Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

 

-The fact that Venice is slowly sinking is not surprising as here in the US we have our own states with cities that are easily affected by hurricanes etc due to their sea level. The interesting point about Venice is however, that they began to build a wall with gate that would close off the rising sea level to Venice and prevent it from possibly flooding during an event where the water would try to get in. In the article it is stated that the wall/gate itself is sinking as well every year as the ground sinks. Now, these expensive flood walls will need to be patched as the sink in order to keep the height at a level where it will still protect the city. To what extent will this continue is uncertain and can the flooding plus the sinking eventually ruin Venice forever?  I believe that the city was originally made this way to allow the import and export of goods as it was easier to transport from one side of venice to the other through water. With this being said, it was easier for people to stand by and buy off the boat/gandola and for the merchant it was easier to hand up as well. This being my opinion, reasons could have been different and the thought of what could potentially happen to the city were probably no where near. We still have to take into consideration that no matter how profitable it may have been to have a city with water streets, it created a liability for the people that reside in this area. - M.C


Via Seth Dixon