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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

This is very interesting because it shows the percentage of females that are likely to advance with an education and not contract aids. It also shows the percentage of females that do end up with AIDS because of the lack of education they receive. However, we must consider that in any third world country there is some type of knowledge about what deadly diseases are no matter how "uneducated" a female (person) can be. Many say that it is up to schools to educate people on the diseases that exist and though this may be true, now it seems like HIV/AIDS is known world wide. Many females that do end up dropping out of school are because they indeed become pregnant at an age where they have to work. Though educated women will provide the valuable information to their children about how to protect themselves, it is inevitable that an accident may happen where blood may be swapped or even worse there is some sexual interaction with a person carrying the disease. No matter how advanced we may feel to be, no matter how knowledgeable a person is, we run the risk at any given moment. I agree that education is key, the educated women will know more then one who doesn't, but lets not leave everything to schooling. I learned about HIV/AIDS through my parents who also knew about it from their parents. So its information that can be passed down as well. None the less it was informative. --M.Carvajal     


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
She was one of the world's most famous faces, yet no one knew who she was. Her image appeared on the front of magazines and books, posters, lapel pins, and even rugs, but she didn't know it.

 

It is amazing that so many are photographed and used in articles, magazines, and for class presentations however no one really every takes the time to know who all these people are. I had seen this photograph during my middle and high school years but never knew who she was. It is fascinating that after twenty years she was found once again however the once young face is now aged and more than what it should be. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and its important people know that..I must say that it is sad to see that people who live in refugee camps are so affected by the weather and living conditions. I'm assuming that there are many who never knew who she was, where she was from, and didn't care to know. I always wondered however if she ever received any of the money that was earned from the repeated use of her photographs. As its stated in the article she claimed that she is "looked after". We see that muslim faith and traditions are still  instilled in this area. She had to be granted permission by her family to be able to speak to the photographer once again. It proves that certain traditions will always continue to exist and it gives us a better sense of how faiths continue to control certain aspects of people's lives. Not that it is a bad thing but its good that we see this. - M. Carvajal


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.

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Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Many take for granted the privelege of driving. For some, they consider it a right as a citizen of XYZ country. Saudi women however, see it as a necessity in certain cases and in other cases they do not want said privelege. It shows how strict the laws over women are in Saudi Arabia that in the age we're in, they are still denied the simplest of things. The fear is that woman will become independent. They will start looking for jobs and having the mentality that they can do anything and do not have to rely on a man. This is something that most men fear in Saudi Arabia and want to prevent from happening. This would bring a new more westernized culture which clearly goes against all their traditions.

From a political standpoint many feel as though the right to vote for women will never happen. That Kng Abdullah can change his mind or his successor may go back on his word by 2015. What if does go through with his word? Is he possibly trying to score points with the female population so that they do vote for his successor and others? This is something to ponder. In all, I believe it will take time for the change to happen as it did here in the US, but it would be economically beneficial if the traditions were not so strict and women could be entitled to work in areas where men were not needed. M.Carvajal


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:54 PM

It seems odd that women can vote but not drive an automobile. It appears the King does not want women to explore the country freely. He may not want to give women all that freedom at one time… Also, he must not want women traveling and exploring areas alone in a car. Although the entire situation in Saudi Arabia is sad, this appears to be a small step forward for women. 

James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:04 PM

(Central Asia topic 5 [independent topic])

The decrees made by Saudi Arabia's King regarding women's future rights are being viewed as empty promises. On top of that, this topic is at the convergence of not just political, but also social and religious topics. Political, social, economic, and religious interests are all tugging issues such as women's rights to vote and drive in different directions.

I am surprised this article did not mention something which I had heard before: the Saudi government still does not allow women to drive not only out of social custom, but also because their highways are facing a congestion problem. Giving women drivers licenses could roughly double the number of cars on the already-gridlocked roads, making commuting and transportation even more of a hassle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:51 PM

What I find interesting is that allowing women to vote seems like a big step towards equality but it may be more superficial at addressing the real issue at hand. Women in this country are living with so much constraint, letting them vote may not be the giant step forward it seems to be. There are still cultural and institutional barriers that restraint the freedom and natural rights of women.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library

"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."   This video really resonates with my students.  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  

 

There are so many ways to make someone's day. Many cultures do not allow a woman to marry before a certain age, others are married off in arranged marriages, others do no have the chance to go to school and others are not allowed to interact with boys. Different cultures with different values and as the issue is in Kabul, the young girls represented in the video have a future where they will not be able to go outside and play or do much. This australian man has taken it upon himself to show the children of Kabul how to skateboard and has also opened a skateboarding school. His motive is the fact that during the day, the children work to help their families make a living and when they are done, they have no recreational facilities or activities. He is allowing them to interact with other children their own age and create friendships. Now tradition would be that once they grow, they will not be allowed to do these sorts of activities and in a sense its almost allowed so that they can live life knowing that at one point they did have a childhood. In a time where there are suicide bombers and so many deaths it is something that helps the children keep focus on a bright future, not matter if it will not be. This man has worked hard to bring some joy into the lives of many and he should be rewarded for his work. Many feel that in order to give, they have to receive and sometimes its just better to give. --M. Carvajal


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:25 PM

This is an inspirational video it is very powerful to see someone trying to make life better. The young Australian man that has created this program should be applauded. Watching this video you can tell that this simple gesture brings so much joy to these children. One feeling that comes to mind is yes countries can seem different but they can also seem familiar. These children are just like any others they want to play and have fun. I think this is a wonderful program for them to help them forget about the dangerous world they live in.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.