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Anti-Coal Lobby Overlooks Many Benefits of Surface Mining

Anti-Coal Lobby Overlooks Many Benefits of Surface Mining | Mining | Scoop.it
Coal companies are required to restore the landscape after mining projects and have a positive impact on the surrounding ecosystems.
allee kowzan's insight:

this is a very interesting article. It talks about how citizens are against coal mining and destroying mountains. People even shaved their head and said "hair grows back, but mountains wont.". I agree that they need to put a limit on coal mining. We don't want to loose all of our mountains they are one of the United States most treasured natural features. 

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mining map2.jpg (960x720 pixels)

mining map2.jpg (960x720 pixels) | Mining | Scoop.it
allee kowzan's insight:

This is a map of mining in the U.S and what kind of mining happens in different parts of the United States. This is important to understand where resources and industry and most are mining and farming. I really like this map, it is very clear and easy to read and learn from. 

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Rescooped by allee kowzan from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Coal Extraction Poses Climate Challenge for Obama Administration ...

Coal Extraction Poses Climate Challenge for Obama Administration ... | Mining | Scoop.it

When it comes to coal mining in the United States, environmentalists have a simple goal: End it!

 

For the Obama administration, it’s a little more complicated.

 

Since taking office nearly three years ago, the administration has restricted coal-mining waste from being dumped into streams and imposed new pollution controls on coal-fired power plants. But on the fundamental question of whether the government should halt federal leasing, the administration’s answer has been: not yet.

 

Instead, the federal government is analzying the environmental impact of extracting coal from public land, drawing fire from both sides. Environmentalists say such action doesn’t go far enough, while industry officials question why it would pursue this analysis in the absence of a federal law on greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
allee kowzan's insight:

I agree that it was a good idea for Obama to restrict coal-mining waste from being dumped into streams and imposed new pollution controls on coal-fired power plants. I think this is good becasue everyone wanted to end it. Also it causes pollution. It is important that we stop this. Im glad that Obama did this, we can't keep polluting the earth and water.

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Rescooped by allee kowzan from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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On Schedule: Canada Turning Fresh Water Lakes into Mine Tailing Dumps - Pacific Free Press | Pacific Free Press

On Schedule: Canada Turning Fresh Water Lakes into Mine Tailing Dumps - Pacific Free Press | Pacific Free Press | Mining | Scoop.it

In 2010, the Council of Canadians joined with the Sandy Pond Alliance for the Protection of Canadian Waters to launch a Federal Court challenge against the federal Schedule 2 provision that allows mining companies to dump their tailings waste into freshwater lakes. The challenge was intended to save both Sandy Pond in Newfoundland and other lakes threatened by Schedule 2 across the country, including Fish Lake in British Columbia. Mining companies have applied to use about 13 natural water bodies as waste sites, with 5 water bodies already approved for destruction.

The Brazilian mining corporation Vale and the Mining Association of Canada made efforts to delay the Federal Court hearing so much so that the case was only heard this past week by Justice Elizabeth Heneghan. 


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
allee kowzan's insight:

I do not agree with what they are doing explained in the article. I don't think it is okay that  in canada a fresh water lake was turned into a mining site. We can't keep getting rid of FRESH water lakes. Also I don't know if we keep doing this what will happen in the future. It is scary to think about, I just dont agree with this article. It is important that we put some sort of stop to this so it doest rapidly continue.

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yongyee yang's comment, October 3, 2013 9:11 AM
I think that they should've left the fresh water lakes because right now I think that the world should start worrying about water. RIght now waters are being polluted and so its harder to get fresh water that you can drink of. I agree with the protection of Canadian waters.
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Mining induced earthquakes is damaging many locations in the world - Focus on ... - Earthquake Report

Mining induced earthquakes is damaging many locations in the world - Focus on ... - Earthquake Report | Mining | Scoop.it
Mining induced earthquakes is damaging many locations in the world - Focus on ...
Earthquake Report
Over and over again ER is noticing that small to moderate earthquakes occur in regions with intense underground mining activities.
allee kowzan's insight:

This is a very interesting article about not only the USA but also other countries about how earthquakes occur in regions with intense underground mining activites. This is not only dangerous but it is happening over and over and earthquakes do a lot of damage which cost a lot of money to repair. This is very important becuase earthquakes are very serious and we don't want them occuring often.

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Rescooped by allee kowzan from The NewSpace Daily
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The Asteroid Mining Company – NASA wants to bag an asteroid! | Planetary Resources

The Asteroid Mining Company  – NASA wants to bag an asteroid! | Planetary Resources | Mining | Scoop.it

Word is leaking out about NASA’s plans to catch an asteroid with a robotic spacecraft and tow it back toward Earth, where it would then be placed in a stable orbit around the Moon.  There it can be a nearby destination for NASA’s human exploration program, and serve as an initial facility to help the development of asteroid mining technology.

 

As U.S. Senator Bill Nelson noted “The plan combines the science of mining an asteroid, along with developing ways to deflect one, along with providing a place to develop ways we can go to Mars.”

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
allee kowzan's insight:

This is such a cool and fasinating article. They talk about NASA’s plans to catch an asteroid with a robotic spacecraft and tow it back toward Earth. This is pretty important  to the United States im guessing since NASA is the biggest space agency in the U.S.. I really enjoyed this article. I am so for mining in space. I never knew you could!

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Samantha Hedrick's comment, October 2, 2013 11:34 AM
This is very interesting! I didn't even know it was possible that you could do mining in space. I thought that they just did that here on Earth.
Rescooped by allee kowzan from NWT News
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Canada's North digs in for the good & bad of a mining boom

Canada's North digs in for the good & bad of a mining boom | Mining | Scoop.it
Agnico-Eagle's Meadowbank gold mine is pictured near Baker Lake, Nunavut, where an economic boom is taking hold.

Photograph by: Chris Wattie , Reuters

[excerpt]

You can see the effects of the mining boom in Canada's North on the streets of its communities: There's commotion; there's optimism; and there's money.

Boris Kotelewetz says he's witnessed first-hand the changes growth in the mining sector across the three territories have brought to his community of Baker Lake, Nunavut. While he admits there's a wave of economic prosperity sweeping through the region, he also warns of the dangers of short-sightedness, both in the industry and in the towns it leaves behind.

"I've seen all kinds of changes," said Kotelewetz, who has lived in Baker Lake for 46 years.

"To me, it's like when the whalers came and they needed fresh meat; they employed local people to take part in that. Then that industry died out. Then the Hudson's Bay Co., came and they employed people in trapping and that industry kind of died out.

"Now we have mining coming along. Because it's a non-renewable resource, it's not everlasting. It's just going to die out — certainly the gold mine will — and that will just be the end to another thing that started and stopped."

Kotelewetz operates a lodge and other businesses in Baker Lake, a community of 1,800 located about 70 kilometres south of Meadowbank, a gold deposit being mined by Agnico-Eagle Mines Ltd., a Canadian-based gold producer with operations in Canada, Finland and Mexico.

The mine has significantly increased employment in Baker Lake, and with that comes a boost in morale associated with an influx of jobs and an increase in disposable income.

Kotelewetz, however, says he worries that a lack of preparation for the future may create problems down the road.

"It's a party right now," he said. "We're having a party here, but we have to think about when that party ends. What happens then?"

The situation in Baker Lake is hardly unique.

[...]

Back in Baker Lake, Kotelewetz said he hopes residents can realize the dangers of living only for the present, but given the history of many mining operations across the country, he isn't holding out much hope.

"They might wake up when they're faced with the problem and say 'Oh, we should have done this and we should have done that,'" he said. "Maybe the next mine that comes along, they might treat it differently, but not with this one.

"The longer it goes, the more comfortable people will become and the less they will think of tomorrow. That's going to be the farthest thing from their mind. It's like any mining town in Canada."

 

 


Via Northern_Clips
allee kowzan's insight:

I think that it would be hard living in a mining town in Canada. Like they said in the article it would be hard not nowing what the next day holds because mining is a non-renewable resource and its not everlasting. It is important that there are people mining out there for everyone else though. I agree with one of the citizens from this mining town that there is a start to it and there will be a stop, and that is some what nerve racking.

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World's two biggest mining companies want to mine sacred lands and a public campground - STOP IT @BarackObama

World's two biggest mining companies want to mine sacred lands and a public campground - STOP IT @BarackObama | Mining | Scoop.it

United States | Arizona | Superior : Rio Tinto/BHPBilliton

Moonrise over Apache Leap. Credit: Arizona Mining Reform Coalition

World's two biggest mining companies want to mine sacred lands and a public campground

 

A subsidiary of Rio Tinto and BHPBilliton (the two biggest metal mining companies in the world, by annual revenue and market capitalization) is proposing to mine a rich copper vein on public and private lands east of Superior, Arizona.

Because the copper lies partially under a public campground that has been withdrawn from mining, the company, called Resolution Copper, hopes to pass a land exchange bill in Congress to obtain title to the campground.

A place worth protecting

The proposed mining area is not only prized by birders, campers, climbers and hikers, the tribes in the area consider it sacred. The San Carlos Apache tribe is actively opposed to the land exchange and potential mine because of the destructive impacts it would have on the surrounding ecosystem and traditional use lands.

- See more at: http://www.earthworksaction.org/voices/detail/oak_flat_apache_leap#.UjcF4Makq19


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
allee kowzan's insight:

I think that this article is actually very important because this happened in the United State and it was the worlds two biggest mining companies that wanted to mine in sacred lands. I disagree with the intentions that they had. I think that it isn't necessarily the right thing to do. I think this because the campgrounds and parks they want to mine in are used for religious and recreational purposes. But I think it is okay that they mine in the canyons because that is the other place they want to mine. I don't think its the right thing to do to mine in sacred lands.

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Aletta Verhey's comment, September 27, 2013 1:29 PM
I agree with this article because I don't think it's right for them to destruct or even mess with religious lands. Even if they aren't religious to the people who want to mine it, but it means something to the people who live there or practice that certain religion.
Allie Moore's comment, October 1, 2013 9:44 PM
I agree with this article because I don't think they should be allowed to mine in religious or private areas. I agree that they should mine in the canyons or campgrounds.
Mariah Kooyman's comment, October 2, 2013 9:11 PM
I agree completely because it should be required by law that people are not allowed to mine on or anywhere near private properties. It is very disrepspectful to the land owners/managers and the mining company should get fined or something should happen because its just not right. If they need to mine it should be some place vastly far away from where anyone lives or a public place so it does not disrupt anyone.