Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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BeBop's smart fabric puts sensors in everything you wear

BeBop's smart fabric puts sensors in everything you wear | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Wearable sensors don't tend to do much; they're usually limited to health data like EKG readings or your heart rate. If BeBop Sensors has its way, though, they'll be useful for just about anything that comes in contact with your body. Its new smart fabric sensor tracks virtually every aspect of physical presence, including bending, location, movement and pressure. As you might imagine, that opens the door to... well, quite a lot. You could have smart insoles that track both your pace and your running style, or baseball gloves that help perfect your swing; BeBop also sees uses in everything from wearable controllers to smart yoga mats that improve your poses. The company is only providing the basic technology, not finished products, so it'll be a while before you see this smart cloth in something you can buy. Even so, it's clear that there's a lot of potential -- you may always have a way to measure your activities without resorting to wristbands or other conspicuous gear.

 
Via TechinBiz, Bonnie Sandy, Adrian Adewunmi Ph.D, Philippe Marchal
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Bonnie Sandy's curator insight, October 29, 2014 9:01 PM

Whatever your niche or need BeBop's Smart Fabric makes Sensors  wearable and easy to adopt. At least that's the promise!

Generic Student's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:31 AM

This seems like it would have many ingenious uses.

Giselle Pempedjian's curator insight, October 31, 2014 2:09 AM

At last!!! That's cool!

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These Fascinating New Nanobots seek out & Destroy Cancerous Tumors

These Fascinating New Nanobots seek out & Destroy Cancerous Tumors | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Whether they're sneaking between cells or turning cockroaches into living 8-bit computers, nanobots are insanely fascinating. Now, they're about to become an army of impossibly small weaponized robots, swarm into the human body, hunt down malignant tumors and destroy them once and for all.

New research from the University of California's Davis Cancer Center published in Nature Communications has enabled doctors to develop a nanoparticle called "nanoporphyrin", which will both hunt down and destroy cancerous tumors within the human body. This was achieved by installing a tumor-recognition module in a nanobot, which would inject drugs directly into the affected cells.

Unlike standard chemotherapy, which simply blasts all of a certain type of cell and often ends up doing more damage than good, this new treatment leaves healthy cells completely unharmed.

Phys.org has an in-depth, technical explanation of how the system works, so head over and check it out. [Phys.org]

Top image: Shutterstock

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Advances in Sensor Technology & how it will help the Consumer

Advances in Sensor Technology & how it will help the Consumer | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Advances in Sensor Technology
A video about the advances in sensor technology
and the opportunities and challenges they will present to conusmers

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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 8, 2013 10:45 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables) The Financial Times has a chat with an analyst on the sensor technology helping to enable IoT & Wearables.  Short video.

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Verizon launches cloud for sharing data from patient remote monitoring devices

Verizon launches cloud for sharing data from patient remote monitoring devices | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Verizon's new Converged Health Management service can aggregate patient health data from from their homes or when traveling from a Web-based portal.


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Emergency workers scan QR codes to quickly access health information

Emergency workers scan QR codes to quickly access health information | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
QR codes are being used for more than just advertisements in Marin County, California. There, paramedics hope the stickers could help save lives in emergency situations.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, michel verstrepen, philippe porta
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mHealth: Are You Ready for Sensors in Healthcare?

mHealth: Are You Ready for Sensors in Healthcare? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The market for wearable sensors is increasing dramatically. Devices are being designed to help people manage chronic conditions, recover more quickly from injuries, analyze physical and environmental abnormalities that may lead to more serious health issues and detect unhealthy habits before they cause problems, according to Pathfinder Software. A new infographic from Pathfinder Software takes a look at the types of wearables available, how they are used, their wireless capability and other details on this technology. Thank you to Pathfinder Software for an educational Infographic. Also, thank you to the Healthcare Intelligence Network for having this Infographic on their site.


Via ET Russell, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, September 17, 2014 5:02 AM

Parece que los wearables (dispositivos vestibles), es la tecnología de moda ¿cómo chocará esta tecnología con la salud clásica?

Bouzid Menaa's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:28 AM

In collaboration with international renowned scientists, I am developing a new quantitative and qualitative  mobile device for bacterial surface detection and diagnostic tool

 

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Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your Wrist

Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your Wrist | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Apple's anticipated entry to the wearable devices market has taken on near-mythical status, with rumors reaching every corner of the technology map. AppleInsider has rounded up some of the technologies most likely to find their way into the still-unannounced "iWatch."



Materials



Sapphire


GT Advanced Technologies' ASF sapphire furnace.
Source: GT Advanced



Apple's interest: A $578 million deal with sapphire equipment maker GT Advanced Technologies to open and operate a massive commercial sapphire plant in Arizona.

Much has been made of Apple's agreement GT Advanced Technologies. Many believe the new jointly-operated facility in Arizona will produce display covers to replace the Gorilla Glass currently used in the iPhone and iPad; some think the crystals will be used in an iWatch, while still others believe that Apple simply needs more sapphire for its camera lenses and Touch ID housings.

If sapphire is to be used as a main component of an Apple device, the iWatch is its most likely target. High-end watch companies have long used sapphire to cover the faces of their timepieces because of its scratch resistance, but — as anyone who has dropped a sapphire-covered watch can attest — the material is prone to shattering, making it far better suited for a device that's constantly strapped to a person rather than hanging loosely in their hands.

Liquidmetal


A number of cast Liquidmetal casings for mobile phones | Source: Liquidmetal



Apple's interest: A $20 million contract for exclusive rights to use Liquidmetal in consumer electronics and a number of manufacturing patents related to the material. That agreement was re-upped through February 2015 earlier this week.

Liquidmetal is an amorphous alloys — essentially, metallic glass — that is much lighter, harder, and more flexible than metals traditionally used in electronics manufacturing. Parts made of Liquidmetal could "snap back" from deformations that might cause permanent bends or dents in other metals, such as Apple's omnipresent aluminum, and it's extremely scratch-resistant.

Liquidmetal is difficult to work with, however. Apple famously tested its viability by using it to make the SIM ejector tool included with the iPhone 3GS, but Liquidmetal's inventor predicted in 2012 that at least two to four years of further refinement in manufacturing processes was necessary before it could be commercially viable on a large scale.

Complicating Liquidmetal's possible appearance in Apple's iWatch is a deal with Switzerland's Swatch group that granted the horologists exclusive use of Liquidmetal in watches.

Displays



OLED


Samsung Mobile Display showing off a flexible display at CES 2011. Source: OLED-Display.net



Apple's interest: Apple has a number of OLED-related patents to its name, including dynamic brightness adjustment and improved power efficiency. The company also hired away a senior OLED researcher from LG Display.

OLED — or organic light-emitting diode — displays are a new type of display in which each pixel is made of an organic compound that emits light when electrical current is passed through it. Because of this design, OLED panels don't require a backlight, making them thinner and lighter than traditional LCD-based panels and adding the potential to be folded or curved.

While many Apple watchers previously expected the iWatch to ship with a more traditional LCD panel, the tide of opinion has shifted in recent months in favor of OLED. The inclusion of a flexible OLED would allow for a more form-fitting design in which the screen could curve with the contours of the wearer's wrist, rather than sitting flat on the top.

From the outside, Apple has long seemed apathetic toward OLEDs. Former CEO Steve Jobs is thought to have disliked the technology, and current chief Tim Cook panned OLED earlier this year, saying that the displays showed "awful" color saturation.

"If you ever buy anything online and really want to know what he color is, as many people do, you should really think twice before you depend on the color from an OLED display," he said.

Micro-LED


A similar micro LED array displayed by Taiwanese researchers

Apple's interest: Acquired micro-LED display maker LuxVue Technologies earlier this month for an unknown price.

Micro LEDs are essentially exactly what they sound like: very small LEDs. The technology that enables their miniaturization also plays a part in lowering power consumption and increasing brightness, with the combination placing micro LED arrays in direct competition with OLEDs.

This is a relatively new technology, however; Apple's acquisition of secretive LuxVue is likely to have given micro LEDs more exposure the day it was uncovered than the technology has received since its invention. Despite a number of high-profile backers — and their rumored inclusion in Google's next-generation Glass headset — micro LEDs have yet to find their way into shipping consumer device.

Still, there is reason to believe that Apple may have chosen the micro LED route. At least one of LuxVue's patents covers the manufacturing of a curved micro LED array, which could replace the flexible AMOLED display Apple is thought to have targeted.

Semiconductors





Apple has made a massive investment in semiconductor technology in recent years, and the iWatch is likely to put those advancements front-and-center. While the iPhone is a technologically impressive piece of kit, the iWatch would have to be a miniaturization tour de force in order to live up to the rumors surrounding its capabilities.

Apple began its semiconductor roadshow in 2008 with the purchase of P.A. Semi, a power-efficient fabless semiconductor design firm working on PowerPC-based chips. Later, in 2010, they purchased Intrinsity, an ARM-focused studio that is thought to have contributed to the development of the A-series processors.
Apple has spent nearly $1 billion on semiconductor technology firms — that we know of.
Last August, Apple acquired Passif Semiconductor, a company that develops ultra-low-power communications chips. The company has also been seen snapping up senior RF engineers from Broadcom, sparking rumors of a new in-house baseband team.

Finally, last November, Apple picked up Israeli firm PrimeSense for a rumored $360 million, pushing their total investment in semiconductor technology up toward $1 billion. Taken together, the sheer volum of chip design talent and intellectual property now in-house in Cupertino is staggering — any iWatch introduction is likely to bring along with it a similarly-impressive display of silicon engineering.

That probably, won't include noninvasive blood glucose monitoring or three-dimensional mapping, though. Apple is more likely to put its considerable resources to bear on more mundane, but still difficult tasks — like integrating an application processor, baseband, and wireless communications controller in a single, smaller, less power-hungry chip.


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♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, January 25, 2015 2:40 PM

The future is waiting for us

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Smartphones are Becoming the Hub of our Digital Lifestyles

Smartphones are Becoming the Hub of our Digital Lifestyles | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
In 2003 I began a series of lectures at conferences entitled “Three Screens of the Digital Lifestyle.” Starting in 2000 I began researching how people were using various screens in their lives and made the assumption that over the next 5-7 years...

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Imaging system can help diagnose disease, monitor hazardous substances

Imaging system can help diagnose disease, monitor hazardous substances | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
To meet demands for ever smaller imaging systems, researchers are working to create entirely unconventional ways of focusing light.

Via Ioannis, TechinBiz
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