Miscellaneous Fun Stuff
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Miscellaneous Fun Stuff
sometimes funny, sometimes fun, sometimes NSFW
Curated by Scott Greer
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100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015

100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015 | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it

Tags: K12, map, map archives.
It's time to present the most interesting interactive maps that came to our attention in 2015


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 12:58 PM

There is bound to be something that you will find useful/insightful in this year-end list part I and part II).

 

Tags: map, map archives.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, January 23, 4:50 PM

Such a great collection of interactive and beautiful maps, hours of entertainment for the North American APHUG nerdus domesticus.

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Downloadair: download your photos from flickr

Downloadair: download your photos from flickr | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it

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Laura Brown's curator insight, July 29, 2015 5:37 PM

It seems to be working so far. I've started loading my sets from Flickr back onto my hard drive. I have years worth of photos on Flickr and it has been bothering me that I don't have a back up plan for them (should Yahoo! suddenly decide to drop Flickr).

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Photographer Illustrates The Beauty In Abandon And Decay In Stunning Urbex Collection - DIY Photography

Photographer Illustrates The Beauty In Abandon And Decay In Stunning Urbex Collection - DIY Photography | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
How is it that when an average person spots the decrepit remnants of a building that is long past it’s days of glory, they find it repulsive, spooky even. But, when a photographer like Rebecca Litchfield (previously here and here) comes across such remains, they are capable of seeing something much brighter, more beautiful than [...]

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Canada: Random and Cool Canadian Facts About This Country

Canada:  Random and Cool Canadian Facts About This Country | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
The topic of Canada is as broad as is the country is vast and diverse. Canada is world renowned for its friendliness, cultural diversity, peaceful nature, sprawling lands, fresh air and natural beauty. There is much to discover about this great country and with every page turned, there is something new to learn.

French explorer, Jacques Cartier, named the land “Canada”. The name “Canada” is derived from the word “Kanata”, which has its origins from the Huron and Iroquois languages...
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English Teacher Gets Last Laugh After Student Posts ‘F*CK YOU’ Letter (Image)

English Teacher Gets Last Laugh After Student Posts ‘F*CK YOU’ Letter (Image) | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
An English teacher at McKinley High School (unspecified city) offered up an EPIC response to a letter that, according to Reddit, was taped to his or her door by
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This teacher handled the situation so well.

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Honest Slogans

Honest Slogans | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
what people really think
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This made me laugh. Slightly biting, slightly nasty, but often on target.

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20 Funny Street Signs From Around The World

20 Funny Street Signs From Around The World | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Some of the most hilarious traffic signs from around the world. How do they come up with this stuff?

Via PebbleInTheStillWaters
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John Zinga's curator insight, October 19, 2013 7:23 PM

Just some good fun for Saturday Night . Enjoy a great laugh and keep an eye out for these signs .  LOL

Human Interest Agency- Child Support Enforcement's curator insight, July 15, 2015 1:08 PM

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Visit Our Website For Success Stories, Frequently Asked Questions, Arrearage Calculators or apply online!

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 6, 6:28 AM

Laughter is good medicine!

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40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School

By the time we graduate high school, we learn that they never taught us the most interesting things in there.
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Facebook connections map the world

Facebook connections map the world | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Facebook intern Paul Butler has created a detailed map of the world by mapping connections between people using the social network living in different cities.

Via Seth Dixon
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Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:25 PM

This is a picture of our world and the real way that we are connected in real time from Facebook. It's amazing! Share this everywhere!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

This map amazes me because of just how big Facebook has become after starting as a small site for college kids in the U.S. to connect on.  Now it is one of the largest contributing factors to globalization as it allows people from various continents to connect to others with a simple Internet connection.  It has helped people of different cultures come together and as we saw in class, it helps spread word of different political happenings that regular news media tries to hide from us.  

It's also really interesting to see how China is completely off the grid and so is central and Saharan Africa because in terms of modern day globalization, they are not areas that participate in many global affairs and with the prominence Facebook holds in today's world, the parts of the world that are missing are much stranger to us in cultural terms.

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:26 AM

Global networks

 

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Flags of Every Country

Flags of Every Country | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
This map shows Flags of every country in the world. Flag description produced from actual flags or the best information available at the time the entry was written.
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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
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Great British eccentrics - Telegraph

Great British eccentrics - Telegraph | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Britain has been home to some of history's more colourful characters.
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Eccentricity is something looked down upon for some reason. There are times to embrace it...."vote insanity...you know it makes sense."

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Just making sure you were paying attention...


Via Seth Dixon
Scott Greer's insight:

All you need to know is that it is John Oliver....he's funny.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2015 4:39 PM

Because it's funny; that's why. 

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:26 AM

This is a pretty funny clip.

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We should host the Olympics in the same place every time

We should host the Olympics in the same place every time | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
The Olympics are bad for cities. So why do we keep asking new places to invest billions of dollars in state-of-the-art stadiums they’ll never use again?


The game of the Games is rigged, with the IOC bearing no cost but reaping great profits. The competition is designed to force cities to bid ever upward, proposing state-of-the-art projects that they might not even need. Because of the mounting price tag, the vast majority of countries could never afford to host the Games. We need a new model, and I think the solution is obvious. We should build the Summer Olympics a permanent home.


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Dee Dee Deeken's curator insight, August 2, 2015 1:27 PM

Urban Geographer John Rennie Short writes an intriguing Olympic proposal, with the idea of fixing the broken economic model (for hosts) as well as the Greek economy.  He is author of the fabulous new textbook Human Geography: A Short Introduction;  you can hear how he wanted to bring a new voice to geography students that would excitement an intellectual vitality to their studies.  You can preview the supplemental resources and digital exercises for this engaging new textbook here. 


Tags: sport, popular culture, urban, economic, APHG, textbook.

Chris Sterry's curator insight, August 3, 2015 10:27 AM

Urban Geographer John Rennie Short writes an intriguing Olympic proposal, with the idea of fixing the broken economic model (for hosts) as well as the Greek economy.  He is author of the fabulous new textbook Human Geography: A Short Introduction;  you can hear how he wanted to bring a new voice to geography students that would excitement an intellectual vitality to their studies.  You can preview the supplemental resources and digital exercises for this engaging new textbook here. 


Tags: sport, popular culture, urban, economic, APHG, textbook.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 5, 2015 2:42 AM

Urban Geographer John Rennie Short writes an intriguing Olympic proposal, with the idea of fixing the broken economic model (for hosts) as well as the Greek economy.  He is author of the fabulous new textbook Human Geography: A Short Introduction;  you can hear how he wanted to bring a new voice to geography students that would excitement an intellectual vitality to their studies.  You can preview the supplemental resources and digital exercises for this engaging new textbook here. 


Tags: sport, popular culture, urban, economic, APHG, textbook.

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100 Years of National Geographic Maps

100 Years of National Geographic Maps | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Since 1915, National Geographic cartographers have charted earth, seas, and skies in maps capable of evoking dreams.

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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 5, 2015 12:35 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 5, 2015 5:17 AM

Beautiful article on an amazing organisation - the history of maps and map-making tells us so much about how people have viewed the world through history - great for year 7.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:32 AM

All I can say is: WOW. I loved looking at the maps in this picture. When I think of maps, I usually just think about a plain old mercator projection of the world. However, this article has reminded me of how special each and every map it. Each map is made by a group of people who put in a lot of time and effort to giving the public the best information. I would have never thought of mapmaking as reaching as deep at the Atlantic ridges and reaching as high as the moon. It is simply amazing how much these mapmaker must understand of the world and even to some extent the Universe to make these maps. Maps are simply amazing. However, this does remind me of the article I read about how HarperCollins omitted Israel from the maps in the Middle East. It just shows that our perceptions of maps as objective things just are not that true. Maps do show favoritism and may leave out certain countries or territories that the group of people who made the map do not like or do not recognize.

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The 10 Canadian Provinces, And What They Would Be Like As High School Kids

The 10 Canadian Provinces, And What They Would Be Like As High School Kids | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Ontario is that loudmouthed jerk kid who nobody really likes but who they hang out with anyway because he's pretty good at sports.
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7 Simple Photography Hacks That You Should Know | 9GAG.tv

7 Simple Photography Hacks That You Should Know | 9GAG.tv | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Not applicable for Instagram photographers.
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NFL Logos Get Soccer Facelift

NFL Logos Get Soccer Facelift | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Football is loved all around the world, but the term can refer to two very different sports.
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Everything Wrong With America In One Simple Image (INFOGRAPHIC)

Everything Wrong With America In One Simple Image (INFOGRAPHIC) | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
We used to value intelligence and ingenuity. Now we worship THIS instead.
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Crest Canada (dd) T-Shirts

Crest Canada (dd) T-Shirts | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
ArtPolitic, Canada, North America, Team, League, Football, soccer, hockey, tennis, sports, world, cup, Ball, Championship, Country, Champion, flag, cool, humorous, Nation
T-Shirts.
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Evolution of Car Logos

This article should come in handy for the next time you're stuck in traffic: have you ever wondered why the Audi in front of you has a logo of four interlocked rings?
Scott Greer's insight:

Given that I live in China and there are so many manufacturers here, the history of the logos and images we recognize instantly is really interesting to me.  Whether you read it or look at the pictures, the changes are intriguing.

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24 Canadianisms way more interesting than 'eh?'

24 Canadianisms way more interesting than 'eh?' | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
Toronto is nicknamed Hogtown, and if you're ever in the mood for a mixture of tomato juice and beer, ask for a Calgary Redeye
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“We Saw Your Boobs” – Seth MacFarlane

“We Saw Your Boobs” – Seth MacFarlane | Miscellaneous Fun Stuff | Scoop.it
See Every Clip Mentioned in “We Saw Your Boobs” By Seth MacFarlane Tweet

Via Gracie Passette
Scott Greer's insight:

The show may have lacked a bit, but one way or another, this was an attention-grabber

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Laura Brown's comment, February 27, 2013 1:22 PM
They were laughing about that on the radio here. They said it was the only part of the Oscars they actually remembered. Sounded pretty stupid - at least the version the radio morning person did.