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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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5 crowdfunded apps, devices for health tracking | mobihealthnews

5 crowdfunded apps, devices for health tracking | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Last month, we compiled a list of 9 companies that had new takes on self-tracking and were crowdfunding on Indiegogo. The list included Push, an armband that tracks force instead of just activity level, Angel, an open source activity tracker that lets the developer decide what the device should do, and TellSpec, a spectrometer-enabled food tracker.

Push passed its goal of $80,000 by $54,000 and Angel passed its goal of $100,000 by over $200,000, but besides Push, Angel and Tellspec, the rest of the companies on the last roundup did not reach their funding goals.

Since then, five other health products have been added to Indiegogo and Kickstarter. Many examples on this list also utilize different methods for health tracking and awareness, like a sensor that tracks sitting time instead of activity time and an algorithm that gets information from texting instead of an app to track nutrition.

ScanZ

ScanZ says it understands its user’s skin, and that it can answer the three questions everyone with a blemish asks. One, ‘when will it go away?’, two, ‘what should I do to make it go away faster’, and three, ‘if the user doesn’t have a pimple, will he or she break out?’ The system uses a device that scans the user’s face and a companion app that answers these questions for the user. Algorithms within the app are based off Mayo Clinic’s algorithms, which, ScanZ says, “mirror a dermatologist’s process of solving skin problems.” Users can track the progress of their blemishes on the app and also be prepared for what may happen in the future.

During the crowdfunding campaign, ScanZ is offering the device for $199, which is $50 off it


Via Cecile Chelim
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FDA clears Reflectance’s muscle oxygen saturation, tissue acidosis sensor | mobihealthnews

FDA clears Reflectance’s muscle oxygen saturation, tissue acidosis sensor | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

This month the FDA cleared Westborough, MA−based Reflectance Medical’s noninvasive, peel-and-stick sensor for measuring muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) and pH (pHm), an indicator of tissue acidosis. Reflectance’s Multi-Parameter Mobile CareGuide 3100, which simultaneously and continually measures those two parameters, secured Class II clearance. Quickly reversing acidosis can help prevent serious complications like organ failure and death. As a result the company aims to prevent costly ICU stays, too.

Notably, Reflectance spun out of the University of Massachusetts back in 2009.

Reflectance plans to bring its Mobile CareGuide 3100 to market thanks to partners Zoll Medical and Sotera Wireless. Those partnerships will focus on leveraging the monitor to improve care for trauma patients, but Reflectance also aims to ink deals with companies to help congestive heart failure patients, too. The company is also reportedly bringing its wares to the US military.

“For the first time, patient acid-base status can be assessed and monitored without the need for blood draws or invasive catheter,” Reflectance President and CEO Babs Soller stated in a press release. ”Reflectance has developed an Android app to begin to explore opportunities for CareGuide in clinics and patient homes.”


Via Cecile Chelim
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DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The biodegradable electronics are made using silicon and magnesium encased inside a silk layer. The qualities of the silk determine how long the system lasts before degrading, and since silicon and magnesium are both found in our bodies (in tiny quantities), DARPA assures that the technology shouldn't be harmful, whether it dissolves inside or outside the human body.


In medicine, dissolving electronics could be inserted into a wound before closing it up, and could monitor healing or apply heat to the damaged area to speed the process. Then, after a few weeks, the system would simply break apart, which would mean no second surgery to remove it and no more healing needed.


... dissolving electronics could mean a lot less e-waste, since your old phones, computers, toasters and what-have-you would biodegrade instead of sitting in a landfill. That, and instead of wearable electronics, why don't we just skip on over to embeddable bio-circuitry? Google Glass is fine to start, but I'm waiting for the disposable contact lens version.


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Edward Wang's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:28 AM

Reminds me of Stefanie's idea of compostable 3d printing.

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Emergency workers scan QR codes to quickly access health information

Emergency workers scan QR codes to quickly access health information | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
QR codes are being used for more than just advertisements in Marin County, California. There, paramedics hope the stickers could help save lives in emergency situations.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, michel verstrepen, philippe porta
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iSonea asthma monitor gets CE Mark, no FDA yet | mobihealthnews

iSonea asthma monitor gets CE Mark, no FDA yet | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Via Cecile Chelim
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David Dellamonica's curator insight, September 12, 2013 3:12 AM

A really good approcah.

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An intelligent framework for connecting the Internet of (medical) Things

An intelligent framework for connecting the Internet of (medical) Things | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Smart is the new cool, and if there’s any machine among the plethora of Internet-connected gadgets and systems available today that you’d want to be smart, it’s the one that’s monitoring or even sustaining your health.

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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.


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Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data

Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Put all this data in the cloud, (privacy not included) and personal medicine becomes a reality, tracking our mood, skin temperatures and the analysis of correlated data becomes a new picture we have of ourselves, and a new image we can project unto the world.

 

“They’re really external extensions of our mind,” said Joseph Tranquillo, associate professor of biomedical and electrical engineering at Bucknell University. (referring to all our networked devices- CNN)

 

So, vast amounts of data, self-tracking, personal information stock exchange, our own memories in the cloud, implants under our skins transmitting the data continuously.

 

by @Wildcat2030

 


Via Peter Vander Auwera, ddrrnt, Bart Collet
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Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:58 AM
Thanks Peter, glad you liked the article
Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:59 AM
Thanks for sharing this, glad you liked the article