MLC Geo400 class portfolio
250 views | +0 today
Follow
MLC Geo400 class portfolio
World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.

Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

This is absolutely mind boggling. How were people supposed to survive this in the first place? The interesting point about this is that London in majority of its areas does not seem like it was ever hit by so many bombs to begin with. It puts into perspective just how a place can be affected and how it can improve and move on from those events. Incredible.

more...
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 7:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:30 PM

This map shows just how devastating the bombs were on London. At first glance, this does not look like a map of the bombs dropped. It would not be until it was labeled as such would it show the results of the war on London. Very few areas were unaffected and the majority of London was hit.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb

Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
360° panoramic photography by Harbert F. Austin Jr.. Visit us to see more amazing panoramas from Japan and thousands of other places in the world.

 

A very eye opening panoramic photo of how easily one simple bomb can destroy thousands of lives in a blink of an eye. Not only this but how easily a whole landscape is transformed because of such an event. Many forget. This was literally the end of the world for many much like the tsunami that also hit in Japan. -M. Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:26 AM

The thing that always stumps me about pictures after bombings and other disasters is the reason why some things are left standing. Here we see buildings destroyed and utterly annihilated as far as the eye can see, yet the telephone poles are still standing in some areas. The picture can't capture the true scope of the destruction, but it also shows how destruction is a bit random in its own way.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:32 PM

This panoramic photograph shows the devastation of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb. Everything in sight is destroyed. Houses and poles that were lucky enough to still be standing are even lost causes. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:10 PM

These images are chilling and sad. The United States is the only country to ever use the Atomic Bomb on another country, a status I am not proud of. We can see why for 60 years people lived in constant fear during the Cold War. Also some would argue that the Atom Bomb has prevented world wars since WWII. It makes you fearful of the one leader who has access to A bombs and chooses to use them.