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Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

This article is interesting because from the perspective of the two women interviewed, it does not seem like they are sad or worried that they are the "leftovers" of society. In fact, they hold themselves to high standard and believe that they can still find someone who will meet their expectations. This is because they are normally well employed and well educated. Many women are also called "leftovers" because they are in their late 20's or in their 30's. Men seek younger women but you also have to understand that because of the one-child policy, finding a woman could also be very hard. There are more men in the rural areas who are also staying single because the availability of women & "leftover" women is for those men who have a steady career and a good income. Not only this, while very few want to marry for love, the reality is, you need to have something to offer a woman for them to marry you. Many are interested in cars, homes, bank accounts etc.

As prices have increased in China for apartments, homes and other necessities a person from a rural area who farms for a living would not be able to "impress" someone who lives in the city. Even if the woman lives in a rural area, she is most likely trying to get out of poverty and would not take you on an offer for marriage. Basically what we can take away from this article is that because of the economic necessity, many women are in higher paying jobs that require them to seek someone of equal or higher pay, and others are waiting for the "one." - M.Carvajal


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted. 

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-I believe that this article is important for the simple fact that today we still see this discrimination among religion. Now, it is not necessarily said that it is a discrimantory act what is being done to the Mulsims but we can clearly see that it is close to it. The fact that 9/11 happened put the people who are a part of this religion in a tough predicamnet but people still do not see that the actions of one or a few are not of all. A country should not base their laws or try to govern their people based on their religious beliefs because if that were the case where would all the population go that were protestant or catholic? Just an example. Muslims migrate from one place to another and only look to be accepted within the community. Economically it makes sense for Muslims to be accepted for the simple fact that they create new structures for their religion, they work hard, and without offending anyone they live their lives and are a key element of population and economic growth. The fact that other countries are helping Muslims would clearly make them see that they can take their life somewhere else and bring a long with them the potential of new jobs, and more people that can give any country a higher minority rate beneficial to their economy. A good nation will realize that by having ANY race with their beliefs brings in a higher interest of people and also allows for assistance in grants etc. a country will always be diverse and if they look to change how they feel, dress or act only creates a deeper problem. What would happen if they roles were reversed? -MC

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Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 2014 12:29 PM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

It is understandable to see where Latvians are coming from. For many, its the only thing that they can hold on to: Culture. Latvians feel as though they should be able to hold on to their own language and shouldn't have to learn another if they are in an area where they all speak the same. It almost relates to how cultural identity is perceived here in the US. Many feel as though they do not need to learn spanish for this was an english speaking country. & there are others who believe that languages are forced on them. The issue will always remain however, in a place where majority of the people speak Russian it would be wise for everyone to atleast make it a language you can learn about it in school at your own discretion. Imposing it as a national language is indeed hindering those who do not speak it and who are possibly older in age to learn it. That takes away from people having the right to chose what they want to learn and identify with. --M. Carvajal

 

For more on the vote, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17083397    


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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:14 AM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 8:37 PM

It was interesting to read that in order to become a Latvian citizen you need to speak Latvian.I can see the point of view from both sides.Russian speaking residents want to be treated equally and Latvian citizens want to keep their cultural identity. However it does seem that there may be some deeper issues of discrimination that a unified language may not eliminate completely.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 5, 4:54 PM

About 35 percent of Latvia's population (5,000,000) contains Russian ancestors. Russia does not want to give Latvia credit for practicing Russian languages and the Russian heritage because Russian feels like since they take up about 11% of the world, they don't need to share their heritage with any other country. It's kind of like copyright laws that Russia seems to have.