MAZAMORRA en morada
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MAZAMORRA en morada
Una colección de materiales heterogéneos que sólo tienen en común el suscitar el interés del compilador y de los lectores que presuntamente van a interesarse, mezclando opiniones, informaciones y curiosidades...
Curated by parislima
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[PERÚ: 27 años] Oldest and YOUNGEST Populations

[PERÚ: 27 años] Oldest and YOUNGEST Populations | MAZAMORRA en morada | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 2, 1:05 AM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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[ #CONGA_WW ] Could there be 'WATER WARS' in the Future?

[ #CONGA_WW ] Could there be 'WATER WARS' in the Future? | MAZAMORRA en morada | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


Via Kyle M Norton, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, October 6, 2012 4:55 AM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
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The World As 100 People: Understanding Global Statistics

The World As 100 People: Understanding Global Statistics | MAZAMORRA en morada | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 8:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 7:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 5:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Understanding Population Pyramids

This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline.

 

Simple introduction on how to analyze population pyramids.   Update: some these slides originally came from a different presentation, which has since been revised.  You can find the revisions at: http://houstonhs.scsk12.org/~mrobinson/Mr._Robinsons_Web_Site_at_Houston_High_School/June_Presentation.html (paste in full URL)


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Seth Dixon's comment, May 11, 2012 2:48 AM
http://houstonhs.scsk12.org/~mrobinson/Mr._Robinsons_Web_Site_at_Houston_High_School/June_Presentation.html
Is the URL for the revised presentation.
Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 18, 2014 4:15 PM

Unit 2 Population and Migration

This diagram is an 18 slide powerpoint explaining the uses of, how to analyze, and what a population pyramid shows. This is also in a childish language and is very easy to understand making it an easy thing to use and visualize. It shows how pyramids show fertility rates migration and workforce.

This diagram powerpoint relates to unit 2 because it shows population pyramids with population and migration data on them referencing to the units core concepts. This delves deep into the understanding of the uses of population diagrams overall and their effects on society's parts, It is overall a major part of unit 2.

Ross Mackay's curator insight, March 8, 5:28 AM
Different shapes and implications US focussed