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World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Awaiting Tomorrow - People Living with HIV/AIDS in Africa

From http://www.witness.org | "Awaiting Tomorrow" tells the story people living with HIV/AIDS in the war-torn Eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo...

 

This video alone quite frankly is very touching. To see how people still live in poverty and still have the hope to live long, to make it through their adversity and more importantly to inspire others. This man lives with AIDS but he can not receive the adequate medication because his family is poor. It is sad to hear that there have been appeals to the government and head of health in the Congo to help build a center where people with Aids can go for medication. & yet no response has been given and no help is being provided. Granted the country is torn in war, but why not help those who need it seeing as this issue is affecting so many. It's not a recent issue as the man stated in the video, and all they are truly asking for is a chance to live longer than what is expected. They want to inspire others to pursue their dreams regardless of the predicament they may be in. That alone serves as motivation for anyone. Economically it may hinder but at the same time it could give the country people who will work while so many have passed due to the wars. If I saw a president who is giving someone I know the chance to live, I would work twice as hard and would vote because it proves that he/she cares for the people. -M.Carvajal


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 12:49 AM
Many more people should be aware of this clip. Here is a twenty five year old with four children, and now has been dealing with aids for one year. The likely chance of him surviving being that he is living in such poverty, is very low. It is awful to see his four children watching their father slowly die of aids, but it also can be seen as a lesson to the children to learn and become aware of aids and learn how to avoid them. This young adult not only wanted to survive but also wanted to survive to be a spokesperson to the world. I think more and more people need to be aware of situations like these. Yes, many people know Africa has a high percentage of aids but 2.6 million people in just Democratic Republic of Congo are living with aids. If people became more aware of this situation by watching videos like these and seeing how they could make an impact I think this number could be lowered. Possibly we can start by showing videos like this to adolescents and getting them knowledged in this area at a young age.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:36 PM

This video is so sad because HIV/AIDS  in the DRC and other African countries is definitely preventable and treatable but due to the immense amounts of poverty and the lack of information about contraceptives and protection, millions are infected every year.

The man featured in this video mentions that the government does nothing to help fund medical centers or any other assistance and it is truly shameful.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:17 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 

This clip is brimming with classroom potential.  Development is a key component to this clip, but it could also become a service learning project as students adopt a great project to help others in more difficult financial situations.  Learn more about the project at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/


Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

This is absolutely amazing...to see how people think of new innovative ways to create simple gadgets that will serve as a source for them to live by. The fact that prices for certain services push people to find new ways of receiving the same service is sad but at the same time it stimulates people to try. I am fascinated at how much a person can do with their two hands. Very nice. - M. Carvajal

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 2015 3:45 PM

The solution to a problem in this video owes itself to geographical factors, had this been a problem in the US, the solution would have been different.  Having said this, the "American Way" to solve problems isn't always the best way to do so.  The Philippines is a collection of islands and they are ravaged by hurricanes, so to put above ground powerlines would be highly expensive, and to connect the whole nations infrastructure would require the nation running very expensive powerlines underneath the ocean.  What the man does in this video is ingenious given the location and the solution to the problem.  Since the Philippines are a warm country and the houses only have a single roof layer, by cutting a whole in the roof taping a coke bottle into the whole (filled with water and a bit of chlorine) allows a cheap and effective source of light.  By doing this, the people will not have to spend a great deal on electricity (if it is in their region) and if they do not have electricity then they still have a source of light. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:26 PM

what a genius! of course as mentioned in class this works in the Philippines because of the tin roofs and the climate. You could not do this in cold places because the water would freeze. but this is just another sign that communities figure out ways to survive. What works in one place isn't always good for others but this sure works here.

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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

This is very interesting because it shows the percentage of females that are likely to advance with an education and not contract aids. It also shows the percentage of females that do end up with AIDS because of the lack of education they receive. However, we must consider that in any third world country there is some type of knowledge about what deadly diseases are no matter how "uneducated" a female (person) can be. Many say that it is up to schools to educate people on the diseases that exist and though this may be true, now it seems like HIV/AIDS is known world wide. Many females that do end up dropping out of school are because they indeed become pregnant at an age where they have to work. Though educated women will provide the valuable information to their children about how to protect themselves, it is inevitable that an accident may happen where blood may be swapped or even worse there is some sexual interaction with a person carrying the disease. No matter how advanced we may feel to be, no matter how knowledgeable a person is, we run the risk at any given moment. I agree that education is key, the educated women will know more then one who doesn't, but lets not leave everything to schooling. I learned about HIV/AIDS through my parents who also knew about it from their parents. So its information that can be passed down as well. None the less it was informative. --M.Carvajal     


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.