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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Regional Geography
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Palestinian Loss of Land

Palestinian Loss of Land...

 

This video is very informative for those who did not know that Palestine really exists. There are many who are led by the search engines on the web and believe that Palestine is just a place made up by someone, or that it is located within other Islamic countries. Through the years Palestine has lost its land but we must remember that at one point that land also belonged to Israel. This battle between religion and people has led to a constant feud over land. A certain amount of years it belongs to one and then the other claims/reclaims it. It's wishful thinking to one day see the land split equally between both. I believe this video is good for those who do not know how much land belonged to who, how it is lost, and where it is located. It seems as though Israel has control over the land at this moment in time but we also have to consider what may happen in the future and whether or not it will be reclaimed by Palestine. This video gives people something to research and find out the real facts behind this little land strip. M. Carvajal


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:44 PM

Interesting that they showed a map of 1886.  Palestine didn't exits in 1886 either, it was under control of the Ottoman Empire and the Ottoman Turks.  Egypy controlled this area at one time, around 3000BC, Then there was a Kingdom of Israle around 1050 BC, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Macedonains, Romans, Byzantines, Sassanids, Muslims of the Caliphates, Seljuks, Europeans during the Crusades, Saladin, Ottomans, Europeans again after WW I, then the state of Israel after the end of WW 2 all controlled this area.  This area has been under control of many different rulers, empires and cultures.  I know I must have missed some.  It is not as simple as Palestininians lossing land, the issue goes wat back before anyone today cares ot even remember.  If Im right there was never a state called Palestine under modern times, but there was a Kingdom of Israel.  I know that is not a justification for the right to exist or not exits, but it shows a history of a nation of Israel.  If the Palestinian people want a state, why don't they recognize that Israel has the same right?  One that might be grounded in history more than theirs.  I do believe the Palestinians have the right to  state, but they need to recognize that Israel has the same right that they want. 

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TED Talk: Readings of the Qu'ran

Lesley Hazleton explores the Quran and finds much that is quite different from what is reported in commonly cited accounts. A psychologist by training and Mi...

 

This video was excellent because it shows how many things when translated are lost or misquoted. Can't really say much as I myself have never read the Qu'ran. I do not intend to say that she is entirely right with her presentation nor say that she is wrong. From her perspective however, I did enjoy that she seems to have done some research, and in the end she states something very true. Whenever you translate something, more often then not, something will be misquoted and/or omitted.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:04 PM

Interesting video. We also see how interpretations can be warped with the Quran but that is not exclusive to this one text. The Bible for instance falls victim to the same circumstances.

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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
She was one of the world's most famous faces, yet no one knew who she was. Her image appeared on the front of magazines and books, posters, lapel pins, and even rugs, but she didn't know it.

 

It is amazing that so many are photographed and used in articles, magazines, and for class presentations however no one really every takes the time to know who all these people are. I had seen this photograph during my middle and high school years but never knew who she was. It is fascinating that after twenty years she was found once again however the once young face is now aged and more than what it should be. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and its important people know that..I must say that it is sad to see that people who live in refugee camps are so affected by the weather and living conditions. I'm assuming that there are many who never knew who she was, where she was from, and didn't care to know. I always wondered however if she ever received any of the money that was earned from the repeated use of her photographs. As its stated in the article she claimed that she is "looked after". We see that muslim faith and traditions are still  instilled in this area. She had to be granted permission by her family to be able to speak to the photographer once again. It proves that certain traditions will always continue to exist and it gives us a better sense of how faiths continue to control certain aspects of people's lives. Not that it is a bad thing but its good that we see this. - M. Carvajal


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.

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Will There Be a Central Asian Spring?

Will There Be a Central Asian Spring? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

Kazakhstan may not be ripe for revolution, but the West is making the same mistakes it made in the Arab world

 

All there really is to say about this issue is that in times where it is benificial for other countries to turn their head, they will. It is a shame that there was no intervention. Not for the benefit of the government or foreign countries, but for the benfit of the people who would be affected from the results of this election. As said within this article referring to the day that Nursultan Nazarbayev basically stole the election..  "On that day democracy was killed, just as in Zhanaozen our peaceful citizens were killed with machine guns!" - OSDP deputy leader Amirzhan Kosanov. People are losing their rights and freedom and all due to the fact that rich people in certain nations can get away with things based on their economic standing and who they know politically. Not only this, but if you do interfere or say something, you can disappear and no one would question it. If someone is in good favor with anyone in the west, they get away with more than those who are not on that friendly of a term. People can shape countries however they want, rule their people however they want, but it should still be up to the people to elect their ruler in a fair election. No matter who is friends with who, justice should be served equally. -- M.Carvajal


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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:36 AM
It is sad to see Western nations ignoring Kazakhstan's drift into dictatorship as it ignores all democratic ways of governance. Since the current leader in charge is friendly with the west, powers like NATO do little to intervene. The hypocrisy behind it is that we did and said much more in Syria and Egypt where similar events took place.
Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:44 PM

It bothers me that this is being over looked by our government.  If they are going to stand up and back the resurgance in Syria and Egypt then why are we not doing it here to?  All it would take would take is a backing from our government, but due to the ties that the have with the West, we are not stepping in.  This shows complete hypocrisy on our part. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:36 AM

I couldn't view this article for some reason. It wanted me to subscribe to something.

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.

 

It's sad to see how the enviroment is being affected based on how people are using it in order to survive. There is really no win win situation here unless people chose to leave and start their life elsewhere. We also have to take consideration the fact that many of the people around the Aral Sea do not have the means to relocate. The Aral Sea has progressively lost its size based on crops that have been farmed around its area. As more and more crops are grown, more and more water is being taken from the sea. Pretty soon there will be no more than just a dry land that once was a water source for life. Again, many of the people in this area rely on their crops to survive, but what will happen once the water has run dry? There is always a way to prevent things from happening but it takes a great effort and times are not giving people that option. -- M. Carvajal


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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:57 PM

Great tool to show students how human use of natural resources can change landscapes and have permanent impacts on geographical landmarks such as the aerial sea. How do we stop it? Can we undo the damage done? How do we prevent these tragedies from happening in the future?

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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

It is understandable to see where Latvians are coming from. For many, its the only thing that they can hold on to: Culture. Latvians feel as though they should be able to hold on to their own language and shouldn't have to learn another if they are in an area where they all speak the same. It almost relates to how cultural identity is perceived here in the US. Many feel as though they do not need to learn spanish for this was an english speaking country. & there are others who believe that languages are forced on them. The issue will always remain however, in a place where majority of the people speak Russian it would be wise for everyone to atleast make it a language you can learn about it in school at your own discretion. Imposing it as a national language is indeed hindering those who do not speak it and who are possibly older in age to learn it. That takes away from people having the right to chose what they want to learn and identify with. --M. Carvajal

 

For more on the vote, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17083397    


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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:14 AM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 5, 2015 4:54 PM

About 35 percent of Latvia's population (5,000,000) contains Russian ancestors. Russia does not want to give Latvia credit for practicing Russian languages and the Russian heritage because Russian feels like since they take up about 11% of the world, they don't need to share their heritage with any other country. It's kind of like copyright laws that Russia seems to have.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:37 PM

this article is great. the latvians are doing the right thing. in the place you live and where you are from, the people should speak your language and follow your rules. you should be worried about what the native people want and not what others want. be proud of your culture and preserve it.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

 

--We need to consider many things when we see this video. First and foremost, the mill was a main source for labor and economic growth in this small town. Many generations have worked in this location post- Soviet issues. The fact that in those times it was not considered a source of harm for the wildlife and human life that surrounded it, means a great deal. You have to consider that people were focused on production and exporting what they had in order to maintain a stable place in the trade field. People were not focusing on the long term effects but rather being able to provide food and shelter for their families. Many people to this day put their lives at risk working in less than safe locations around the world. We have to see the need for these people to continue putting themselves at risk. Now, enviromentalists are saying that the waste and the pollution associated with the mill is harmful and can cause devastation to the wildlife and lake. Yes, it is true. However, to what extent can they continue to push this mill to close down and to what extent will their conscience give in and realize that by closing this location down they are contributing to the deaths of many because there will be no way for them to earn money and survive. Of course no one wants to destory a beautiful lake or the wildlife in it, but have enviromentalists considered ways of making the mill more enviromental friendly? -- M. Carvajal

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.


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Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 18, 2015 11:12 PM

Lake Baikal is one Russia's oldest and deepest body of freshwater but is turning into a swamp, Russian ecologists warn. They say that tons of liquid waste from tourist camps and water transport vehicles is being dumped into the lake. The financial crisis in Russian has been a big problem because it is leaving factories abandoned and leaving waste all over towns. If Baikal is ruined, it is going to put tons of peoples lives at risk for people who depend on this water. Also, a part of this Lake is frozen. This is fresh clean water that makes this lake what it is. 

The paper factory has caused some major pollution into the lake and all the chemicals are affecting the lake each and everyday. This beautiful land could possibly be destroyed for measures aren't taken, and can also just be another wasteland. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:31 PM

This mill on Lake Biakal was created in the soviet era. This was created and made a increasing well place to work with the promise of a bright future for its workers. Instead when it comes to the post soviet era its a failing community. Not because of the workers but because of the era that they live in. The age of environmentalists. because of this the mill and its workers are suffering. Many of the people that had moved there to work in the mill in the 60's with a promise of a bright future. However today the people who originally moved there and the descendents are paying the price for the soviet promise. If the mill were to forever close then the people of the area would basically have no life and future. They wouldnt even have enough money to move out of look for jobs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:28 PM

Seeing this video and the lack of human development in this small town is astounding. They are destroying a lake and the environment about them, they do not care though. Unfortunately, they have to not care about the environment, they are so desperate for work to make money to live and support themselves and family, that they are willing to do what it takes to keep their jobs at the mill. The workers and citizens of the area know about the consequences of the pollution, they know it needs to be taken care of, but with the depravity they have, they have to. They are faced with a situation no one want to be in... work and destroy the environment so they have money to live, or be without life necessities. 

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Haiti: Legacy of Disaster

Haiti: Legacy of Disaster | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Even before the earthquake Haiti's environment teetered on the brink of disaster. Brent and Craig Renaud report on the country's deforestation problems."

 

-As previously stated in another scoop I have mentioned that Haiti is indeed a very poor country in terms of its economy and way of living for the citizens there. The fact that country is stil 97% deforested is a simple way for us to see how bad the economy can get that without consideration of long term effects, people being to live off the land and create there own enviromental issues. Haiti geographically is already a target for hurricanes for its location on an island, however it is much more vulnerable because of the lack of forest and support that trees give to prevent mudslides and heavy flooding. Its neighbor country Dominican Republic is fine because they have a better economic advantage with their forest still existing and the incoming money from US citizens who send money back to their families. Haiti on the other hand is suffering because once they exhaust all possible resources, they dig for more and cut down for more. In order for there to be a growth in economy and a way of people surviving there has to be some way that they can work to earn money without having to destroy their natural resources.

People living in huts, hardly any electricity and poor nutrition is shocking because you rarely think that people still live this way. A major investment to this country for electricity and re planting of trees would benefit its people. Not only that but if there could be some form of economic gain through tourism, maybe the country would see a chance in change instead of its downhill spiral. The government needs to find a remedy for their issues and take the time to care for those who have no place to live. A solution must be available to save the country from an economic downfall as well as  a decrease in its population due to health and natural problems- M.C


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 25, 2014 10:26 AM

(Central America topic 2)

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Or in this case:

Which came first, the deforestation or the disparity?

I believe the answer can be both.

At first such a country's inhabitants might not know what devastating impacts manmade environmental changes such as deforestation can have - or, they might just have no other choice. Here disparity comes first. But unfortunately such effects can be far reaching. Deforestation can 'come back around' and be the cause (not only the result) of disparity: erosion, flooding, landslides, lack of natural resources. These all contribute to further disasters and crises, which continue the repeating trend.

Dr. Bonin has held classes pertaining to this same issue of deforestation, among the other issues which Haitians face. IN addition, the company I work for has been sponsoring a campaign to help humanitarian efforts in the country, and I have worked with people who have lived there.

Lastly, I can't help but notice an uncanny similarity between the deforestation of Haiti and that of Easter Island. I hope Easter Is. will be used as a warning message.

 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 29, 2015 3:13 PM

Conditions in Haiti were bad in Haiti even before the disaster of the 2010 Haitian Earthquake occurred. The video shows images of the clear deforestation Haiti is suffering as a country. A lot of the mountain tops and hills are seen white without those bright green colors. It is said that the country is already 97% deforested. The reason so is because charcoal is basically the only way Haitians can cook and even make money off of if possible. Sometimes people do not like to accept that the countries own people, are affecting their living environment. Haitians live in a country where nights are spent in the dark in rural areas. The charcoal is the light Haitians depend on as well.

Haiti is a country of extreme poverty that don't offer an alternative to charcoal, which is the reason for its deforestation. A lot of Haitians blame the governed for the lack of infrastructure in the country but its all the mudslides fault. It is something that physically humans can not contain unless alternative methods are used to prevent deforestation. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 8:05 PM

Conditions in Haiti are just terrible. This place is 90% deforested and people use charcoal and such to cook. Haiti was hit by an earthquake in 2010, but even before the earthquake, deforestation was a major problem. Most of the people that live here live in darkness with no electricity. To get light, people use charcoal, charcoal has very many great uses in Haiti. Individual survival means cutting down as many trees as possible to get charcoal so you can provide for family. Problems with this country is that technologically and natural disaster survivalness is poor. Floods and mudslides will continue to happen and people will die, also the infrastructure will not improve. A lot of problem would come from the government too, lack of help from a government creates a failing nation. 

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

 

-The fact that Venice is slowly sinking is not surprising as here in the US we have our own states with cities that are easily affected by hurricanes etc due to their sea level. The interesting point about Venice is however, that they began to build a wall with gate that would close off the rising sea level to Venice and prevent it from possibly flooding during an event where the water would try to get in. In the article it is stated that the wall/gate itself is sinking as well every year as the ground sinks. Now, these expensive flood walls will need to be patched as the sink in order to keep the height at a level where it will still protect the city. To what extent will this continue is uncertain and can the flooding plus the sinking eventually ruin Venice forever?  I believe that the city was originally made this way to allow the import and export of goods as it was easier to transport from one side of venice to the other through water. With this being said, it was easier for people to stand by and buy off the boat/gandola and for the merchant it was easier to hand up as well. This being my opinion, reasons could have been different and the thought of what could potentially happen to the city were probably no where near. We still have to take into consideration that no matter how profitable it may have been to have a city with water streets, it created a liability for the people that reside in this area. - M.C


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Distilling ethanol from tropical sugarcane takes less land and uses less fossil fuel than starting with corn grown in temperate climes. That makes Brazilian ethanol, unlike the pampered and grotesquely wasteful American version, competitive with hydrocarbons and genuinely good for the environment." 

 

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  For a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol, see: http://cei.org/studies-issue-analysis/brazilian-sugarcane-ethanol-experience  

 

--Well in this given situation though the benefit would be great to have alternative fuel and hopefully a reduction in price, does it affect the enviroment to the point where it can cause issues for the people of the land where it is being created..Meaning, all politics to the side, will the creation of such fuels and transport of fuels damage the land, cause a lack of resources for the people there etc. I believe this is what is being weighed and it should be since we have already used up most of the natural resources we were provided with.--Michelle Carvajal


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:25 AM

Brazil is taking advantage of its natural resources to make themselves competitive in the global market. Today geography can change the shape of the economics around the globe. The prospect of economic growth and energy competitiveness has made them short sighted.  Brazil has to beware of becoming a mono-commodity country that relies on a business that is not sustainable.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:35 PM

While only Brazil is taking part in this and it hasn't completely replaced gasoline it is without a doubt a step in the right direction that hopefully other nations can learn from. While the hypotheses over how much oil fluctuates it is undeniable it isn't a permanent solution, the future of fuel must lie in renewal resources. Unfortunately oil companies hold so much sway in politics its unknown how much change is actually possible today. Regardless of this hopefully one day the world as a whole will realize this and seek to emulate Brazil's in innovation.

Taylor S's curator insight, March 23, 7:58 PM

It is being said that the use of Brazilian, sugarcane produced ethanol is an effective means of self-sustainable energy, more officiant then the corn produced products. the reason this relates to my 5 year plan is due to the proposal that this energy can be used to reduce the emissions given off by different industries and provide clean energy. I believe that this is important as it would reduce the type of impact these organisations have on the environment.

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Street View goes underwater

Street View goes underwater | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...


I had to rescoop this for the simple fact that it is amazing and people should take advantage of all the new technology that is coming out. This benefits everyone who is interested in learning about the life under sea and the different locations in the world that these exist.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 26, 2012 10:31 AM
This new wave of technology that is being used and introduced to society is amazing! I never thought that they could expand into the sea but it is definetly something that could be to the benefit of those who work in the field. Also, it is a great way to create lessons for children and adults on how to protect our oceans from waste. They get a glimpse as to what lies beneath the surface. Raising the bar everyday. Thank you for this article!
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 8:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 8:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
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Volcano Erupts Near Tourist Site in Guatemala

Volcano Erupts Near Tourist Site in Guatemala | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

A long-simmering volcano’s powerful eruptions outside one of Guatemala’s most famous tourist attractions on Thursday prompted evacuation orders for more than 33,000 people.

 

Volcanic activity is always closely watched and in this article I question whether or not the experts knew that in its activity it would errupt so suddenly? How much notice was given to the people who lived in the areas surrounding the volcano is unknown. We need to consider that in situations like this, where do all the evacuees go? I also wonder if in these situations there will be an effort to make the locations habitable again. It is not specifically stated that they will be able to return and not everyone was able to evacuate immediately. There is also no mention of deaths in this erruption however the distance that the particles were flying were relatively far if it was able to affect cars trying to get away.

We also have to consider that the gases that escape from a volcano when it is erupting affect not only the inhabitants of the area but also those in the surrounding cities as well. The ash, gas and droplets of sulfuric acid can affect the sun and atmosphere. Sometimes making it extremely hot because of the clash in heat coming from the eart and/ or making it extremely cold. It all depends. You also have to consider since it is a touristic site, the possibility of airplanes flying over the volcano or into an airport. If some of whats erupting were to land on an aircraft it could melt right through and cause an accident. Interesting that this happened and now it makes me wonder what other activity is going on in other volcano filled countries. -Michelle Carvajal-

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Mexico's President- Elect Wants To Modernize Pemex : NPR

Mexico's President- Elect Wants To Modernize Pemex : NPR | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

Mexico's President- elect wants to modernize Pemex...

 

I found this article interesting and the reason is because this meeting was held the day after the incident in Mexico. The president says he wants the private sector to help modernize the oil system in Mexico but doesn't want to privatize the company. My main concern in this matter is whether or not he is considering on giving these private sector jobs a break for assisting with Pemex. Meaning a lot of companies like to help but assuming that they will receive something in return.

The point of modernizing the company is to have more productivity and make it more competitive. I wonder though, competitive towards who and if it increases productivity what does this mean for the economy. Will there be more jobs offered, will it be more enviroment friendly..One of the other things I noticed is that in this article the gas leak incident was not mentioned. So now we don't know if this is something that was in the works of happening or if its simply a way to calm down the media from seeking reasons why there was a gas leak in the first place. -Michelle Carvajal-

 

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

This roughly depicts how middle eastern countries have similarities in displaying their religious mottos on their flag, share the same colors etc. We see however that Israel is clearly different. It is different in the sense that it does not share the color scheme of the other flags and it clearly states with the Star of David, that they are not of muslim faith. The other flags however share the crescent moon and scriptures on their flags. They have the same color scheme going in different patterns. The Israeli flag, in the midst of all the others, shows that the country itself and its people want to remain seperate and keep their own identity. They have for years been going against the norm and that battle continues. By staying firm in their beliefs and keeping their identity, it shows a lot about who they are as a people and gives room for a lot of discussion about them. -- M.Carvajal


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

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NYTimes Video: "A Man's World"

NYTimes Video: "A Man's World" | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
After three decades of war, Afghanistan is one of the world's widow capitals. They are ridiculed as prostitutes when they go shopping, and many are unable to rent their own homes.

 

Women are highly criticized in this country for being widowed and walking the streets alone. We know well enough by now that they are always accompanied by men and to be alone is almost like you are a prostitute or of little worth. What then, when your husband dies and you have no where to go, with no money, and no one to take care of you from harm? These women are left alone, sometimes with children that they have to feed yet they are deprived of jobs and houses. Widows in afghanistan equal up to two million. What happens with all of them? As seen in this video, many end up in shelters while they seem to get back on track. For many it is embarassing to admit that they live in a shelter. The fact that women end up in this predicament in the first place is sad. To not be able to mourn because you are too busy trying to survive is something that no one should have to do. Marriage continues to be the way out of poverty and isolation for these women. The wars have brough heartache and pain to these widows and it seems like the solution is not near at all.


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"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library

"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."   This video really resonates with my students.  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  

 

There are so many ways to make someone's day. Many cultures do not allow a woman to marry before a certain age, others are married off in arranged marriages, others do no have the chance to go to school and others are not allowed to interact with boys. Different cultures with different values and as the issue is in Kabul, the young girls represented in the video have a future where they will not be able to go outside and play or do much. This australian man has taken it upon himself to show the children of Kabul how to skateboard and has also opened a skateboarding school. His motive is the fact that during the day, the children work to help their families make a living and when they are done, they have no recreational facilities or activities. He is allowing them to interact with other children their own age and create friendships. Now tradition would be that once they grow, they will not be allowed to do these sorts of activities and in a sense its almost allowed so that they can live life knowing that at one point they did have a childhood. In a time where there are suicide bombers and so many deaths it is something that helps the children keep focus on a bright future, not matter if it will not be. This man has worked hard to bring some joy into the lives of many and he should be rewarded for his work. Many feel that in order to give, they have to receive and sometimes its just better to give. --M. Carvajal


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:33 AM

Who could have imagined, that Skateboards could be used as a geopolitical tool? Over a decade ago, the United States invaded Afghanistan with the aim of rooting out and destroying the terrorist who attacked the nation on 911. As with most of our military campaigns in the Middle East, the mission quickly became bogged down in a nation building campaign. The people of Afghanistan have long been wary of foreign influence. Empire after empire has attempted to conquer this nation, only to suffer humiliating defeats. For any chance at sustained success, the United States must win over the hearts and minds of the Afghan people. This skateboard program is a perfect tool in accomplishing that objective. The parks bring all types of youths together in the spirit of fun. They are a unifying factor amongst the youth in Afghanistan.

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Human/Environmental Interactions

To give you further understanding of what has happened in the past 30 or so years. This mismanagement of land use by the Soviet, and then by farmers has truly made a once natural resource, beauty to a barren land. A desert which once was covered by water is all that remains of the Aral Sea. As seen in this video, there are those hwo have never even seen water in this area because it is now very minimal. To know that there is no other reason to blame but people is extremely sad. People will do what they need to do to survive, but at what cost? Will we as a people continue to harm our planet and destroy our enviroment? The answer for many will be yes because we need to survive but we must also be strategic about what we are doing and how in the long run it will affect us. It has and will continue to create health issues for many. Many will die from malnutrition and as I mentioned in a previous article its due to the fact that many can not relocate. However, once there is no water or resource to create good crops I guarantee that people will find a way to move and find what they need. If all this can be prevented why not do it ahead of time? We need to start giving some importance to our natural resources. -- M. Carvajal


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 1:11 PM

This has to be one of the most telling video of an environmental disaster I have even seen.  A whole sea, 26,000 square miles, bigger than the state of West Virginia, is bascially gone due to Soviet mismanagement.  This is an environmental disaster now that the Russians do not have to deal with as it is now located in the independant country of Kazakhstan.  It effects them as well as the new countries that have come to be withthe collapse of the USSR.  Seems Russian dodged this just like Chernobyl.  This is something we need to lean from, on how not to use a natural resource until it literally has dried up.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:24 PM

The Aral Sea, located in Central Asia is a very important water source for the entire region.  Unfortunately, the Soviet Union designated this water sources as one which would provide water to rice and cotton crops, which are both very water-intensive crops.  This has resulted in desertification of the area due to the cyclical shrinking volume of the lake.  Sands and chemicals are now free to blow around, affecting people's health.  This is one of the best examples on earth of environmental exploitation due to a lack of environmental planning.  When the lake dries up, the inhabitants of the surrounding countries will be in huge trouble.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 6, 2014 10:38 PM

The Aral Sea was a source of food for the residents, as it was home to thousands of fish and water was used to irrigate crops.Also acted as a climate regulator. Therefore, its virtual disappearance has caused winters and summers are extreme.Today the drought is considered one of the greatest ecological disasters caused by man. scientists estimated that the Aral sea will disappear before 2020. A plan to expand the cultivation of cotton throughout Central Asia and thus a system of canals for irrigation that significantly decreased the amount of water reaching the Aral Sea. It angers me to see that the human has being causing many natural disasters.

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How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan

How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
The European country where Skype was born made a conscious decision to embrace the web after shaking off Soviet shackles Eesti keel | Estonian language version...

 

This article is very intersting for the mere fact that it is solely based on the benefit of the citizen. It is amazing that Estonia has made the use of the interent accessible to everyone but more importantly it is accessible anywhere. Yes, Skype was created in Estonia and ever since then the intenet has been available for people of all ages to use. It is extraordinary that you can walk 100 miles (if you can) but it is mind baffling to be able to walk 100 miles with no loss of internet connection. We know that it is annoying to lose connection however, Estonia has made it possible for you to never lose it because they have free wifi no matter where you are. Key word? FREE. How many wouldn't love to get rid of a bill like that? It is truly beneficial to Estonian citizens because they know that's money they can use for their families. A person can be proud of being an Estonian for the simple fact that they know their government is working for them. The idea of a chip ID that you can insert in any computer and access any personal information is amazing. The chip itself has no information but it is more or less a key. I wonder however, if you lose the key, do you get a replacement for free or do you have to pay? Either way it would be minimal compared to having to pay a monthly fee for internet.  -- M. Carvajal


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:03 PM

I actually like the idea of the computerized ID card.  Yes, undoubtedly from the outside looking in this does appear to have some big brother qualities but I think it's brilliant.  The card allows people to transfer money and vote.  It's also nice to see a country that doesn't just treat their internet use like a toy.  They use it to benefit their society, making it accessible to everyone in the country and not just those who can afford it. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:43 AM

Just an amazing fact to see a county that was once under the controll of the USSR for so long as come so far.  Now a part of NATO and the EU Estonia has stepped out of the control of Russia to become a virbrant place to live.  Once independant and then under the contol of the USSR at the start of WW II it has once again become a nation itself.  Also notice a very different view in the article, the people there feel this electronic system lets them keep and eye on the government and not a big brother view many people in the US have over electronic ID systems.  Is it because they have always been use to being looked at by the government, ie the USSR over the last 50 years and because we are so use to freedoms that we have had for hundreds of years?

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:04 AM

I actually had no idea that Estonia birthed Skype. It was an amazing foresight that Estonia immediately jumped into the computer and internet age, and even more surprising that you can get Wi-fi across most of the country, no matter how remote. That's something that hasn't been accomplished in even the US. They had Internet in most schools by 1997 and can even vote online!

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Putin calls for 'Eurasian Union'

Putin calls for 'Eurasian Union' | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Russian PM Vladimir Putin calls for the formation of a "Eurasian Union" of former Soviet republics, but says it will not be like the defunct USSR.

 

--Simply put it is in a way a good idea for al these former Soviet nations to come together in order to break the barrier. It is intelligent for Putin to say that there is no possible way to recreate something that is in the past, and if it were, why do that when you can make it better by taking only the concept? Politcally and economically, the aim to have a Eurasion Union could indeed serve as a positive effect and make this continent more appealing. Being able to link all these nations together and work hand in hand with them can possibly create more jobs within this continent that will create more products to be exported and likewise strengthen their economy. The fact that other nations such as Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are considering in joining shows that there is enough in this plan to have more than one country consider. There are other nations however, who seek double meaning to the intentions of a Eurasian Union and also may not want to join their government and economy into one. There is always room for doubt but if it is for the good then this could have great potential.--M. Carvajal


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:16 AM

So is this just to compete with NAFTA and the EU on an economic level?  Or is this to compete with the EU on economic, political and military level, much like the EU's EuroCorps?  Putin states thie is not a return to the USSR, but Russia has always been weary with the growing of NATO and the EU on its borders.  How about if Turkey gets int the EU right on the Russian border?  This action might move thie bloc creation even more forward and Putin might become more forceful to its creation.  No that former KGB member Putin is foreful.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:26 PM

It is more than understandable that former Soviet satelite states are weary of any kind of union with Russia. However, some sort of treaty could benefit the block, particularly an arangement like the one already held between Russia, Belarus, and Kahzakstan. An agreement that would ease travel between the two countries appears to have little downside.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:11 PM

it can hardly be considered surprising that Putin wants another version of the USSR. every other major nation has some form of organization that it is a part of, and with Russia left alone it must now desperately scrabble for some alliance or union with any other nation.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-I believe that this article is important for the simple fact that today we still see this discrimination among religion. Now, it is not necessarily said that it is a discrimantory act what is being done to the Mulsims but we can clearly see that it is close to it. The fact that 9/11 happened put the people who are a part of this religion in a tough predicamnet but people still do not see that the actions of one or a few are not of all. A country should not base their laws or try to govern their people based on their religious beliefs because if that were the case where would all the population go that were protestant or catholic? Just an example. Muslims migrate from one place to another and only look to be accepted within the community. Economically it makes sense for Muslims to be accepted for the simple fact that they create new structures for their religion, they work hard, and without offending anyone they live their lives and are a key element of population and economic growth. The fact that other countries are helping Muslims would clearly make them see that they can take their life somewhere else and bring a long with them the potential of new jobs, and more people that can give any country a higher minority rate beneficial to their economy. A good nation will realize that by having ANY race with their beliefs brings in a higher interest of people and also allows for assistance in grants etc. a country will always be diverse and if they look to change how they feel, dress or act only creates a deeper problem. What would happen if they roles were reversed? -MC

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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war.

 

-Belize given its history is already a well set off country in the sense that it remained an English speaking country though all its neighbors were spanish speaking. It is crucial to understand that many Guatemalan & Salvadoran individuals were going through their own econimic crisis and civil wars where they had to seek refuge and work somewhere else. Many of these individuals migrated to the US and others as we see in this article went to Belize. The issue I guess that is raised in this article is the fact that the spanish speaking workers have come in to this country and have not taken the time to learn the language. Rather they are more interested in convincing the employer that they can work for smaller wages and forcing the country to learn the spanish language. As a personal reference, my uncle who lives in El Salvador, left to work in belize for about 8 years. During that period he traveled back and forth between both countries and learned to speak English. He stated that it was the language most commonly spoken and that if you want to effectively communicate then you learn it. Now, it seems as though Belize is in the same situation as the US is/was. Many migrant workers come to the US, do not necessarily learn the language and work for less. It has created an unemployment surge because many employers seek people who will do the same job for less. In Belize howeve, they are too suffering an unemployment rate because these workers from Guatemala and El Salvador are outperforming the Belize citizens.

The economy should not be affected as having more individuals work for you should create a numerous amount of profit from exporting goods from Belize. At the same time we need to realize that just as the money comes in from profit it also has to be distributed to the workers and who ever is unemployed if they have a program for that. Learning a different language is not the issue, the issue is both sides learning eachothers and working together to push the country forward. - M.C

 

 


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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:18 PM

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of Belize's English-speaking population to an influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants with that of the United States. I enjoyed reading that the welcoming of immigrants by the ruling political system has done much to lessen racial tensions, with the various ethnic groups scattered along the political spectrum. This contrasts sharping with the American political spectrum, where there is a clear racial divide between conservatives and liberals. Americans could learn a lot from Belize in this regard, although the transition has been far from smooth in the nation. Although Spanish is now taught in schools as a result of the reality of the immigration wave in the country, there is some push-back from English speaking groups. Many employees of service industries are losing their jobs to those who can offer bilingual services, as well as some other economic changes as a result of the influx of new immigrants. However, the degree of this tension is a lot lower there than it is in the United States. It will be interesting to see how this debate shapes up in the future; it could very well serve as a helpful model for American politicians.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:49 AM

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:48 PM

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.

 

-This article is clear and straight to the point in giving the reader good examples of devolution and how it affects each country politically. The transfer of powers changes each country in the sense that they can each decide over their own local gov't (whichever it may be). With this each respective country can even provide funding (grants) toward their police dept, fire dept etc. What is interesting in this article however is how UK chose to stay the way it is. In a sense it is actually smart because they still have a say in matters of foreign policy and can still pass legislation according to devolved matters within the devolved government. The devolution of powers affect the regular citizen of each country how? In a positive or negative way?- M.C


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:30 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how devolution works and provides a specific example with the breaking down of power of the imperialist England and it's control into an equally represented United Kingdom. This is an example of devolution at it's best.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how devolution, which is a major part of unit 4, works. It explains it's parts and gives specific geographic examples as in the U.K. this overall relates to unit 4.

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:04 PM

Devolution is the transfer of powers from a central government to more regional power, in this case, the UK. The UK devolved its powers to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These countries have had independent parliaments since 1997. Some "reserved powers" have not been devolved from the UK such as foreign affairs, military defense, international and  economic policies. This change of power has stirred questions on public spending and tax policies, and is still a debate and event to keep your eye on.

 

I feel that devolution has many benefits that outweigh the negative consequences such as money spending. Countries can function in a more independent manner and govern themselves within their defined boundaries in a more efficient way. This topic and article gives greater insight to our political unit and provides great insight for each country's respective parliament.

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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.

 

This skyscraper that was once a symbol of wealth, in an incredible paradigm shift, has now become is occupied by squatters. The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside. A complex web of geographic factors needs to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation. The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.

 

--Already commented once before but feel as though should be rescooped in order for people to realize that to this day, people are still living in conditions that are not even suitable for the homeless yet it has become ok for people who were once promised housing.-- Michelle Carvajal


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

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Honduras Approves Private Cities Project | Honduras News – Daily News about Honduras

The reason I have scooped this article is for people to see how changes are being made in Honduras. With the approval of private cities in Honduras, there will be a change among the people, land and economy.

I personally do not know how I feel about this new project that will is going to happen in Honduras. i believe I feel this way because there is no comment stating that this private section will be created for the people already living in this area. These cities will have their own police, own mini govt, own rules/laws. It is said that the creation of these 3 major cities will provide thousands of new jobs for Hondurans.

What isnt explained is if the Hondurans who will live in this area will be the elite or poor. Whether or not they will have to pay to remain in this area, and if they will be allowed out of the gated community. Will people who live outside this gated community be able to enter to work in the companies that will be in these cities. I'm sure a further explanation will come along but for now the information to me seems vague.

From an economic stand point it seems as though it will be beneficial to those citizens but in terms of location, I'm not sure if it will affect the people in that area. I know that it is a concern as of now. thoughts? -Michelle Carvajal-

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Scooped by Michelle Carvajal
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Haiti’s National Palace Being Demolished

Haiti’s National Palace Being Demolished | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

The white French Renaissance palace, which ended up as little more than a symbol of the stalled recovery from the 2010 earthquake, will be ripped apart over the coming months and carted off.

 

I believe this article is a good read as it relates to what happens in Haiti usually after a hurricane or earthquake. As known, Haiti has barely any resources to house people with good solid homes and if the palace that once stood tall can be easily destroyed so can a house that has no building regulation on it. What I found interesting about this article is the fact that Sean Penn, an actor, runs a charity in Haiti. I'm pleased to see that we have individuals in the celebrity world who care enough to run such a program to help those less fortunate countries. Though the country is rich in history for the events that happened there in the past, I also admire the fact that they would not invest in rebuilding the palace.

Yes, it is a national historical building however the fact that the rubble will be used to fortify slum neighborhoods and land fill areas is great! There is no better way to use rubble then to try and help the local displaced people and to show that in a time such as this the material things no matter how historical are less important then the current living conditions of the nations citizens. A very interesting piece. -Michelle Carvajal-

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