misbehavior in the classroom
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Rescooped by Jackie Senerchia from Classroom Discipline
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5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline | misbehavior in the classroom | Scoop.it
Something I have come to know is that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline. Admittedly, there are some who believe student behaviour will take care of itself; that we'...

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 9:50 PM

Great insight! 

JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:33 AM

Tom Schimmer shares five guiding principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline in his article posted February 7, 2013.  He starts out by stating that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline.  He says increasing overall level of student engagement will reduce negative behaviors.  The principles are as follows:

1. Every school-wide discipline plan is designed to be an instrument of support and inclusion, not removal and isolation.

2. Be clear about expected behaviors and what success can/should look like.

3. Be reasonable, consistent, and air when responding to inappropriate behaviors.

4. Pre-correct for anticipated behavioral errors.

5. Respect the uniqueness of each student, each incident, and each set of circumstances.

 

I really wanted to include this article because discipline in the schools is not limited to just the classroom.  The culture of the schools sets the tone for the way students and teachers act.  I appreciate how the said schools have to be thoughtful about how they approach discipline.  As soon as discipline becomes an after thought, students will get reckless.  Principles four and five stood out the most to me.  I think good schools anticipate when bad behavior might occur, not because they think their student are bad but simply through years of experience dealing with such things.  Pre-correcting or letting the student know that this is not the expectations and spelling out the consequences is a great way to minimize bad behavior in one fell swoop.  The fifth concept of uniqueness is really important to me.  Each child is different and there is never a one size fits all discipline policy and procedure.  Circumstances and motivation are always different and each incident should be considered individually.  It's important to have the school wide discipline policies act as support and aid to the teachers’ policies in the classroom, I feel they should never be in conflict.  This was my only curated sources that dealt with school-wide discipline, but I think some of the other principles outlined in the other items curated would work on a school wide level, too.

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Set Up Rules and Routines

Set Up Rules and Routines | misbehavior in the classroom | Scoop.it
Rules and routines keep your class running smoothly so that you have more time for teaching academics. Here are some ideas for establishing, using, and reinforcing rules and routines.

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:34 PM

In order to keep your class running smoothly, you need to establish rules and routines.  This article takes the point of view that rules need to be established and enforced.  Different ways to do this that are suggested are involving the class in making the rules, keeping them short, phrase them in a positive way, post rules and go over them, and change a rule if it doesn’t work.  The other main aspect of this article is establishing routines so that you can save large amounts of time.  Routines include things such as passing papers, leaving to go to the restroom, sharpening pencils, and dismissing the class. 

 

I found that these routines are extremely helpful and really do save you time.  In my placement, I was able to experience this first hand.  My cooperating teacher at my field placement had established routines in the classroom and all she would have to do is say one word and the kids would know what to do and it really did make the classroom run a whole lot smoother.  I appreciated the suggestions for posting rules and enforcing them and I think this is good only to an extent.  While rules can outline the expectations for the classroom, they don't do any good when not enforced properly.  Kids have to buy in and grab hold to the vision of the classroom climate that following the rules will set.

nicole jennings's curator insight, March 31, 2014 5:11 PM

I believe this to be a great help in setting up expectations for the classroom at the beginning of the school year. It guidelines ways to get students involved in setting up practicle rules and routines to follow throughout the year.

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Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline

Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline | misbehavior in the classroom | Scoop.it
The petty classroom annoyances that were almost charming little obstacles to be overcome in early September now seem to be huge hurdles as discouraged teachers wonder if we will ever make the kind of profound changes in our students that we dreamed...

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:21 PM

This is a six-part article on getting tough on classroom discipline.  The articles include an introductory page, moving toward self-discipline, teaching student how to monitor themselves, questions that can encourage self-discipline, focused on student strengths, and simple activities to boost self-esteem.  This resources supports self discipline saying to teachers that when students can monitor themselves, you no longer have to assume the role of the overbearing adult in the classroom.  Some suggestions for encouraging self-discipline are paying your students compliments, make eye contact, have students share hidden talents, set goals, ask for student advice, and use your class's personality for debate and discussion.  Finally, this article offers suggestions to improve self-esteem such as taking pictures and making a wall of fame.

 

I like that this resource on discipline talks more about how to create a positive classroom atmosphere and improve students' self esteem rather than strategies for how to come down on them.  I love the suggestions for discussions to have with your students to involve them in creating the environment of the classroom and I liked the suggestions for things I can actually do as positive behavior intervention strategies.  I feel like this resource connects to Alfie Kohn's ideas because it also says the best way to discipline kids is to let them do the disciplining and ask them guiding questions so they can come to the solution on their own.

liam bye's curator insight, October 2, 2015 11:22 PM

This article stretches over a number of different factors that can contribute to effective classroom management. Such as positive reinforcement, boosting self esteem, reflective strategies and student centred discipline.   

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Class Tech Tips: Picture Perfect Behavior

Class Tech Tips: Picture Perfect Behavior | misbehavior in the classroom | Scoop.it
There are lots of ways to create a classroom culture that rewards positive behavior. I love using the camera on my iPad to record "Picture Perfect" behavior. When I'm ready to start a lesson I want...

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Rescooped by Jackie Senerchia from Classroom Discipline
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Positive Classroom Discipline - Chapter 18, Discipline Management as an Integrated System

Discipline, Tools for Teaching, positive discipline, classroom management, staff development, professional development, new teacher training, Title One, new teacher induction, teacher training, effective teaching, teacher workshops, no child left ...

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"Disruptive students are one of the major complaints of classroom teachers."

"Disruptive students are one of the major complaints of classroom teachers." | misbehavior in the classroom | Scoop.it

By Walt Gardner

 

Practices that try to repair the harm caused by student misbehavior are more promising than punishment.


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