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Beyond Wearables: are Hearables, ingestibles & Embeddables the Future of the IoT?

Beyond Wearables: are Hearables, ingestibles & Embeddables the Future of the IoT? | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it

Whilst the Internet of Things continues to be a growing aspect of our day-to-day lives, we are only at the beginning: soon we will be entering an era where technology is a true extension of self ...


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Evolution of the Desk

Evolution of the Desk | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
See how the office desk has evolved in the past 30 years.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 1, 2015 5:00 PM

Scroll down for the GIF file that shows where all of this stuff on the cluttered desk went, pretty cool to see where all this stuff went - oh yeah and some of it goes on your smartphone too.  At the end of the day managing your life and your work on your smartphone won't work, it doesn't have the interface for it to do all of that heavy lifting, meaning the PC is here to stay.


Added: the original source location of the GIF file is http://bestreviews.com/electronics#evolution-of-the-desk



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Mobile medical apps are gaining support, but many lack clinical evidence

Mobile medical apps are gaining support, but many lack clinical evidence | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Mobile medical applications increasingly are being used by patients and consumers. Now healthcare providers are evaluating whether and how to work with their patients in tapping these apps. But they're proceeding cautiously because of the dearth of clinical evidence for many consumer apps.

Via Philippe Marchal, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Richard Platt
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Medihoo's curator insight, December 2, 2015 1:34 PM
Especially In the health sector it is indeed important to realise people need to be able to rely on what is claimed.
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The State of the IoT in 6 Visual Categories

The State of the IoT in 6 Visual Categories | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
In this infographic we explain what is the current state of internet of things in visual form.

Via ManufacturingStories, Richard Platt
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, December 2, 2015 4:47 PM

#IoT #Infographic #SmartHome #Cloud #SmartFactory #SmartCar

Richard Platt's curator insight, December 3, 2015 1:11 AM

The IoT is much bigger than you think it is, a worthwhile infographic to have to remind yourself how big it is.

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18 things that have no business being connected to the internet

18 things that have no business being connected to the internet | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is everywhere these days, but that doesn't mean it should be.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 3, 2015 6:22 PM

For the most part, at least 17 of the 18 devices are not really addressing any real kind of problem or meeting a specific need that really has to be addressed, hence useless designs.  

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The New Raspberry Pi: Smaller and Somehow Cheaper

The New Raspberry Pi: Smaller and Somehow Cheaper | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Raspberry Pi has just managed to do what every technology manufacturer should strive to achieve: it made its basic product both smaller and cheaper at the same time.
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The Top EdTech Trends for 2014

The Top EdTech Trends for 2014 | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it

"One thing that is constant in EdTech is change, and this change keeps on happening rapidly. Trends in EdTech keep on altering and evolving with time and as we approach the New Year let’s look at what EdTech trends we should expect this coming year."


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This App Overhauls the Calculator For Mobile Devices

This App Overhauls the Calculator For Mobile Devices | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Calculators fall somewhere between socks and toothbrushes on the excitement scale, but one new app aims to make them fun again.
Tydlig, a recently released app for iPhone and iPad, rethinks the calculator-app experience for mobile devices.

Via Thomas Faltin
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8 predictions for 2014 from a VC's perspective - Fortune

8 predictions for 2014 from a VC's perspective - Fortune | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
8 predictions for 2014 from a VC's perspective Fortune FORTUNE -- As we end a successful 2013 for the tech/Internet venture world, I wanted to share some thoughts on what may be coming in 2014 as it relates to major global Internet & mobile trends,...
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Gorilla Glass - Make Fun With It

technology technology articles technology news latest technology business technology new technology gadgets types of technology technology jobs define techno...
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Education Technology (Ed Tech) & Smart Classroom Market Expected to Reach ... - SBWire (press release)

Education Technology (Ed Tech) & Smart Classroom Market Expected to Reach ... - SBWire (press release) | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Education Technology (Ed Tech) & Smart Classroom Market Expected to Reach ...
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Using technology to elevate education - Richmond Times Dispatch

Using technology to elevate education - Richmond Times Dispatch | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Using technology to elevate education
Richmond Times Dispatch
However, most students are clueless as to how to use technology to further their education.
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The Best Educational Technology Blogs in 2013 ~ Educational ...

The Best Educational Technology Blogs in 2013 ~ Educational ... | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
For the second consecutive year Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has been nominated and featured in the finalist list of the best educational technology resource sharing blog. What started as a small project in the summer of ...
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4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer

4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer

Via Marta Torán, massimo facchinetti, Richard Platt
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Marta Torán's curator insight, November 16, 2015 3:23 PM

Razones para usar impresoras 3D en clase.

Richard Platt's curator insight, November 16, 2015 6:29 PM

The use of 3D printers is becoming increasingly prevalent across the workforce, from medicine to confectionary, aerospace to sportswear.  The mere concept of them can seem daunting, and it is therefore easy for school leaders to overlook the benefits a 3D printer can have for their pupils. We’ve put together a list of strong arguments in favor of this fantastic investment in a bid to help you put forward a winning pitch to your school decision makers.  They Can Be Used in Any Subject  Although you may see the triumphs of 3D printing most commonly associated with fields in Science, the use of these printers can be extended to almost any subject in the curriculum. In math, they have been used to help students visualise a particularly difficult concept or graph, with the added benefit of adding an exciting factor to a subject that typically has a ‘boring’ reputation. History lessons could come alive with replicas of ancient artifacts and geography students could visit mountain ranges without leaving the classroom.

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Internet of Things 2015: The Year in Review

Internet of Things 2015: The Year in Review | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
In 2015, the ecosystem of commerce, technology, enterprise, government, and the world at large has never been more welcoming for the Internet of Things.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:56 PM

This IoT stuff is not going away, it is here to stay and will shape the vast majority of business for years to come. Good idea to review where we've come through in the past year.

Eric Redegeld's curator insight, December 3, 2015 4:33 PM

This IoT stuff is not going away, it is here to stay and will shape the vast majority of business for years to come. Good idea to review where we've come through in the past year.

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3D-Printed Pills could be the Future of Medicine

3D-Printed Pills could be the Future of Medicine | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Some of the most impressive achievements in 3D printing so far have happened in the field of medicine. Fully customized casts, implants, medical supplies and braces have all been created using the technology, helping people get well in ways that wouldn't have been possible before. And human

Via TechinBiz, Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 2, 2015 1:15 AM

The technology is finding its way into labs and hospitals around the world, so it only makes sense that medical organizations would start heavily vetting its potential. At this year's American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference, researchers discussed how the tech could help in the delivery of medicine.  Researchers from Wake Forest University, Columbia University and University of North Carolina presented a prototype 3D printer software that could create customized pills for patients requiring medication. The team designed an algorithm that adjusts dosages based on factors like a patient's weight, race, kidney and liver functions. These factors can all change the effectiveness of a drug and even lead to detrimental side effects, but can't always be accounted for when using pre-formulated medicines. Based on a patient's individual medical and biological information, the software calculates the appropriate dose and then generates the 3D printer data. In testing, the researchers created customized profiles that resulted in five different doses of 80 total printed pills using a testing material. The pills ranged from 124 milligrams to 373 mg and were all accurate dosages with very little variability.  The study proved that 3D printing could be used to personalize pills and that a future of more effective drug treatment with fewer side effects is possible, but printed pills will still be a few years off. The researchers now need to develop a standard adjustment for different drugs and come up with the most cost-effective and safe printing techniques before any patients down them with a glass of water.

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Intelligent Dressing Glows When Wounds Are Infected

Intelligent Dressing Glows When Wounds Are Infected | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
When we experience a wound, it's not just the torn tissue we have to worry about. Patients can go on to develop infections, potentially leaving them vulnerable to organ damage if it spreads and putting their chances of recovery in jeopardy. With the aim of reducing this risk, scientists have developed a prototype wound dressing that's able to detect the presence of bacteria in the crucial early hours of infection.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 2, 2015 1:21 AM

Bacteria that colonize wounds tend to create and live in a biofilm, a slimy substance made of external DNA, proteins and complex sugars. If present, the dressing reacts with the biofilms by turning a bright fluorescent color.  “The dressing detects changes in wound bacterial activity. All wounds have some bacteria in [them] – whilst they are kept in check by immune clearance this is not a problem, but when bacteria start to form biofilms and critically colonise the wound, pathogenic changes can result. Our dressing will measure this critical colonisation point,” Dr. Toby Jenkins, co-author of the research, told IFLScience.  The dressing was tested with the common infection-causing bacteria E. coli and S. aureus, among others, and also on colonies of different ages and thus biofilm development.

The detection rate for biofilms from pathogenic, or harmful, strains was surprisingly fast. In lab tests, the wound dressing could reveal the presence of bacteria within four hours from the initial inoculation, but for an established biofilm, the response was within minutes.  The technology could become paramount in post-surgery recovery. “If used appropriately, we believe it can be used for early diagnosis of post-surgical infection and hence (indirectly) in reducing incidences of sepsis,” added Dr. Jenkins. Unfortunately, the intelligent wound dressing has a long way to go: “We are working on safety testing, working out a manufacturing pathway, and plan [on conducting] a clinical study in about 3 years.” 

d-tayl.com's curator insight, December 2, 2015 7:14 AM

Bacteria that colonize wounds tend to create and live in a biofilm, a slimy substance made of external DNA, proteins and complex sugars. If present, the dressing reacts with the biofilms by turning a bright fluorescent color.  “The dressing detects changes in wound bacterial activity. All wounds have some bacteria in [them] – whilst they are kept in check by immune clearance this is not a problem, but when bacteria start to form biofilms and critically colonise the wound, pathogenic changes can result. Our dressing will measure this critical colonisation point,” Dr. Toby Jenkins, co-author of the research, told IFLScience.  The dressing was tested with the common infection-causing bacteria E. coli and S. aureus, among others, and also on colonies of different ages and thus biofilm development.

The detection rate for biofilms from pathogenic, or harmful, strains was surprisingly fast. In lab tests, the wound dressing could reveal the presence of bacteria within four hours from the initial inoculation, but for an established biofilm, the response was within minutes.  The technology could become paramount in post-surgery recovery. “If used appropriately, we believe it can be used for early diagnosis of post-surgical infection and hence (indirectly) in reducing incidences of sepsis,” added Dr. Jenkins. Unfortunately, the intelligent wound dressing has a long way to go: “We are working on safety testing, working out a manufacturing pathway, and plan [on conducting] a clinical study in about 3 years.” 

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Patent shows Google plans a 'needle-free blood draw' system

Patent shows Google plans a 'needle-free blood draw' system | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
The design (illustrated), filed with the USPTO in Virginia, describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel that contains a ‘micro-particle’ capable of puncturing the skin.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Richard Platt
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Upshot2shop's curator insight, December 7, 2015 3:59 AM

Google has filed a patent for a 'needle-free blood draw' system that could be built into a wearable attached to someone's wrist, or a hand-held device. The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a 'micro-particle' capable of puncturing the skin and drawing a small drop of blood.  Google suggests the device could even replace glucose testers used by diabetics entirely. 

 

The patent said: 'Such an application might be used to draw a small amount of blood, for example, for a glucose test.'  It points out that the smallest possible puncture is desirable to cause as little pain as possible, but very small diameter needles can fail to pierce the skin or snap because they're not strong enough.  However, the use of a 'micro particle' propelled by gas at a high speed could solve this problem.  Google is already working on smart contact lenses and a cloud-connected sensors to help diabetics monitor their glucose levels.   A wearable or handheld device would therefor fit neatly into this initiative.  However, as with all patents, there is no guarantee the idea will ever become a reality.   Google is not the only tech giant taking steps into the healthcare market.  Health data has become the next big battleground among tech companies as a new generation of wearable gadgets allow users to measure heart rates, sleep patterns and exercise activities.

Ante Lauc's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:59 AM

I have diabetes almost 20 years and expect .....' Needle free blood draw' 

Internet of things will help me, together with ....to become without diabetes.

Darrin Shaw's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:40 AM

Google has filed a patent for a 'needle-free blood draw' system that could be built into a wearable attached to someone's wrist, or a hand-held device. The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a 'micro-particle' capable of puncturing the skin and drawing a small drop of blood.  Google suggests the device could even replace glucose testers used by diabetics entirely. 


 


The patent said: 'Such an application might be used to draw a small amount of blood, for example, for a glucose test.'  It points out that the smallest possible puncture is desirable to cause as little pain as possible, but very small diameter needles can fail to pierce the skin or snap because they're not strong enough.  However, the use of a 'micro particle' propelled by gas at a high speed could solve this problem.  Google is already working on smart contact lenses and a cloud-connected sensors to help diabetics monitor their glucose levels.   A wearable or handheld device would therefor fit neatly into this initiative.  However, as with all patents, there is no guarantee the idea will ever become a reality.   Google is not the only tech giant taking steps into the healthcare market.  Health data has become the next big battleground among tech companies as a new generation of wearable gadgets allow users to measure heart rates, sleep patterns and exercise activities.

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The Higher Education Short List of Emerging Technology

The Higher Education Short List of Emerging Technology | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
The NMC Horizon Project will choose six technologies that could be adopted over the next five years. (I'm interested in augmented reality.

Via Chris Carter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 3, 2014 3:09 AM

MOOCs not so much, and others sooner rather than later.

Chris Carter's comment, January 3, 2014 7:13 AM
You are welcome, Luciana. I do disagree to some degree with much of this list, but that is the point, I believe. Debating and discussing these points, like iron sharpening iron, makes us better understand our own positions.
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Ways to Use Technology to Engage With Parents

Ways to Use Technology to Engage With Parents | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Technology can be introduced in classrooms to develop a better connection, interaction and communication between students, teachers and parents.

Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, January 4, 2014 9:43 AM

The Last Frontier for many schools. ;)

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Wearable Technology

There's an emerging technology that you can wear. Not to be behind the times, Ellen has come up with some of her own inventions.
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Free Productivity Resources for Educators | Emerging Education Technology

Free Productivity Resources for Educators | Emerging Education Technology | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
This listing is divided into two key groups - tools intended specifically for educators, and general applications intended for everyone. We've made an

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Gianfranco D'Aversa's curator insight, February 11, 2013 10:59 AM

This listing is divided into two key groups - tools intended specifically for educators, and general applications intended for everyone. We've made an

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Google's 4K video format to hit TVs, mobile devices, PCs - PCWorld

Google's 4K video format to hit TVs, mobile devices, PCs - PCWorld | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Google's 4K video format to hit TVs, mobile devices, PCs PCWorld Google is working with hardware makers so TVs, smartphones and PCs can play 4K content from YouTube and other streaming services while consuming almost half the bandwidth required by...
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2014 Technology Pioneers: Trends in Innovation - Diplomatic Courier

2014 Technology Pioneers: Trends in Innovation - Diplomatic Courier | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
2014 Technology Pioneers: Trends in Innovation
Diplomatic Courier
The list is largely dominated by companies focusing on four different areas: medicine and healthcare, big data, education, and green technology.
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Teachers Ultimate Digital Kit 30+ Great Educational Technology Guides ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Teachers Ultimate Digital Kit 30+ Great Educational Technology Guides ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Mobile-Emerging Tech | Scoop.it
Educator Technology guides http://t.co/QObssueVsa!
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