Mixed American Life
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Mixed American Life
Mixed Heritage, Mixed Culture,  Mixed Identity | mixedamericanlife.us
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WATCH: 'You Can Touch My Hair' Short Film

WATCH: 'You Can Touch My Hair' Short Film | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it
Remember that time a group of black women stood in the middle of New York City's Union Square holding signs inviting people to touch their hair? Yup, that really happened.
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Halle Berry's Baby and the Resurgence of the Tragic Mulatto

Halle Berry's Baby and the Resurgence of the Tragic Mulatto | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it
The furor caused by Berry's assertion that her daughter is black reminds us how confused Americans remain about race.
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Tonya Braddox's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:28 PM

There are many fictional books that have multiracial characters that do not embrace the "tragic mulatto" type.  Instead, the characters proudly embrace all things that are a part of them.  We define who we are; it is not anyone's place to define or assign you an identity.  So, if Halle Berry identifies as Black, so be it.  There is nothing wrong with being Black and identifying with black cultures.  Yes, I said "black cultures" because part of the problem is how media and scholars alike have "boxed in" what it means to be Black in America and around the world.  One more thing, at the core of the problem is many people have not learned to embrace diverseness in what has been labeled Different, Other, Alterity.  

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How Diversity Will Alter Black History 

How Diversity Will Alter Black History  | Mixed American Life | Scoop.it

(The Root)—“All American history has always been multiracial, at least certainly since the early 1600s,” Blackmon told The Root. “It’s not a question of whether there has been a multiracial history, but whether it’s been acknowledged or specifically understood."

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Tonya Braddox's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:41 PM

Yes, multiracials have been a part of American history for a very long time.  Yes, we need to continue to explore and document our people's experiences.  But, to say that we will stop talking about race, racism, and the system of slavery when we are all light brown ignores the deep and complex way in which we've been socialized to perceive ourselves through the eyes of others.  The author says, "you'll see." Yes, "we'll see" that the future light-browns of America will ask similar questions as to their identities and cultures.  It is a human act to want to know who we are, where we come from, and why someone looks slightly different from us. (This is how we explore our world.)  I think the questions will always be there and how we choose to answer these questions will determine if we truly value ourselves and those we encounter.  I seriously doubt that we will ever have a post racial society.