Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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How mHealth tech is changing diabetes treatment

How mHealth tech is changing diabetes treatment | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Today's mobile apps are helping diabetics aggregate blood sugar and nutritional data from multiple platforms and devices and logging data into central portals accessible anywhere, according to Steve Robinson, general manager of the Cloud Platform Services Division for IBM.

The apps and snap-on smartphone monitoring devices are letting physicians integrate biometric data from wearables into patient data and analyze patient data at fast speed, Robinson writes at InformationWeek. The benefits are just as extensive as the functionality being developed, he says

The gains include everything from simplifying records and improving doctor-patient conversations to gaining a holistic view of a diabetic's health. Doctors can "crunch and analyze patient data at rapid speeds to help identify patterns and predict future health and treatment needs," he writes.

"Mobile apps can help diabetes sufferers get ahead of their symptoms and live healthier, more carefree lives," Robinson says. 

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Diabetes tools have ranged from providing smartphone coaching that is helping diabetics living in low to modest socioeconomic communities manage their disease and improving their health, to a wearable, automated bionic pancreas for continuous glucose monitor and a software algorithm, according to a study at the New England Journal of Medicine.

In addition, mobile monitoring of diabetic employees can save more than $3,000 a year in healthcare costs, half of the average annual medical insurance cost for workers diagnosed with diabetes. 

Today's tools and cloud-based capabilities are reducing those costs while also driving innovation for disease management, Robinson says.

"Using cloud services, combined with the ease and convenience of mobile, new methods of managing this disease are being brought to patients around the world," he writes.

For more information:
- read the article

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mHealth: Are You Ready for Sensors in Healthcare?

mHealth: Are You Ready for Sensors in Healthcare? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The market for wearable sensors is increasing dramatically. Devices are being designed to help people manage chronic conditions, recover more quickly from injuries, analyze physical and environmental abnormalities that may lead to more serious health issues and detect unhealthy habits before they cause problems, according to Pathfinder Software. A new infographic from Pathfinder Software takes a look at the types of wearables available, how they are used, their wireless capability and other details on this technology. Thank you to Pathfinder Software for an educational Infographic. Also, thank you to the Healthcare Intelligence Network for having this Infographic on their site.


Via ET Russell, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, September 17, 2014 5:02 AM

Parece que los wearables (dispositivos vestibles), es la tecnología de moda ¿cómo chocará esta tecnología con la salud clásica?

Bouzid Menaa's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:28 AM

In collaboration with international renowned scientists, I am developing a new quantitative and qualitative  mobile device for bacterial surface detection and diagnostic tool

 

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Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews

Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

According to a survey of thousands of patients in Germany, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, the adoption of digital healthcare services remains low because existing services are either low quality or not meeting patients’ needs. The survey, conducted by consulting firm McKinsey, included responses from at least 1,000 patients in the three countries.

“Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations; decision makers often cite data that point to relatively low usage of digital healthcare services,” McKinsey analysts Stefan Biesdorf and Florian Niedermann wrote in a recent blog post. “In fact, the results of our survey reveal something quite different. The reason patients are slow to adopt digital healthcare is primarily because existing services don’t meet their needs or because they are of poor quality.” 

McKinsey found that more than 75 percent of respondents would like to use some kind of digital health service. Many are interested in “mundane” offerings, the firm wrote.

 

 


Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, LA BLOUSE BLANCHE , Giuseppe Fattori
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rob halkes's curator insight, July 16, 2014 7:18 AM

Great Survey results, aligning with what experts already thought. Results generated by Germany, Singapore and the UK, but believed to be representative of patients in these advanced markets.


See my conclusions upon reading the report here

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:32 AM

Los resultados de una encuesta parecen derribar algunos mitos respecto de la "salud móvil" o m-health como "Esta tecnología solo la usan los jóvenes".

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5 crowdfunded apps, devices for health tracking | mobihealthnews

5 crowdfunded apps, devices for health tracking | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Last month, we compiled a list of 9 companies that had new takes on self-tracking and were crowdfunding on Indiegogo. The list included Push, an armband that tracks force instead of just activity level, Angel, an open source activity tracker that lets the developer decide what the device should do, and TellSpec, a spectrometer-enabled food tracker.

Push passed its goal of $80,000 by $54,000 and Angel passed its goal of $100,000 by over $200,000, but besides Push, Angel and Tellspec, the rest of the companies on the last roundup did not reach their funding goals.

Since then, five other health products have been added to Indiegogo and Kickstarter. Many examples on this list also utilize different methods for health tracking and awareness, like a sensor that tracks sitting time instead of activity time and an algorithm that gets information from texting instead of an app to track nutrition.

ScanZ

ScanZ says it understands its user’s skin, and that it can answer the three questions everyone with a blemish asks. One, ‘when will it go away?’, two, ‘what should I do to make it go away faster’, and three, ‘if the user doesn’t have a pimple, will he or she break out?’ The system uses a device that scans the user’s face and a companion app that answers these questions for the user. Algorithms within the app are based off Mayo Clinic’s algorithms, which, ScanZ says, “mirror a dermatologist’s process of solving skin problems.” Users can track the progress of their blemishes on the app and also be prepared for what may happen in the future.

During the crowdfunding campaign, ScanZ is offering the device for $199, which is $50 off it


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eHealth research in Sierre, Switzerland

A l'occasion de la première journée eHealth du 7 juin 2013, Prof. Henning Müller et Prof. Michael Schumacher ont présenté les projets de recherche eHealth de notre institut.


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Mobile Health Around the Globe: FaceTalk Makes Patients Partners | HealthWorks Collective

Mobile Health Around the Globe: FaceTalk Makes Patients Partners | HealthWorks Collective | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
For an increasing number of patients, it is difficult to make an appointment with a doctor or other healthcare provider. This is due to a patient's decreased mobility or lack of time. The eHealth application FaceTalk provides the solution.

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eHealth Network adopts guidelines ePrescriptions

eHealth Network adopts guidelines ePrescriptions | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

National health systems are moving more and more towards electronic systems for medical prescriptions. The European Commission and EU countries have a common goal to ensure that these electronic prescriptions can be used safely in another Member State.

This is why the eHealth Network, made up of representatives of all 28 EU countries and chaired by the Commission, has been working jointly on ePrescriptions.

The guidelines that were agreed on, lay out the type of data needed to share prescriptions across borders. They also describe how the data should be transferred, provided the patient has given his or her consent to use the ePrescription service.

The guidelines can be used by Member States on a voluntary basis.

The 6th eHealth Network meeting in Brussels took place on 18 November 2014 and was chaired by Austria and co-chaired by the European Commission.

Source: Website Health and Consumers, DG SANCO


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Charlotte de Broglie's curator insight, December 1, 2014 9:54 AM

International interoperable datasets standards for ePrescriptions agreed upon by european commission #movingfwd #cossborder #eHealth

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Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 7, Issue 1 Jan. 2013.

El-Gayar, Timsina and Nawar.

 

ABSTRACT

Background:
Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions.
Methods:
The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period fromJanuary 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor.
Results:
Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records.
Conclusions:
Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs.


J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(1):247–262    


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rob halkes's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:29 AM

There is good perspective to mobile health (ehealth) applications to self management in diabetes. However, as this research review suggests: we need to know more about use and socio technological influences. As I repeat myself: ehealth mhealth is NOT about technology: it is about implementation. Let's go for that!

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Doctors and Tech: Who Serves Whom?

Doctors and Tech: Who Serves Whom? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Giving physicians more say in how to incorporate technology into their work is good for patients, and the field.

 

If you want to discourage a worker, subject them to policies and procedures that don’t make sense. This principle was first described by Frederick Herzberg, an American psychologist who developed one of the most widely studied theories of workplace motivation. Unfortunately, Herzberg’s principle is being widely applied today in medicine. Changes in healthcare payment systems, the use of information technology, and the doctor-patient relationship have left many doctors deeply discouraged.

...

It is easy for many healthcare leaders to forget that doctors go into medicine not because they enjoy entering data into complex electronic health records and ensuring that their employer gets paid for everything they do, but because they want to make good diagnoses, prescribe appropriate treatments, and help patients.

...

 

What can be done? Weygandt argues that doctors need to play a more active role in all aspects of healthcare’s future, not just implementing but also designing it. Too often, such decisions are currently being made by people who do not take care of patients, and in many cases, have never cared for patients.

 

“Every innovation should be tested not just to see if it increases revenue or cuts costs,” he says, “but also to ensure that it enhances the doctor-patient relationship.”

 

Everyone involved in contemporary healthcare—patients, doctors, nurses, hospital administrators, payers, and politicians—needs to recognize the importance of preserving and promoting medical professionalism. Good medical care is an art as well as a science, and the professionalism of doctors is at its core. “Doctors should be encouraged to think first not of their own incomes but the needs of their patients, and that means designing systems that keep the patient front and center.”

...

New technology can do a better job of helping doctors practice better medicine.... But change isn’t easy. ...

As Frederick Herzberg would put it, “If we want doctors to do better work, we need to give them better work to do.” Medicine practiced well—in such a way that it really makes a difference in the lives of patients, families, and communities—is a great deal more fulfilling than medicine practiced poorly. If doctors are to enjoy the opportunity to make such a difference, they must cease to be the tools of their tools, and instead become their designers.

 



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rob halkes's curator insight, March 25, 2014 5:21 AM

The blog does describe neatly the optimal and ideal relationship between engineers and doctors. I would say co-creation of technology by all stakeholders would be the norm. Next to doctors I would also prompt to involve patients into it. Often I have witnessed simple issues that make the difference to them.

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Infographic: Patients Want Access To Their Electronic Medical Records

Infographic: Patients Want Access To Their Electronic Medical Records | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
84 percent of US consumers believe they should have full access to their electronic medical records while only a third of physicians (34 percent) share this belief, according to an Accenture survey.

Via rob halkes, Giuseppe Fattori
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rob halkes's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:40 PM

Good to se that patient empowerment is growing!

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Telehealth revenues to grow 55 percent in 2013 | mobihealthnews

Telehealth revenues to grow 55 percent in 2013 | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

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