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Rescooped by Ed Ross from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
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Young Girl Given Bioengineered Windpipe Dies - New York Times

Young Girl Given Bioengineered Windpipe Dies - New York Times | Miscellaneous Med | Scoop.it
Young Girl Given Bioengineered Windpipe Dies
New York Times
The goal of regenerative medicine, or tissue engineering, is to create or regrow tissues and organs to ease transplant shortages or treat conditions that do not have an effective cure.

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, July 8, 2013 2:25 AM

The bioengineered windpipe operation  had also involved surgery on the girl’s esophagus, which never healed properly. She underwent another operation a month ago to correct the problem and unfortunately, died from complications arising from the second operation.

Pete Shuster's curator insight, July 11, 2013 8:34 AM

More new from the world of regenerative medicine...so close; yet so far.

Rescooped by Ed Ross from Dental Implant and Bone Regeneration
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BioElectronics Announces Chronic and Postoperative Wound Care Product Distribution in Italy

BioElectronics Announces Chronic and Postoperative Wound Care Product Distribution in Italy | Miscellaneous Med | Scoop.it

BioElectronics Corporation , the maker of unique inexpensive, patented, technological solutions for chronic and post-operative wound care, announced today that it has begun distribution in Italy of its RecoveryRx(TM) product line with Biomax Spa (www.biomax.it).


Via Alessandro Dentoni
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Rescooped by Ed Ross from Amazing Science
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Scientists identify cells that could hold the secret to limb regeneration

Scientists identify cells that could hold the secret to limb regeneration | Miscellaneous Med | Scoop.it

The failure to replace damaged body parts in adult mammals results from a muted growth response and fibrotic scarring. Although infiltrating immune cells play a major role in determining the variable outcome of mammalian wound repair, little is known about the modulation of immune cell signaling in efficiently regenerating species such as the salamander, which can regrow complete body structures as adults. A comprehensive analysis of immune signaling during limb regeneration in axolotl, an aquatic salamander, revealed a temporally defined requirement for macrophage infiltration in the regenerative process. Although many features of mammalian cytokine/chemokine signaling are retained in the axolotl, they are more dynamically deployed, with simultaneous induction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers within the first 24 h after limb amputation. Systemic macrophage depletion during this period resulted in wound closure but permanent failure of limb regeneration, associated with extensive fibrosis and disregulation of extracellular matrix component gene expression. Full limb regenerative capacity of failed stumps was restored by reamputation once endogenous macrophage populations had been replenished. Promotion of a regeneration-permissive environment by identification of macrophage-derived therapeutic molecules may therefore aid in the regeneration of damaged body parts in adult mammals.

 

Salamanders are unique in the vertebrate world as they're capable of repairing their hearts, tails, spinal cords, brain, and regrowing limbs. This makes them an obvious candidate for regenerative research. Godwin and the team at ARMI removed the macrophages the Salamanders and found that the animals were no longer able to regenerate limbs. He believes that the cells release chemicals that are vital to the Salamanders' regenerative powers. More research is needed to establish exactly how regeneration works, and Godwin is currently conducting experiments to investigate. "This really gives us somewhere to look for what might be secreted into the wound environment that allows for regeneration," he says.

 

Although understanding the Salamander's abilities may one day lead to impossible-sounding feats like limb regeneration in humans, there are more-immediate benefits that could come from the research. Less ambitious goals such as scarless healing, could be attainable. "The long-term plan is that we'll know exactly what cocktail to add to a wound site to allow salamander-like regeneration under hospital conditions."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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