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World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

It seems like this is inevitable for many megacities especially in places like Dhaka where there are no jobs unless you live in the city. One of the issues not mentioned here is the potential for crimes, murders etc. The slums are full, the conditions are getting worse. What does this mean for families that have more then two children? The water is contaminated because its used as waste water, trash and harsh chemicals go into it as well yet people who can't afford to pay have to bathe and drink from it The health issues that will come from this are many. It is hard to believe but it is happening and with the constant enviromental issues, matters will only get worse. -MC


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:21 PM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Haiti: Legacy of Disaster

Haiti: Legacy of Disaster | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Even before the earthquake Haiti's environment teetered on the brink of disaster. Brent and Craig Renaud report on the country's deforestation problems."

 

-As previously stated in another scoop I have mentioned that Haiti is indeed a very poor country in terms of its economy and way of living for the citizens there. The fact that country is stil 97% deforested is a simple way for us to see how bad the economy can get that without consideration of long term effects, people being to live off the land and create there own enviromental issues. Haiti geographically is already a target for hurricanes for its location on an island, however it is much more vulnerable because of the lack of forest and support that trees give to prevent mudslides and heavy flooding. Its neighbor country Dominican Republic is fine because they have a better economic advantage with their forest still existing and the incoming money from US citizens who send money back to their families. Haiti on the other hand is suffering because once they exhaust all possible resources, they dig for more and cut down for more. In order for there to be a growth in economy and a way of people surviving there has to be some way that they can work to earn money without having to destroy their natural resources.

People living in huts, hardly any electricity and poor nutrition is shocking because you rarely think that people still live this way. A major investment to this country for electricity and re planting of trees would benefit its people. Not only that but if there could be some form of economic gain through tourism, maybe the country would see a chance in change instead of its downhill spiral. The government needs to find a remedy for their issues and take the time to care for those who have no place to live. A solution must be available to save the country from an economic downfall as well as  a decrease in its population due to health and natural problems- M.C


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:56 PM

This is an example of how civilizations can be hovering on the brink of destruction. The earthquake was the final straw it caused collapse of the whole system. The environment became a wasteland because humans that so not have their basic needs met cannot think about long term consequences of their actions. Need is immediate. If we want to help the country it needs to be in very small doses over many years. Their situation wasn't created overnight and the solution won't happen overnight either.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:49 PM

Natural disasters occur because of two things; the environmental reason and how people react to it. This earthquake was only half the reason Haiti is in a natural disaster state. The people who don't know how to respond to such "natural disasters" are the real reason of problematic changes.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 25, 2014 10:26 AM

(Central America topic 2)

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Or in this case:

Which came first, the deforestation or the disparity?

I believe the answer can be both.

At first such a country's inhabitants might not know what devastating impacts manmade environmental changes such as deforestation can have - or, they might just have no other choice. Here disparity comes first. But unfortunately such effects can be far reaching. Deforestation can 'come back around' and be the cause (not only the result) of disparity: erosion, flooding, landslides, lack of natural resources. These all contribute to further disasters and crises, which continue the repeating trend.

Dr. Bonin has held classes pertaining to this same issue of deforestation, among the other issues which Haitians face. IN addition, the company I work for has been sponsoring a campaign to help humanitarian efforts in the country, and I have worked with people who have lived there.

Lastly, I can't help but notice an uncanny similarity between the deforestation of Haiti and that of Easter Island. I hope Easter Is. will be used as a warning message.

 

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 

This clip is brimming with classroom potential.  Development is a key component to this clip, but it could also become a service learning project as students adopt a great project to help others in more difficult financial situations.  Learn more about the project at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/


Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

This is absolutely amazing...to see how people think of new innovative ways to create simple gadgets that will serve as a source for them to live by. The fact that prices for certain services push people to find new ways of receiving the same service is sad but at the same time it stimulates people to try. I am fascinated at how much a person can do with their two hands. Very nice. - M. Carvajal

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:31 AM

This is another source about the use of recycled soda bottles as light sources in the Philippines.  This idea amazes me because it shows what people are capable of doing to help themselves and others in impoverished places.  It is such a simple yet amazingly important initiative.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:32 PM

The term "one man's trash is another man's treasure" is brought to new light with this video. Increased urbanization in the Philippines is creating a landscape of small, wall-to-wall huts with no windows. The lack of natural light coupled with limited energy resources makes these houses incredibly dark on the inside. One man figured out an ingenious  way to battle this issue while also reusing materials that otherwise would be considered trash. By using plastic soda bottles and a bleach solution, this man has created a type of skylight, providing light to those living in the slums of Philippines. 

 

This project has incredible potential not just in the Philippines, but on a global scale. Self-help housing all over the world could benefit from a light source while decreasing local problems with plastic waste.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

This is very interesting because it shows the percentage of females that are likely to advance with an education and not contract aids. It also shows the percentage of females that do end up with AIDS because of the lack of education they receive. However, we must consider that in any third world country there is some type of knowledge about what deadly diseases are no matter how "uneducated" a female (person) can be. Many say that it is up to schools to educate people on the diseases that exist and though this may be true, now it seems like HIV/AIDS is known world wide. Many females that do end up dropping out of school are because they indeed become pregnant at an age where they have to work. Though educated women will provide the valuable information to their children about how to protect themselves, it is inevitable that an accident may happen where blood may be swapped or even worse there is some sexual interaction with a person carrying the disease. No matter how advanced we may feel to be, no matter how knowledgeable a person is, we run the risk at any given moment. I agree that education is key, the educated women will know more then one who doesn't, but lets not leave everything to schooling. I learned about HIV/AIDS through my parents who also knew about it from their parents. So its information that can be passed down as well. None the less it was informative. --M.Carvajal     


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.

 

This skyscraper that was once a symbol of wealth, in an incredible paradigm shift, has now become is occupied by squatters. The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside. A complex web of geographic factors needs to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation. The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.

 

--Already commented once before but feel as though should be rescooped in order for people to realize that to this day, people are still living in conditions that are not even suitable for the homeless yet it has become ok for people who were once promised housing.-- Michelle Carvajal


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:58 PM

This is an amazing story of renewal. I think that is beautiful people who might otherwise be on the street have found refuge in this tower. A building can have so many uses and it is inspirational to see people coming together and the determination of the human spirit. It is hard not to think about what a positive impact this building must have had on it's occupants.