MLC Geo400 class portfolio
258 views | +0 today
Follow
MLC Geo400 class portfolio
World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Worker safety in China

This video is absolutely phenomenal in the sense that it provides its viewers with a look into what many do for a daily living that is most likely less than $3 a day. (not saying that this is the case here) We also have to see how China is blatantly cutting corners by not implementing worker safety regulations. This alone saves them the money that they would not have to pay for any injuries on the job. Risking lives for a very low income and to live in a bad enviroment hardly seems worth it but for many this is what they NEED to do in order to put food on the table. Now, it isn't only China that has gone through this. Many countries have started off this way and later incorporated regulations that they must abide by. China however, has a booming economy in which it should worry about its workers since they are they ones who are building/demolishing in order to create better locations for companies to occupy. In a government where your whole ambition is to gain money and interest, the lives of a few are not important (or so it seems). -M.Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:45 PM

China has one of the strongest economies in the world. However, I think sometimes, China takes that for granted. They think that just because they have a strong economy, they don't have to worry about safe working environments and they have nothing to lose if something happens to someone. As much as I'm sure China gives good paychecks to manufactured workers because of its wealth, there are some jobs, such as this one, that they think they don't have to pay enough. However at the same time, it's not China's fault. Sometimes, it's the workers faults for not using common sense while working, I'm a firm believer in "work smarter, not harder."

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:32 PM

Well nobody ever accused China of being a Union favoring country.  These people are risking their lives because its their job.  This is a country where you have very little leeway to argue for benefits.  If they want to do this, then come to the US.  Although I wonder why they don't just use dynamite?  Faster and few people are involved.  

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:37 PM

Based on the video and the safety of the Chinese workers they tame no precautions to staying safe. If they have this much lack of safety for themselves then how do they regard the safety of the people around them. As China is and has cities up and coming to mega cities with high rises and exponential expanding then how do they create their buildings? As fast as they went up and the city was created then how stable are their buildings?

Rescooped by Michelle Carvajal from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

This article is interesting because from the perspective of the two women interviewed, it does not seem like they are sad or worried that they are the "leftovers" of society. In fact, they hold themselves to high standard and believe that they can still find someone who will meet their expectations. This is because they are normally well employed and well educated. Many women are also called "leftovers" because they are in their late 20's or in their 30's. Men seek younger women but you also have to understand that because of the one-child policy, finding a woman could also be very hard. There are more men in the rural areas who are also staying single because the availability of women & "leftover" women is for those men who have a steady career and a good income. Not only this, while very few want to marry for love, the reality is, you need to have something to offer a woman for them to marry you. Many are interested in cars, homes, bank accounts etc.

As prices have increased in China for apartments, homes and other necessities a person from a rural area who farms for a living would not be able to "impress" someone who lives in the city. Even if the woman lives in a rural area, she is most likely trying to get out of poverty and would not take you on an offer for marriage. Basically what we can take away from this article is that because of the economic necessity, many women are in higher paying jobs that require them to seek someone of equal or higher pay, and others are waiting for the "one." - M.Carvajal


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted.