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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs

Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Documented by an aid worker, millions of spiders took to the trees to spin their webs after heavy floods inundated Pakistan in 2010.

 

Its interesting to see how spiders have had to change to their enviroment as the floods devastated many in 2010. Spiders have had to in a way get used to dealing with the waters but they have had a great beneficial impact on the human race. With spiders moving to higher grounds, they have been able to decrease the amount of Malaria cases which affect so many in these areas. We rarely consider how insects and animals are affected when a natural disaster hits but this was interesting to think about. Something that should be mentioned or researched is how many of these spiders can pose a threat to humans that may still be in that area? You can solved the malaria issue but hopefully not at the risk of another problem. -M.Carvajal


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:28 PM

I thought that was such a beautiful picture until I learned the tree was covered in spider webs and then it creeped me out. However it is such a good thing for the people there. Those webs will help trap the diseased mesquites. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:09 AM

This National Geographic photo is interesting as it shows spider webs wrapped around trees during the 2010 floods in Pakistan.  While it may seem weird or gross to some, the fact that there were spider webs in the trees is actually very important in a geographical context because spiders eat mosquitos, meaning the incidents of malaria were lowered during this time.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:07 AM

As cool as it is creepy. I'm reminded of entire fields of spider webs after similar heavy flooding in Australia. I certainty would get nowhere near those trees if this were to happen locally.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Video -- Dive into the Deep

Video -- Dive into the Deep | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
March 26, 2012—In a state-of-the-art submersible, National Geographic explorer-in-residence and filmmaker James Cameron reached the deepest point of the Mariana Trench, breaking a world record for the deepest solo dive.

 

For those who haven't been following National Geographic news, James Cameron (director of "Titanic" and "The Abyss") entered a submarine named DEEPSEA CHALLENGER, and dove to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the deepest point on Earth. Enjoy this video describing this "lunar-like" environment that is so deep it is lightless and near lifeless with extreme pressure. For more on the expedition, read: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/120326-james-cameron-mariana-trench-challenger-deepest-lunar-sub-science/


Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

This is amazing! I love the fact there isalways one person willing to rishk his own life just to gain more knowledge of the world we live in. The Mariana Trench is definteley a scary place and by it being the deepest trench in the world, I can see why not many would consider going down there. I am looking forward to the release of any videos that may come from this expedition he took. - M. Carvajal

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Matt Mallinson's comment, December 5, 2012 11:37 AM
Cameron is the man. Not only does he make awesome movies, but he risks his life for discovery.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 2:06 PM

When the show South Park has made an entire episode based around you, you've certainly done something extraordinary.  James Cameron not only risked his life,  but proved a point and set a new standard in underwater exploration.  In a way, he literally went to the bottom of the earth, something that has been a mystical feat until now.  With technology advancing so quickly and people constantly pushing limits and standards it makes us wonder what will be discovered next.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 2:45 AM

It is mind boggling how much of our oceans are still to be discovered. Cameron's journey here is one that needs to be taken all over the world. We have more ocean that is unexplored than explored.  We may also find some answers to fundamental questions to human existence if we are able to research the deep sea more effectively.  It is hard to believe we have been able to research 36,000 feet below and still have more questions than answers. 

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Street View goes underwater

Street View goes underwater | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...


I had to rescoop this for the simple fact that it is amazing and people should take advantage of all the new technology that is coming out. This benefits everyone who is interested in learning about the life under sea and the different locations in the world that these exist.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 26, 2012 7:31 AM
This new wave of technology that is being used and introduced to society is amazing! I never thought that they could expand into the sea but it is definetly something that could be to the benefit of those who work in the field. Also, it is a great way to create lessons for children and adults on how to protect our oceans from waste. They get a glimpse as to what lies beneath the surface. Raising the bar everyday. Thank you for this article!
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 5:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 5:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

Not only is the ocean full of diverse wildlife but the fact they have been able to camoflouge with their enviroment is amazing. Australia seems to be the home of many different types of wildlife on land and in the ocean. It would be interesting if there could be a google earth view of australias coral reefs and wildlife. - M. Carvajal

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 10:18 AM

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world, and the ecosystem that exists there is extremely delicate, as well as extremely fantastic, as seen in this article.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 2:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!