thousands of women and doctors screen for breast cancer in a new way. It's called the iTBra.

"So you'll be putting that on, so it'll now be centered over you,"

Cyrcadia Health CEO Rob Royea says the patches can be worn inside any normal bra. He said, "It's a wearable device with a number of sensors that check what happens with your circadian patterns of heat change on your breast over time."

Roye says the heat changes correlate to the accelerated cell activity associated with breast tumors. The results are then processed using sophisticated algorithms and transmitted to a smartphone.

"You wear the device for a few hours, and that information is automatically communicated to your physician," Rob Royea, Cyrcadia Health

Because the system is heat based, developers believe it may also offer advantages for some women with denser breast tissue, which can be more difficult to image using traditional mammography.

"We believe we're tissue agnostic. Meaning that for all tissues we react about the same," Rob Royea from Cyrcadia Health said.

The clinical trial being conducted at El Camino Hospital will study the results on women wearing the device for different lengths of time. The goal is to produce accurate readings in roughly two hours, ultimately making the system more convenient for women to use.

"An ideal breast cancer screening test would catch the cancer when it's smaller and easier to treat," Sila Yitta, M.D., from El Camino Hospital said.

And whether it's a routine mammogram, or at home screening, cancer survivor Dian Gaxiola believes any investment in early detection, is worth the time.

"It's very valuable," cancer survivor Fulldian Gaxioloa said.

If the trial is successful, Cyrcadia Health hopes to have the iTBra on the market later this year.

Written and produced by Tim Didion
Map My News
Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Patient Hub
Scoop.it!

Are Apple HealthKit and Google Fit Ready to Revolutionize Healthcare?

Are Apple HealthKit and Google Fit Ready to Revolutionize Healthcare? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Despite the advancements in medical technologies, healthcare continues to pose all levels of challenges of complexity, affordability and accessibility worldwide. In contrast to healthcare access, mobile access is becoming almost omnipresent across the whole world. This provides a strong foundation for mHealth — the use of mobile communication for health services or achieving health outcomes. The traditional IT giants Apple and Google joined the race of the fast-growing mHealth with their own solutions.

Apple Health Vs Google Fit: What are they?
Apple released its iOS 8 with a mHealth app, called Health, to track, record and analyse your Health Data across a variety of metrics (fitness data, nutrition data, sleep patterns, cholesterol levels, heart rate etc.) with your iPhone. Users can customize their own health dashboard and create a digital “emergency medical card” with crucial health information for emergency health service providers.

To compete with Apple, Google also published its Fit app, which also centralizes health data through collecting information from third party apps via your Android device. Google Fit app uses smartphone’s built-in sensors and can connect to compatible third-party gadgets and services. Google Fit app also built into Android smart watches such as Samsung Gear Live and Motorola Moto 360 to track your activates on-the-go.

What apps will support them?
In order to achieve talent worldwide, both Apple and Google open their health platform to developers. HealthKit is Apple’s tool for iOS developers to access and share your health data between apps. Some of the best health and fitness apps such as Jawbone’s UP app, Strava, MapMyRUN, WebMD etc. have already integrated with HealthKit. It’s important to note that Apple also enhance the partnerships with traditional health service providers such as NHS in the UK and hospitals in the USA to enter into health industry.

Google introduce its Fit SDK to its Android developer back in June 2014. Google Fit is an open platform allows third-party developers and devices manufacturers to connect and share health and fitness data. Apps and devices support Google Fit includes Withings, Runkeeper, Strava and Noom Coach etc. Google Fit attracts some large industry partners such as Adidas, HTC, Intel and Motorola.


Future and Concerns

Both Apple and Google describe their new Health/Fit platform as “the beginning of a health revolution”. With the ability to connect to wearable devices, HealthKit and Google can capture data such as blood pressure, oxygen saturation and hydration levels etc., which are normally associated with health professionals. For example, Google is currently working on a smart contact lens that can measure real-time glucose levels.

With all the information collecting from the apps and gadgets about our state of health, it is quiet possible in the near future our phone will know we are unwell before ourselves. This may completely change the old patient pathway where we feel sick, see a doctor, get tests and receive the results. The new patient pathway will be completely different: since our phones constantly track our medical results, they can help us to book medical appointments automatically. As health information grows more digitized, it could lead to time saving and efficiencies of the whole health system and help the society move towards the more cost-effective “preventative medicine”.


However, the promising Health/Fit technology also draws concerns from healthcare experts and public regarding data security, privacy and regulation. If all the personal medical records stored on smartphones and cloud, who owns the data has to be considered. Both Apple and Google haven’t clearly demonstrated how they are going to protect confidential health data from commercial abuse. There is also a risk that people will misinterpret their own health data and even develop unhealthy anxiety over less than perfect dataset.

Tech giants as Apple and Google may visualize the future of healthcare in the form of mHelath, but all the significant barriers need to be overcome and strategic collaborations and partnerships with all stakeholders, including healthcare providers and government, need to be built to deliver an effective, accessible mHealth system.

Follow us on Twitter: @TouchApp_uk


Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not?

Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
I think it’s fair to say that digital health is warming up. And not just in one area.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Healthy Children is a useful app for parents

Healthy Children is a useful app for parents | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The Healthy Children app provides the AAP’s popular patient and parent site in mobile app form. The post Healthy Children is a useful app for parents appeared first on iMedicalApps.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Healthstartup.eu
Scoop.it!

Scientists are trying to model our mental health based on our tweets

Scientists are trying to model our mental health based on our tweets | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

During the holiday season, ideally filled with family, food, and festivities, the topic of depression is often sidelined; even more of a taboo subject than usual. But research suggests it is one of our most persistent blights, ranked ninth in the world behind the major killers, such as heart disease, stroke, and HIV, according to Nature.

 

Now researchers from multiple disciplines, in both the public and private sectors, are working on various algorithms and approaches to measure a range of mental health trends via large volumes of online activity. Issues such as depression and seasonal anxiety disorder aren’t the first health trends to be investigated in this way – think Google Flu Trends, for instance – but they represent an entry point for researchers, one that most recently has been hailed by a team at Johns Hopkins reporting on techniques that could play a key role in measuring mental health metrics.

 

 


Via Alex Butler, Bart Collet
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Santé numérique
Scoop.it!

Ebola, Twitter, and misinformation: a dangerous combination?

Ebola, Twitter, and misinformation: a dangerous combination? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

#The recent Ebola outbreak in west Africa has affected countries deeply in need of foreign aid.1 People desperately need correct information on how to prevent and treat Ebola. Despite the poverty, the increasing spread of computers, tablets, and smartphones in the region creates an opportunity for the rapid dissemination of information through the internet and social media, but there is no guarantee that this information is correct. After reports that misinformation spread by text messages led to deaths,2 3 we checked the quality of Ebola related information on Twitter.

We used the Twitter search engine to collect all tweets in English with the terms “Ebola” and “prevention” or “cure” from Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria during 1 to 7 September 2014. We grouped them into medically correct information, medical misinformation, and other (including tweets of a spiritual nature). Most tweets and retweets contained misinformation, and misinformation had a much larger potential reach than correct information (table⇓).

The most common misinformation was that Ebola might be cured by the plant ewedu or by blood transfusion (unqualified—not just from Ebola survivors). Drinking and washing in salty water were also mentioned. Among these tweets, 248 (44%) were retweeted at least once; 95 of these contained scientifically correct information (38.3%), whereas 146 contained medical misinformation (58.9%; P<0.001). Two of these tweets—“Take ewedu daily to prevent and cure Ebola LUTH doctor urges Nigerians” and “Herbal healers’ claim to cure Ebola false”—were retweeted 23 and 24 times, respectively.

While most erroneous tweets were left undisputed, in some cases they were corrected by a Nigerian government agency and this correction spread on Twitter three days later. Public health and government agencies in west Africa should use Twitter to spread correct information and amend misinformation on how to deal with this emergency.


Via Plus91, Denis Granger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

2014's Most Popular Medical Stories About The Future of Medicine

2014's Most Popular Medical Stories About The Future of Medicine | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Here are the most important and interesting news and announcements about the future of healthcare & medicine in 2014 month by month. I hope you will enjoy looking back in time. January 20 Predi...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Healthcare dominates Google's venture investments in 2014

Healthcare dominates Google's venture investments in 2014 | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Healthcare accounted for 36 percent of Google Venture investments in 2014 in 12 companies spanning diagnostics, predictive analytics, telemedicine.
more...
Carrie Yeager's curator insight, December 28, 2014 9:59 PM

Healthcare offered via the Internet is gaining momentum.

Rescooped by dbtmobile from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
Scoop.it!

Disruptors in Medtech Should Not Ignore Compliance | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

Disruptors in Medtech Should Not Ignore Compliance | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The $3 trillion healthcare market has its lure.

By last year, 24 of the Fortune 50 companies had elbowed their way through healthcare’s front door. 

Built around new, disruptive technologies, many new entrants are focused on the device side of the business. However, these new entrants must not overlook one critical element during the development cycle: the web of compliance requirements threaded throughout healthcare.

So far these nontraditional healthcare companies developing medical products have primarily focused on innovative technology. The examples are numerous - Apple has launched a mobile health product capable of monitoring heart rate, Verizon introduced healthcare IT solutions connecting clinicians to their patients, and AT&T has launched mHealth, a platform for mobile application development.

However, as companies venture into deeper waters, they must become fluent in the alphabet soup of government regulatory bodies and industry standards entities that enforce compliance requirements in multiple phases of the product lifecycle. The AMA (American Medical Association); CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services); FDA (Food and Drug Administration); as well as HHS’s OIG (Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General) all have roles in R&D, development, launch and commercialization.

The laws and standards these entities enforce impact nearly all operations of the medtech industry, including commercial practices, development, medical affairs, testing, manufacturing, documentation, billing, reimbursement, risk assessment, traceability, practice ethics, patient rights, referral laws, interactions with doctors and government officials and more.

For companies whose core business is not heavily regulated, developing the infrastructure and culture of compliance can be especially daunting. But failing to proactively plan for and develop a compliance program doesn’t simply risk a company’s entrance into the healthcare space; it can jeopardize a new entrant’s larger organization if liabilities arise that can affect other business units.

Pause, if you will, before that dizzying array of rules and regs, but recognize that, somewhere out there, a potential competitor is already moving along the compliance pathway. Analysis of government filings by PwC’s Health Research Institute identified 24 digital health devices that were cleared by the FDA in just the first 10 months of 2014. So sitting back is no solution  if you are committed to providing better offerings.

What should a new entrant do as it develops new products?

Factor compliance risks into business structureMake sure the compliance organization is scalable andKnow the universe of risks and regulations.

Factor compliance risks into business structure when developing a medical entity
We recommend both legal and physical separation of a medical business from non-medical lines through the creation of a separate business unit. This structure limits the exposure for nonhealthcare business units to healthcare-specific compliance risks.

Consider the case where the company is using the same manufacturing facility to manufacture medical as well as nonmedical products. In a worst-case scenario of noncompliance, were a regulatory agency to shut down a facility’s manufacturing, both medical and non-medical business housed there would be impacted.

In addition to minimizing risk, separation can protect nonmedical business lines by helping streamline operations and simplifying compliance requirements. For example, the separation of medical and nonmedical businesses makes it possible for healthcare-specific training to be mandated only for those working on medical products, instead of forcing the entire corporation through a training program regardless of an employee’s involvement with medical products. Other similar efficiencies may also be found in areas of R&D, manufacturing, sales and marketing.

Make sure your compliance structure is scalable, and comes with a robust oversight mechanism
A robust compliance organization is the single most important mechanism to manage compliance risks. Further, that organization must be scalable beyond the initial, startup nature of the business. Importantly, those growth needs must be considered at early phases of development.

One of the most effective compliance organization structures in PwC’s experience has a single executive in charge of compliance requirements reporting directly to the head of the medical business unit. This supports operational simplicity while outlining clear roles and responsibilities at the executive level.

This also provides an independent, internal evaluation of potential risk issues and minimizes conflicts of interest that could come from reporting to other departments. In this way, potential compliance issues can be raised to the proper level, and receive the proper attention, without being unduly influenced by financial or other business metrics.

Know the universe of risks and regulations applicable to your health business
New entrants need to thoroughly analyze applicable compliance risks and regulations. Some compliance requirements depend on product complexity while others depend on the target customer.

Here is a list of industry compliance standards and regulatory guidance that is a great place to start in order to develop a best-fit risk control framework:

AMA Code of Medical Ethics Opinion 8.061 – Gifts to Physicians from IndustryAdvaMed Code of Ethics on Interactions with Healthcare Professionals (revised 2009)Enforcement Lessons: Settlement AgreementsFederal Sentencing Guidelines Chapter 8 Organizational Guidelines (revised 2004, 2010)HHS’s OIG Compliance Program Guidance for Medical Device ManufacturersOther HHS OIG Guidance: OIG WorkPlan, Advisory Opinions, Fraud & Alert BulletinsSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002; and21 CFR Regulations: Part 11, 803, 806, & 820.

There are real ramifications of noncompliance.  A failure in this regard can result in millions of dollars of direct losses as well as significant collateral damage to the company. Noncompliance may also impact timeline for launching products, even costing companies their first-mover advantage.

At the end of the day, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to address all compliance challenges. Each company needs to determine what is best for them, grounding that decision on factors such as operational size, risk exposure and the type of products they will be introducing into the market.

The good news is that with the proper business structure, a scalable compliance organization, and knowledge of the risk landscape, compliance need not throttle a company’s innovation pipeline. Indeed, compliance protects the company, prevents destructive risk, and can provide competitive advantages.

--By James S. Varelis, Principal, PwC Health Industries, Pharmaceutical & Life Sciences sector

 


Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Reports: Mobile Apps Capture Most Internet Time, Exceed TV

Reports: Mobile Apps Capture Most Internet Time, Exceed TV | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Mobile is the top attention medium in the US. That's been confirmed by Flurry, Nielsen, ad network InMobi and once again by comScore, which affirmed to Int
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Consumer Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Why We’re Getting Patient Engagement Backwards | The Health Care Blog

Why We’re Getting Patient Engagement Backwards | The Health Care Blog | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
There’s a mantra in healthcare right now to “drive patient engagement.” The idea is that informed and engaged patients play a crucial role in improving the quality of care our health system delivers. With the right information, these healthcare consumers will be more active participants in their care, select providers based on quality and value metrics, demand appropriate, high-quality, high-value services and choose treatment options wisely after a thorough process of shared decision-making.

This drive for patient engagement often fails to recognize one important truth: Our healthcare system inadvertently, yet potently, discourages engagement. It ignores the fact that the patient is already the most engaged person in healthcare. The patient bears the disease, the pain, the scar – and, ultimately, the bill. In our search for greater engagement, we must realize what the comic strip Pogo said years ago – “we have met the enemy, and he is us.”

As physicians, we expect patients to bring test results to an appointment – because patient information is often not shared throughout our complex and fragmented systems. We expect patients to remember their entire health history, and repeat it ad nauseum as our unconnected systems fail to share. We ask them to recount the complex names of the all the drugs they are taking – and at what doses. And it’s not uncommon for these questions to be asked many times in a single hospitalization, during outpatient visits, and again each time a patient encounters a new caregiver.

The reality is that patients have no choice but to be engaged. They are provided these details in an inefficient way that causes a lot of frustration, worry and fear on top of already stressful medical concerns. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reports that one in three patients experience gaps in information exchange, which we rely on the patient to solve. I suspect this number is a significant underestimate because we are so used to this level of fragmentation and repetition, that we no longer see it for the system failure it is.

We need to think less about the patient being more engaged, and focus on how we can simplify, encourage and automate engagement tools on behalf of the patient.

People are accustomed to integrated, automated, 24-hour customer service in almost every other industry. How does Netflix know what type of movies you like? By analyzing your watch list and ratings against millions of other records in its database. How does Amazon know what you want to buy – sometimes even before you do? By looking at your purchase history and known interests to predict your next purchase. A growing list of best-in-class retailers remember our preferences, our home address and our personal details – and they are only selling us STUFF.

Yet, when it comes to our most important asset – our health – the consumer experience is dependent on fax machines, scribbled notes, hand-carried print-outs and the memories of those most in need of care. If our healthcare system were to implement the automation, connection and coordination that other industries have used to change the face of consumer engagement, boosting patient engagement wouldn’t be an issue. We would instead be easing the burdens on the very patients we are trying to help.

Patients and their families are desperate for improved interactions and engagement tools. A recent story detailed how concerned parents – who were also engineers – figured out how to hack into their diabetic children’s glucose monitors so they could remotely track their blood sugar levels. Should something so essential to managing a loved ones’ health require it to be hacked to make that data accessible?

There are no technological reasons why these medical devices don’t share data, why hospital pricing is so opaque and why electronic medical records don’t share information automatically with all of a patient’s providers. In fact, the hurdles blocking the path to a more seamless, welcoming and user-friendly healthcare system are old habits, proprietary business models and a lack of patient-centered care.

We have to improve how our healthcare system engages with patients by getting the various technologies used to take care of people talking to each other. Additionally, we need to provide transparent pricing information or we won’t succeed in delivering better individual care, managing population health or lowering costs.

Effective patient engagement shouldn’t require patients to bear the burden of remembering all of their previous treatments or creating their own healthcare innovations to access their patient data. An automated, connected and coordinated system is needed before we can reap the benefits of effective patient engagement. Until we have such a model, we’re simply asking consumers to take too much responsibility for transforming a broken healthcare system they didn’t create – a system that should be serving them, not the other way around.

Joseph Smith, MD. PhD (@JoeSmithMD), a cardiologist, cardiac electrophysiologist and engineer, is chief medical and science officer of theGary and Mary West Health Institute (@WestHealth), an independent, nonprofit medical research organization that works with healthcare providers and research institutions to create new, more effective ways of delivering care.


Via Technical Dr. Inc., Beeyond
more...
Keith McGuinness's curator insight, January 18, 3:26 PM

Add in the potential of emerging digital therapeutics (aka health apps) to help prevent and manage chronic disease.  These tools of precarious potential are being developed as consumer products near the event horizon of the black hole we call health care.  Stay tuned.

Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

How To Track Your Life With Apple Health

How To Track Your Life With Apple Health | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
How To Track Your Life With Apple Health14,2363David NieldProfileFollowDavid NieldFiled to: Apple HealthiOS Tuesday 11:30amShare to KinjaShare to FacebookShare to TwitterGo to permalink

Expand

We've already taken a look at some of the features and capabilities of Google Fit, and Apple's own activity-tracking platform is now up and running too. Find out how you can use Apple's brand new app to monitor your daily exercise, improve your overall health, aggregate data from different sources and store your medical information.

The Apple Health app appears in iOS 8 on the iPhone 4s or later and the fifth generation iPod Touch. It will use the data automatically pulled from the sensors in your phone to try and build up a picture of your activity and your habits, but you can plug in third-party devices and services as well: Endomondo, Runtastic, Garmin Connect, Nutrino, Qardio and dozens of others all plug into Health and the underlying HealthKit platform in some way (though there are some big name holdouts).

Automatic monitoring

Expand

Open up the Health app on a new iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus and you'll see that steps, distance covered and flights climbed are all being tracked for you courtesy of the M8 motion coprocessor built into the device. If you've hooked up Health with some other apps and data sources, you can also see statistics on calories burned, weight, heart rate and just about everything else here.

The Day, Week, Month and Year buttons at the top of the screen let you see your data over a shorter or longer period of time. Tap on any chart for a more detailed breakdown; the subsequent screen lets you show or hide graphs on the main dashboard, add data points manually, and choose which data is included in the overview. Follow the Show All Data link and you can see exactly what information was recorded when.

Apple Health records so much information that you're probably going to want to limit the number of graphs that are shown on the dashboard and focus solely on the statistics that are most important to you. It's possible to dig down into any of the other screens at any time, if you need to, though checking up on your progress over time isn't particularly easy to do.

Health Data

Expand

Tap the Health Data icon at the foot of the interface to reveal all of the different types of information that Apple's app can keep track of. This covers a wide range of data points, from your date of birth to the number of times you've fallen over. In each case data can be added manually or fed through a connected app or gadget. If you're looking for something in particular, make use of the search field at the top.

For example, tap Sleep and then Sleep Analysis to see how much shut-eye you're getting at the moment. If you haven't connected anything that's able to measure this data automatically, you can log the time you've spent asleep and in bed manually: Select Add Data Point and fill in the relevant details. Toggle the Share on Dashboard button to add the chart to your overview screen.

The other sections in Health Data work along similar lines, though of course in the long-term you want to be piping this information in automatically rather than constantly typing out everything that's happening. The number of apps compatible with Health and HealthKit is growing, though—take Instant Heart Rate, for example, for measuring your heart rate with your phone's camera, or 7 Minute Workout for giving you a motivational prod.

Third-party services

Expand

Install an app that works with Health—such as the aforementioned Instant Heart Rate—and somewhere in the app will be an option to share the data it collects with Apple's framework. With this feature activated you should see data begin to be collated: Tap through into the type of data on the Health Data screen to see the information that has been logged and by which app.

All of these apps will work slightly differently, which is why Apple Health has so much potential in terms of being the central focal point for data coming in from multiple sensors and apps. Some apps will send data to Health, some will take data from it, and some will do both. Check the help information supplied with the app involved if you're not sure.

Jawbone's UP app is one of the more high-profile ones to introduce Health compatibility, and it can both read from and write to the Health app. Essentially, that means you can use your UP wristband with Apple Health, or try out the UP app without a wearable using the data pulled from Health and your iPhone's sensors. To see all of your connected apps in one place, go into Health and tap the Sources button: From the list of entries you can manage which sorts of data are shared (Sleep Analysis and Steps in the case of the UP app) and in which direction.

Your Medical ID

Expand

The last section in the Health app is Medical ID and it's here that you can store vital information such as allergies and your organ donor status. Choose to Create Medical ID from the front screen and you can enter details of medical conditions, your age, height and weight, any medications you're currently taking, your blood type and an emergency contact who can be called in the case of an emergency.

It's in an emergency where this Medical ID could be the most useful. You'll notice a Show When Locked toggle switch at the top of the screen, and when this is switched on a link to your ID will appear on your device's lock screen. Whoever picks up your phone can tap on the Emergency button then the Medical ID one to find all of the information that you've left. If you'd rather it was kept hidden, disable the feature.

Apple Health still has a long way to go. Some better data analysis would be welcome, for example, and there's no easy way to go back through your statistics, but it's a confident start and one that's currently more comprehensive than Google's comparable offering. If you're an iPhone user then it's automatic monitoring capabilities might just be enough to get you to take your health more seriously.


Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from M-HEALTH By PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

mHealth Device | Eliminate Annual Checkup, Improve Research | HealthWorks Collective

mHealth Device | Eliminate Annual Checkup, Improve Research | HealthWorks Collective | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Imagine you're a 30-year-old who eats healthily, exercises regularly, doesn’t use tobacco products or drink excessive amounts of alcohol, and has an unremarkable family medical history. You visit your regular physician for an annual checkup, and after a quick 15-minute chat with your doctor he schedules you for blood work and says to come back in two or three years unless the blood panel shows a problem or an illness appears. You likely don’t feel well cared for or very informed, do you?

You’re not alone in feeling that way. Any good nutritionist, trainer or counselor knows that preventive health care can't adequately be done in one 15-minute session per year, yet this scenario has been the standard of physician-patient interaction for decades and has caused growing disconnect among doctors and their patients. But technology is narrowing that gap. The idea of “modern medicine” is being revolutionized thanks to unprecedented amounts of data flowing from mobile health care devices (mHealth). Soon the concept of quick annual checkups will become obsolete, and doctors are going to be more frequently involved in their patients’ lives in inventive and intimate ways—resulting in a new era of understanding about disease management and prevention.

One of the biggest changes the health care industry faces is the increase of consumer available tests and data, which means people are becoming familiar with the kinds of things physicians look at during annual visits and more preventative tests can be done from home, says Dr. William Rusnak, a family medicine resident in Philadelphia.

This greater access means patients won’t need to visit the clinic for routine testing.

“My hope is that an annual check-up turns into more a quarterly checkup, and that can be a reality if the convenience is available,” Rusnak says. “Obviously people aren't going to take off time from work and schedule an appointment physically see a physician that often, so I see this happening in terms of mHealth.”

More frequent patient-physician interactions for at-risk patients can increase the likelihood of detecting early signs of cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, heart disease, strokes, diabetes and Alzheimer’s, which are among the leading causes of deaths for Americans. The current method of screening for these ailments every few years leaves patients vulnerable to missing red flags and putting them behind the curve on preventative care, Rusnak says. And although home health monitoring is off to a slow start, mHealth tools are increasing in popularity and providing medical teams with new resources to manage and prevent these illnesses—resources which will eventually curb the contraction and mortality growth rates.

Politics, financial costs and shady data security methods means telemedicine and mHealth in their current form won’t entirely replace physical checkups, but digital visits are already transforming the type of health care patients receive — soon seeing your doctor only once every year or three will phase out completely.

Getting useful, consumer-friendly medical devices into the hands of patients and having physicians engaging with patients who use those tools is the first step. But this change is going to be a result of examining the types of data and information coming in from mobile health systems, which are providing way more information than researchers have ever had before and delivering insights to the ways diseases progress and the optimal ways to manage them, says Euan Thomson, the CEO of AliveCor, a mobile echocardiogram manufacturer and heart disease research company.

“The nature of the way that we understand and track diseases is going to change significantly. That's one of the main drivers [of mHealth], because data is going to give us better care and better insights than ever before,” Thomson says. “Not just through the logistics of telemedicine, but through a greater understanding of the disease process itself.”

This data is going to allow for more specialized care, and offer patients improved understanding of their chronic illness and how to manage it. In upcoming years, when patients establish care at a medical practice they're going to be working with entire teams, and depending on their individual needs they will spend more or less time with particular members of the team. For example, a diabetic needs more medical, dietary, and even podiatry care than a healthy teenager who likely requires more emotional counseling, personal development coaching, and fitness guidance. Medicine is going to become much more individualized, and that personalization is going to increase exponentially as more convenient, reliable mHealth devices enter the marketplace. 

But the replacement of irregular checkups goes further than wearing personal health care devices and having doctors use the results. The expansion that is going to happen the most because of these new telemedicine technologies is in rural areas where doctors will be able to do consulting from a health care center to a physician's office, monitor chronic diseases, and more slowly for psychiatric and therapeutic sessions, says Dr. Janis Orlowski, the chief health care officer at the Association of American Medical Colleges.

“Telemedicine has really been the promise for the last 10 or 15 years that has really never quite met its greatest potential, and I think that's because it was limited by technology, but those limitations are slowly falling away,” she says.

However, despite the proposed benefits of telemedicine and mobile health care various organizations, like the American Medical Association, urge caution when physicians begin implementing mobile devices into their treatment plan.

The AMA recommends doctors establish a physician-patient relationship prior to any telemedicine interaction taking place, with certain exemptions for specialties like pathology, radiology and urgent care situations where a face-to-face interaction is not fundamental in the standard of care. Physicians need to see their patients face-to-face in order to gather the background information necessary to make educated health care decisions and provide good care. Once that initial relationship is established, the AMA recommends that physicians use any mode of technology they choose so long as the technology allows them to meet the standard of care for whatever service they are providing.

Unlike Rusnak and Thomson, the AMA doesn’t foresee regular physician exams completely disappearing, but they’ll take on a different role than what’s currently practiced. The organization argues annual visits will become a critical summary between the patient and physician, where additional background information about the patient’s health over the course of the year is provided. This gives the patient quantifiable data and goals for the upcoming year.

mhealth / shutterstock


Via Celine Sportisse, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Salud Conectada
Scoop.it!

The Future of Diabetes Management: 8 Reasons Why We Face Extraordinary Times!

The Future of Diabetes Management: 8 Reasons Why We Face Extraordinary Times! | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The Future of Diabetes Management: 8 Reasons Why We Face Extraordinary Times!by Dr. Bertalan Meskó on January 28, 2015

Around 400 million patients have diabetes worldwide according to estimations. And over the last few years, diabetes management has been improving but due to the new technologies and devices coming to the market very soon, the whole management of diabetes will significantly change in the coming years. Let me show you some examples how.

Digital Contact Lenses

Google has an augmented reality glass called the Google Glass which they just stopped developing, but they also patented a digital contact lens through which we can get more information from the digital world plus it can measure blood glucose levels from tears as an added benefit. Google launched a partnership with the pharmaceutical company Novartis to develop these smart contact lenses that can track diabetes and fix farsightedness as well.

Gamification

There are amazing applications for smartphones that can help you manage diabetes efficiently. MySugr, an Austrian company, released several applications that can add a little bit of gamification to the traditional diabetes management apps. The company also developed the mySugr Junior App designed for kids to learn how to manage diabetes properly. It also enables parents to keep control over the therapy when they are not around the kid. The app looks like a game in which the children get points for every entry and the goal is to score a particular amount of points every single day.

Patient empowerment with big data

Databetes helps patients better manage their diabetes by providing a good way for logging and measuring data, as well as a revolutionary concept to analyze the big data behind one person’s disease. Patients can support each other through social media channels and become coaches for each other. Look at sixuntilme.com for best practice examples.

Bionic pancreas

There is artificial pancreas which means that it’s a closed-loop insulin delivery system. The device can measure blood glucose levels constantly and decide upon the insulin delivery itself. Engineers from Boston University have developed a bionic pancreas system that uses continuous glucose monitoring along with subcutaneous delivery of both rapid-acting insulin and glucagon as directed by a computer algorithm.

Food scanners

TellSpec, a Canadian company is coming up with a food scanner this year which by scanning your food can tell you how many and what kind of ingredients, how many allergens, toxins, how many carbohydrates you actually have in the food you are about to eat.

Pocket-sized gadgets

When you live with diabetes, you get used to carting around with plenty of things such as meters, test strips, lancing devices, and so on therefore a pocket-sized gadget can change this called Dario that also comes with a diabetes management system.

Wireless monitors

The medical company Abbott just released a FreeStyle Libre system which makes it possible to constantly measure blood glucose levels in a wireless way.

Digital tattoos

Here is a digital tattoo that can measure glucose levels by using electric current to attract glucose to the surface of the skin. The proof-of-concept study was just published and it’s time to bring the era of wireless diabetes management to patients.

So there are more and more technologies that can help people manage diabetes properly besides potentially future therapies such as new drugs or islet cell transplantation but it’s really time to manage diabetes in a gamified and comfortable way and I believe that the best gadgets and the best technological solutions are just yet to come.

Please share your experience and thoughts on this!


Via Usalbiomedica, ChemaCepeda
more...
ChemaCepeda's curator insight, January 30, 11:57 AM

Avances e innovación en diabetes para a desarrollar durante el 2015

Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content

Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Quick reference apps are great, but only when their content is up to date. The post Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content appeared first on iMedicalApps.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

How Cloud Computing is Changing the Health Care...

How Cloud Computing is Changing the Health Care... | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The accelerating migration to cloud computing represents a change for the way the healthcare industry sources its health information technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Systèmes d'information Santé
Scoop.it!

Big-Data in Health Care: Patient data analyses has great potential

Big-Data potential in Health care and daily practical work of doctors, nurses and health care professionals. Through self tracking, social media & text analysi…

Via Plus91, Chanfimao, Alain Codaccioni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Social Media, TIC y Salud
Scoop.it!

Oncologist use of Digital in Q2 2014 [Infographic]

Oncologist use of Digital in Q2 2014 [Infographic] | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
[fullwidth_text alt_background=none width=1/1...

Via Mathieu Vaidis, eMedToday, Usalbiomedica
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Happy New Year and thanks for an amazing 2014! - Blog - Healthy Startups - Storytelling for health innovation

Happy New Year and thanks for an amazing 2014! - Blog - Healthy Startups - Storytelling for health innovation | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Jason Berek-Lewis Founder @ Healthy Startups What an amazing year! 2014 has been the ul...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app

Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A great evidenced based medical app that helps you perform various MSK exams effectively The post Review of UCSF’s musculoskeletal medical exam app appeared first on iMedicalApps.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Innovation, Big Data, Open Data, Internet of Things, Smart Homes & Cities, 3D printing
Scoop.it!

Why Virtual Reality Doesn't Need a Killer App to Get Huge | WIRED

Why Virtual Reality Doesn't Need a Killer App to Get Huge | WIRED | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

On a frosty December morning in 1783, some 400,000 people gathered in the Tuileries Gardens in Paris to see the world’s first manned flight in a hydrogen balloon. Jacques Charles and his assistant, Nicolas-Louis Robert, ascended 1,800 feet into the sky accompanied by a mercury barometer, some sandbags, and a few bottles of champagne.

“Nothing will ever quite equal that moment of total hilarity that filled my whole body at the moment of take-off,” Charles later wrote. “I felt we were flying away from the Earth and all its troubles for ever.”

Back on the ground, feelings were more ambivalent. Benjamin Franklin, then the American ambassador to France, watched the scene from his carriage. A cynical companion remarked, “What’s the use of a balloon?” Franklin, aghast, replied, “What’s the use of a newborn baby?”

His point: You’re not thinking big enough.

When Joseph Banks, then the president of England’s Royal Society, first got word in a letter from Franklin about the balloons, he too demanded to know their practical applications. There were some obvious implementations—geographical mapping and military reconnaissance sprung first to mind—but he questioned whether ballooning could otherwise “prove beneficial either to society or science.” Banks proposed one such practical use-case: a system using balloons to reduce the load on horse-pulled wagons. The idea was that broad-wheeled wagons, which normally would require eight horses to draw, would need just two using such a method.

Franklin, with a bit more foresight, argued ballooning could “pave the way to some discoveries in Natural Philosophy of which at present we have no conception.” He compared ballooning to “magnetism and electricity, of which the first experiments were mere matters of amusement.”

The Small Thinking That Plagued Ballooning Also Plagues VR

Like those hydrogen balloons, small thinking has plagued the development of one of today’s flashiest technologies, virtual reality devices. When Oculus, the company that (literally) kickstarted the new VR revolution, originally pitched its device as a “headset designed specifically for video games that will change the way you think about gaming forever,” hardly anyone—least of all gamers—questioned the idea that VR should be anything other than a high-end gaming accessory. Like a new graphics card or a better TV, it would be a logical, utilitarian improvement to current display technology for games—a horse-drawn carriage, now improved with balloons.

We’ve had a few years to get used to the idea of VR, and some have started getting a little more high-minded about its possibilities. WIRED has been eager to lead the charge, as when it declared a few months ago that VR will “change gaming, movies, TV, music, design, medicine, sex, sports, art, travel, social networking, education, and reality.” Of course, it always has been the tendency of magazines to breathlessly celebrate new technologies. In a 1788 article, Gentleman’s Magazine (the first periodical to use the word “magazine” to describe itself) celebrated the advent of hydrogen ballooning as “the most magnificent and astonishing discovery that has been made for many ages, or perhaps since the creation.” Time, Gentleman’s Magazine assured its readers, would reveal the utility of ballooning experiments.

Now, though, even the most breathlessly optimistic VR fanboys can’t help but ask: What will be “the killer app” for these new devices? (Palmer Luckey’s Franklin-esque response? “What’s the real world’s killer app?”)


Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Update: In 2015, interesting digital health collaborations on tap for pharma

Qualcomm LIfe General Manager Rick Valencia said we'll see a lot more collaboration between pharma companies next year as integrate digital health solutions.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Salud Conectada
Scoop.it!

CellScope’s iPhone-enabled otoscope, remote consultation service launches for CA parents

CellScope’s iPhone-enabled otoscope, remote consultation service launches for CA parents | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Parents in California who have children who get chronic ear infections will soon have a more convenient way to get their kids care.

San Francisco-based CellScope, a Khosla Ventures-backed Rock Health alum, has begun taking preorders for its FDA registered smartphone-enabled otoscope, called Oto Home.

Via ChemaCepeda
more...
ChemaCepeda's curator insight, December 18, 2014 6:16 AM

Otoscopios para padres conectados  con el profesional vía telemedicina ¿qué os parece la idea?

Rescooped by dbtmobile from 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world

Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The social media landscape is constantly evolving. Given the strong interest and comments received from our members, we have published an updated version of the map.

The proliferation of small and large communities is the result ofphysicians’ increasing need to share ideas and discuss clinical cases with colleagues in every part of the world. 
The analysis highlights a very complex social landscape, with a very strong community presence in the US, but also a significant presence of more or less large local communities almost worldwide.

The more the number of communities grow, the greater the need to create stronger niche communities, increasingly unfolding the landascape of physician communities. Trying to find some differentiating features in theaggregation trend of physician communities, we have identified 3 main features:

SpecialtyLocationTrustworthy Provider


Specialized communities

“Specialized” communities tend to be a smaller group and represent the long tail of physician communities, with a small but very specialized number of subscribers. In this type of aggregation the common feature is the professional specialty and consequently a common specific area of interest. In the radiology field, for example, there are many examples of specialized communities like Radrounds.com or Radiopolis.com.

Location specific communities

Location specific communities usually represent an aggregation of physicians that come from thesame country or speak the same language.

These kinds of communities are generally larger than the specialized ones, since they tend to include all physician specialities.

Usually physicians turn to location specific communities for two main reasons. The first is language, especially in Europe, where due to the multitude of different European languages, localized communities are proliferating quickly. The second is related to local roles and rules shared by physicians coming from the same country with regard to their medical or practice management issues.

Examples of localized communities are DocCheck in Germany and Doctors.net.uk in UK that represent the top European physician communities.

What is also interesting is the presence of physician communities in emerging markets. In China for example the dxy.cn community has 1,7 million members, of which 50% are physicians.

Trustworthy Provider based communities

The last (but not least) aggregation factor depends on the community provider's trustworthyness. Many physicians prefer to join communities related to scientific societies they belong to or trusted professional websites that they already consider relevant or reliable information sources. This explains the proliferation of physician communities within professional websites such as BMJ (doc2doc community) or related to medical association websites, such as CardioSource from the American College of Cardiology.

Usually these kinds of communities have a significant number of subscribers, largely also due to their existing physician databases.

The physician community landscape is continuously changing, but there is a trend towards growth of smaller communities, which are able to aggregate and keep active specialist interest groups. The true benchmark for measuring the quality and health of a community in this fragmented scenario will be to measure its social life - in order to understand how active each member really is, communicating, playing and sharing information and knowledge to create collective intelligence.


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, January 5, 5:44 AM

Physicians dedicated social networks raising up also in Europe....

Rescooped by dbtmobile from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
Scoop.it!

Doing Health Care Better Will Involve Using Data Better

Doing Health Care Better Will Involve Using Data Better | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Huge changes are ahead in healthcare. From the Affordable Care Act to new service models to advances in health and fitness technology, the field is definitely in a growth and change mode.

One critical dynamic involves what is known as “big data.” Unlike the smaller bits and pieces of information healthcare providers have always amassed on patients and outcomes, big data has the potential to aggregate the kinds of information that can be truly informative for all stakeholders: consumers, physicians, healthcare companies, and businesses.

Big data, which comes from collecting, processing, and organizing information requires web scraping software and technical savvy. Variously known as “data extraction” or “screen scraping,” it’s the kind of technology firms like Mozenda have been perfecting.

Mozenda and other data miners are basically transforming billions of bits into broad knowledge — or, as Mozenda CEO Brett Haskins describes it: “turning a mountain of data into moments of clarity.”

Many industries have already tapped into the wealth of information found in big data, but healthcare is just getting started. The potential gains in using big data are enormous — from access to the kind of patient case files that can define the healthcare needs of regions or demographic groups to statistics on which health or fitness apps are proving efficacious around the country.

Knowing more about what is really happening — and what is actually working — could create a whole new healthcare world.

The benefits of big data are becoming more obvious every day to the healthcare industry. Information, properly obtained, sorted, and analyzed with the latest extraction technologies, is the foundation upon which the future of healthcare will be built.

In a nutshell, doing health care better will involve using data better.


Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.