MLC Geo400 class ...
Follow
Find tag "MiddleEast"
248 views | +0 today
MLC Geo400 class portfolio
World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

It is so interesting to see the different layers and the structure of this landmark. Istanbul has been dominated by both christian and muslim faith yet this has remained. The intricate designs represent a rich historical culture. The location itself has been a basilica then a mosque and now it is a museum. Just looking for additional pictures and information about the Hagia Sophia you will see an array of architecture that is pleasing to the eye. --M. Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:59 PM

Haga Sophia is a cultural landmark that has been a Christian and Muslim holy site that all depends on who was in control of the land of that particular time. This is a great example of different times in history that use the same monument and how it plays a significant role in the people of time past and present.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:12 PM

This is a really beautiful site, and interesting since it was both a Christian and Muslim holy place.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:29 PM

This is a place of both Christian and Muslim society. It is in control by a system of sequent occupancy, meaning that who ever is in control of the area of the time is in control of the Haga Sophia. This one site shows the past of different religions and people. It tells a story of its past, present and future.  

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Viewfinder: Gaza's Tunnels

A World Report Viewfinder from inside the tunnels that connect blockaded Gaza to the outside world...

Why are tunnels from Egypt to Gaza forming?  How is Israel's policies a part of this phenomenon?

 

"It's sad to see that in order for these people to survive, they have to build these tunnels and put themselves at risk of death. Unfortunately, the situation between both countries is still at no better point then it was a few years ago. people have to build tunnels to be able to sell things withing the walls of Gaza and make a living to travel back and feed their families. The fact that this is even an option puts into perspective how people around the world struggle to survive. Understandably, Israel would have their government monitoring the tunnels and getting rid of them whenever found. The transfering in of ammunition and weapons poses a threat but at the same time, they have to see who the buyers of these goods are. You can't only blame one side if the other is supporting by buying them. The point of the video is for the viewer to understand to what extreme the issue has gotten to and to see how people put their lives in danger on a daily to be able to make a days living. Building the tunnels is dangerous as it is, now imagine having to spend majority of your day in them not knowing whether or not you will make it back home." - M.Carvajal 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:09 AM

Amazing to see what people will do to survive.  They are doing this out of necessity.  Many goods they are smuggling are what I believe should be allowed in through normal means, food, water, medicine and anything needed for basic human needs.  I understand the blockade in stopping weapons and items of that nature, but stopping basic foodstuffs is just plain wrong.  The people are living and surviving by these tunnels and built an economy on them.  One thing that was really interesting was at the end when the man seemed he wanted the blockcade to go on or else it would close his tunnel and he would have to get "a real job."  The effects of this blockcade are on both ends of the spectrum, people want it to end so things can return to normal and others want it to go on to continue to make money.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:20 PM

What some media has led the "western world" to perceive is that many of the people living here would be trying to smuggle illegal goods such as bombs, drugs, etc.  Sure that may be true in some cases, but many times there are respectable citizens which simply need food or necessary items to sustain their lives.  Because of the tight security measures regarding people and goods, the people of Gaza simply try to find a way around the authorities, and the best current option is by tunnels.  Situations like this show that if people really need certain things, with some help and determination, they can achieve that goal.  In the end, hopefully it is for good more often than bad.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:09 PM

These tunnels give the Palestinians a way to access a world that has been politically blockaded from them. Connections that allow the sharing of goods are not something that should be avoided. Food and goods could be a way to make a pseudo peace and interdependence between both sides of a centuries old conflict.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Slideshare: Middle east flags

This roughly depicts how middle eastern countries have similarities in displaying their religious mottos on their flag, share the same colors etc. We see however that Israel is clearly different. It is different in the sense that it does not share the color scheme of the other flags and it clearly states with the Star of David, that they are not of muslim faith. The other flags however share the crescent moon and scriptures on their flags. They have the same color scheme going in different patterns. The Israeli flag, in the midst of all the others, shows that the country itself and its people want to remain seperate and keep their own identity. They have for years been going against the norm and that battle continues. By staying firm in their beliefs and keeping their identity, it shows a lot about who they are as a people and gives room for a lot of discussion about them. -- M.Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library

"Skateistan" The NYTimes video library | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."   This video really resonates with my students.  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  

 

There are so many ways to make someone's day. Many cultures do not allow a woman to marry before a certain age, others are married off in arranged marriages, others do no have the chance to go to school and others are not allowed to interact with boys. Different cultures with different values and as the issue is in Kabul, the young girls represented in the video have a future where they will not be able to go outside and play or do much. This australian man has taken it upon himself to show the children of Kabul how to skateboard and has also opened a skateboarding school. His motive is the fact that during the day, the children work to help their families make a living and when they are done, they have no recreational facilities or activities. He is allowing them to interact with other children their own age and create friendships. Now tradition would be that once they grow, they will not be allowed to do these sorts of activities and in a sense its almost allowed so that they can live life knowing that at one point they did have a childhood. In a time where there are suicide bombers and so many deaths it is something that helps the children keep focus on a bright future, not matter if it will not be. This man has worked hard to bring some joy into the lives of many and he should be rewarded for his work. Many feel that in order to give, they have to receive and sometimes its just better to give. --M. Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:33 AM

Who could have imagined, that Skateboards could be used as a geopolitical tool? Over a decade ago, the United States invaded Afghanistan with the aim of rooting out and destroying the terrorist who attacked the nation on 911. As with most of our military campaigns in the Middle East, the mission quickly became bogged down in a nation building campaign. The people of Afghanistan have long been wary of foreign influence. Empire after empire has attempted to conquer this nation, only to suffer humiliating defeats. For any chance at sustained success, the United States must win over the hearts and minds of the Afghan people. This skateboard program is a perfect tool in accomplishing that objective. The parks bring all types of youths together in the spirit of fun. They are a unifying factor amongst the youth in Afghanistan.

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Many take for granted the privelege of driving. For some, they consider it a right as a citizen of XYZ country. Saudi women however, see it as a necessity in certain cases and in other cases they do not want said privelege. It shows how strict the laws over women are in Saudi Arabia that in the age we're in, they are still denied the simplest of things. The fear is that woman will become independent. They will start looking for jobs and having the mentality that they can do anything and do not have to rely on a man. This is something that most men fear in Saudi Arabia and want to prevent from happening. This would bring a new more westernized culture which clearly goes against all their traditions.

From a political standpoint many feel as though the right to vote for women will never happen. That Kng Abdullah can change his mind or his successor may go back on his word by 2015. What if does go through with his word? Is he possibly trying to score points with the female population so that they do vote for his successor and others? This is something to ponder. In all, I believe it will take time for the change to happen as it did here in the US, but it would be economically beneficial if the traditions were not so strict and women could be entitled to work in areas where men were not needed. M.Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:04 PM

(Central Asia topic 5 [independent topic])

The decrees made by Saudi Arabia's King regarding women's future rights are being viewed as empty promises. On top of that, this topic is at the convergence of not just political, but also social and religious topics. Political, social, economic, and religious interests are all tugging issues such as women's rights to vote and drive in different directions.

I am surprised this article did not mention something which I had heard before: the Saudi government still does not allow women to drive not only out of social custom, but also because their highways are facing a congestion problem. Giving women drivers licenses could roughly double the number of cars on the already-gridlocked roads, making commuting and transportation even more of a hassle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:51 PM

What I find interesting is that allowing women to vote seems like a big step towards equality but it may be more superficial at addressing the real issue at hand. Women in this country are living with so much constraint, letting them vote may not be the giant step forward it seems to be. There are still cultural and institutional barriers that restraint the freedom and natural rights of women.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:40 AM

This decision is absolutely meaningless. Elections matter little in Saudi Arabia. The nation is an Absolute Monarchy. The Kings word on all issues is absolute. On the other hand driving a car, is a much more important symbol of freedom. Allowing women to drive, would give them a sense of mobility. Driving in all most every culture is associated with independence. The car allows you to travel anywhere you want, and avoids the trap of relying on others for transportation. By driving a car, you essentially achieve a certain level of independence. By keeping women from driving, you keep them from achieving independence, and force them to be dependent on the males in their lives.    

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Palestinian Loss of Land

Palestinian Loss of Land...

 

This video is very informative for those who did not know that Palestine really exists. There are many who are led by the search engines on the web and believe that Palestine is just a place made up by someone, or that it is located within other Islamic countries. Through the years Palestine has lost its land but we must remember that at one point that land also belonged to Israel. This battle between religion and people has led to a constant feud over land. A certain amount of years it belongs to one and then the other claims/reclaims it. It's wishful thinking to one day see the land split equally between both. I believe this video is good for those who do not know how much land belonged to who, how it is lost, and where it is located. It seems as though Israel has control over the land at this moment in time but we also have to consider what may happen in the future and whether or not it will be reclaimed by Palestine. This video gives people something to research and find out the real facts behind this little land strip. M. Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:44 PM

Interesting that they showed a map of 1886.  Palestine didn't exits in 1886 either, it was under control of the Ottoman Empire and the Ottoman Turks.  Egypy controlled this area at one time, around 3000BC, Then there was a Kingdom of Israle around 1050 BC, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Macedonains, Romans, Byzantines, Sassanids, Muslims of the Caliphates, Seljuks, Europeans during the Crusades, Saladin, Ottomans, Europeans again after WW I, then the state of Israel after the end of WW 2 all controlled this area.  This area has been under control of many different rulers, empires and cultures.  I know I must have missed some.  It is not as simple as Palestininians lossing land, the issue goes wat back before anyone today cares ot even remember.  If Im right there was never a state called Palestine under modern times, but there was a Kingdom of Israel.  I know that is not a justification for the right to exist or not exits, but it shows a history of a nation of Israel.  If the Palestinian people want a state, why don't they recognize that Israel has the same right?  One that might be grounded in history more than theirs.  I do believe the Palestinians have the right to  state, but they need to recognize that Israel has the same right that they want. 

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

TED Talk: Readings of the Qu'ran

Lesley Hazleton explores the Quran and finds much that is quite different from what is reported in commonly cited accounts. A psychologist by training and Mi...

 

This video was excellent because it shows how many things when translated are lost or misquoted. Can't really say much as I myself have never read the Qu'ran. I do not intend to say that she is entirely right with her presentation nor say that she is wrong. From her perspective however, I did enjoy that she seems to have done some research, and in the end she states something very true. Whenever you translate something, more often then not, something will be misquoted and/or omitted.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:04 PM

Interesting video. We also see how interpretations can be warped with the Quran but that is not exclusive to this one text. The Bible for instance falls victim to the same circumstances.