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Mixed American Life
Mixed Heritage, Mixed Culture,  Mixed Identity | mixedamericanlife.us
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How we remember a paler shade of black - IOL Lifestyle | IOL.co.za

How we remember a paler shade of black - IOL Lifestyle | IOL.co.za | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it

Successful black people are remembered as having a lighter skin tone than they actually have, according to a new US study.

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9 Things I Want to Say (But Don’t) to Your Curious Yet Racially-Charged Microaggressions Against Me & My Children

9 Things I Want to Say (But Don’t) to Your Curious Yet Racially-Charged Microaggressions Against Me & My Children | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it
Grace Biskie knows you're just curious, but for the sake of her sons, please keep your curiosity to yourself.
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diane gusa's curator insight, January 6, 8:41 PM
Soci 300's insight:

     Microagressions are more common then generally believed. They target differences seen by the naked eye, but truely expose the individual looking. In some instances people are just trying to be friendly and connect, but in others their perception of implicit bias get the better of them ~insight by one of my students.

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The Tragic Mulatto Myth

The Tragic Mulatto Myth | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it

Lydia Maria Child introduced the literary character that we call the tragic mulatto1 in two short stories: "The Quadroons" (1842) and "Slavery's Pleasant Homes" (1843). She portrayed this light skinned woman as the offspring of a white slaveholder and his black female slave. This mulatto's life was indeed tragic. She was ignorant of both her mother's race and her own. She believed herself to be white and free. Her heart was pure, her manners impeccable, her language polished, and her face beautiful. Her father died; her "negro blood" discovered, she was remanded to slavery, deserted by her white lover, and died a victim of slavery and white male violence. A similar portrayal of the near-white mulatto appeared in Clotel(1853), a novel written by black abolitionist William Wells Brown.

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