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Mindset in the Classroom
Applying Carol Dweck's research to classrooms and schools
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Babies whose efforts are praised become more motivated kids, say Stanford researchers

Babies whose efforts are praised become more motivated kids, say Stanford researchers | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Psychologists find that praising toddlers' effort, not talent, leads to greater motivation and more positive attitudes toward challenges five years later.
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Intelligence and Other Stereotypes: The Power of Mindset | Literally Psyched, Scientific American Blog Network

Intelligence and Other Stereotypes: The Power of Mindset | Literally Psyched, Scientific American Blog Network | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Walter Mischel was nine years old when he started kindergarten. It wasn’t that his parents had been negligent in his schooling. It was just that the ...
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What Mindsets Drive Teacher Effectiveness?

What Mindsets Drive Teacher Effectiveness? | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

"This view of high-quality teaching requires evaluators to look beyond classroom performance to see the manifestations of effort focused around these five qualities. Like gravitational or electromagnetic fields, these states of mind cannot be observed directly; they are known from their effects. The ball falls from our hand; we label gravity as a cause. Likewise, we label invisible causes in classrooms. We celebrate teacher efficacy when the teacher inspires her students to grow and learn as a result of their hard work together. The invisible force is a growth mind-set. We contrast this with another less effective teacher who complains that the students are not well prepared because the teacher the year before did not prepare them. Although she may not say it directly to the students, it is highly likely the students will sense the frustration. This fixed mind-set blames external forces and limits the teacher's efficacy and ability to interact in proactive ways with children. (Dweck, 2006)."

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:08 AM

We hear these types of excuses or the blame-game all the time.  Please consider how these thoughts drive teacher behavior and their student's learning outcomes. 

Lidia Davila's curator insight, February 6, 5:20 PM

Being an effective teacher is not something that comes naturally. It takes a lot of hard work and a mind that is set on success. This article provides the 5 "states of mind" that push teachers to become more effective.

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Excellent clip of students responding to Carol Dweck’s “Mindsets” | California Acceleration Project

Excellent clip of students responding to Carol Dweck’s “Mindsets” | California Acceleration Project | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

"Across the state, faculty participating in CAP’s Community of Practice are sharing a simple but powerful classroom activity: they ask students to read a short article by researcher Carol Dweck (NAIS – Brainology) and to connect the article to their own experience. In this short video, students from four California community colleges discuss the insights this caused them to have about their own learning."

 
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Carol Dweck | newfrontierslifecoaching ... Want to succeed? Let yourself fail.

Want to Succeed? Let Yourself Fail

"We’ve all heard the catch phrases attributed to people we envy for being the most successful:  “failure is not an option”;  “Never settle for anything less than perfect”.  We tend to think of our heroes as magically ascending the ladder of success without any setbacks along the way, but is this really true?  According to what I’ve read this week, no."

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Flummoxed by Failure—or Focused? - Wall Street Journal

Flummoxed by Failure—or Focused? - Wall Street Journal | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Wall Street JournalFlummoxed by Failure—or Focused?Wall Street JournalIn a 1978 study, the Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck and a colleague gave a series of puzzles to children, all of them about 10 years old.
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Importance of failure: why Olympians and A-level students all need to fail - The Guardian (blog)

Importance of failure: why Olympians and A-level students all need to fail - The Guardian (blog) | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)Importance of failure: why Olympians and A-level students all need to failThe Guardian (blog)Abilities are therefore flexible rather than fixed.
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Carol Dweck | Pi Crust

Carol Dweck | Pi Crust | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

Post about Carol Dweck written by Allison Krasnow...

"Something new I have wanted to integrate into my classroom culture for several years is mindset coaching as developed by Carol Dweck.  The diagram below is a good summary of her work comparing students who have a fixed mindset to those who have a growth mindset.  The question is how can a teacher influence a student to change their mindset to a more growth oriented one?"

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Raising Readers and Writers ~ fixed versus dynamic mindsets ~ nice post by @Jreaderwriter

Raising Readers and Writers ~ fixed versus dynamic mindsets ~ nice post by @Jreaderwriter | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

Julie Johnson writes: "It breaks my heart at the beginning of the school year when I hear students say, “I am not good at math.” or “I am a bad reader.”  Just as bad is watching students sit in front of a blank sheet of paper, eyes brimming with fear (or sometime tears) telling me that they don’t have anything to write about and they are defeated before they even start.  I know that I have my work cut out for me, but it’s a challenge I relish.  I know that what I say and how I say it makes all the difference in the world.  I know that my first goal with these students is to help them see that yes, those things might be hard right now, but we are going to work together and we are going to learn strategies that will help us tackle problems and make progress.  My goal is for my students to see themselves as people who are ever changing, can reflect and learn from their mistakes, and can move forward no matter what."

 
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Even Geniuses Work Hard

Even Geniuses Work Hard | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

"We can all agree that meaningful schoolwork promotes students' learning of academic content. But why stop there? I believe that meaningful work can also teach students to love challenges, to enjoy effort, to be resilient, and to value their own improvement. In other words, we can design and present learning tasks in a way that helps students develop a growth mindset, which leads to not just short-term achievement but also long-term success."

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New study yields instructive results on how mindset affects learning

"When psychology Professor Carol Dweck was a sixth-grader at P.S. 153 in Brooklyn, N.Y., she experienced something that made her want to understand why some people view intelligence as a fixed trait while others embrace it as a quality that can be developed and expanded.

Dweck's teacher that year, Mrs. Wilson, seated her students around the room according to their IQ. The girls and boys who didn't have the highest IQ in the class were not allowed to carry the flag during assembly or even wash the blackboard, Dweck said. "She let it be known that IQ for her was the ultimate measure of your intelligence and your character," she said. "So the students who had the best seats were always scared of taking another test and not being at the top anymore."

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Exploring education: “The more I practice the luckier I get.” Mindset and Carol Dweck

Exploring education: “The more I practice the luckier I get.” Mindset and Carol Dweck | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

Psychologist Carol Dweck has given the educational community one of the most positive educational concepts yet to be developed – mindset. Like many good ideas it is deceptively simple – but the implications for schools are profound. Quite simply, mindset is the belief that ability is not fixed – that people can acquire new skills through targeted effort and practice. Simple.

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Harvard Education Letter -- Do "Consoling" Messages Hinder Math Achievement?

Harvard Education Letter -- Do "Consoling" Messages Hinder Math Achievement? | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

As a high school administrator, I worked closely with math teachers to figure out how to ensure that all students mastered algebra by ninth grade and successfully completed geometry and advanced algebra (or higher) prior to graduation. Confronted by many students who loudly announced that they just weren’t good at math, we made many structural, curricular, and instructional changes in our algebra program. But too many students continued to fail, often declaring their entity beliefs that math intelligence was fixed and that they just didn’t get it. We made more progress when we also addressed the social and psychological factors by explicitly teaching them that intelligence is malleable and that you can “get smarter” by working harder.

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Creating a Growth Mindset in Your Students

Creating a Growth Mindset in Your Students | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Belief that you can become smarter and more talented opens the doorways to success. That’s what twenty years of research has shown Carol Dweck of Stanford University.
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Emphasizing effort to empower learning

Emphasizing effort to empower learning | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

"My wrist one-liner is a good mantra for our schools: Give the effort. Perhaps we should have it inscribed on student desks or chiseled into classroom walls. Why? Because more than anything else, effort influences learning, and authentic learning involves effort. (In fact, students who rarely struggle are probably learning little!)

Several studies suggest a strong correlation between effort (or perseverance or grit or willpower) and achievement — not just academic success but improved life quality beyond graduation day. If this aspect of “character” is so vital, how can we give it more intentional emphasis in education?..."

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To Become an Expert: Learn to Fail to Learn | Business 2 Community

To Become an Expert: Learn to Fail to Learn | Business 2 Community | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
I’ve just begun reading Jonah Lehrer’s How We Decide, which examines what’s happening in our heads when we’re making decisions and the role dopamine...
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Educational Thinkers’ Hall of Fame – Carol Dweck and motivation theory

Educational Thinkers’ Hall of Fame – Carol Dweck and motivation theory | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Here’s another reflection about a thinker whose work influences teaching, learning and assessment in adult education. This time it’s Carol Dweck’s work on the theory of motivation...
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Carol Dweck | Gift-Ed Connections

"If you are looking for one thing that could make a difference for your gifted child/student this year, you might want to take a look at Carol Dweck’s book Mindset. Carol Dweck is a psychologist at Stanford University and her work has been hailed as one of the greatest breakthroughs in how we think about learning. In a nutshell, she explores two mindsets: the fixed mindset and the growth mindset. On her website she asks us to “Think about your intelligence, talents and personality. Are they just fixed or can you develop them?” How you respond to that question can make all the difference."

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The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potential - The Independent

The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potential - The Independent | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
The talent myth: How to maximise your creative potentialThe IndependentOne theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by...
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Opinion: You work so hard, child ~ For success, better to praise a child's work ethic, not her smarts.

I'm listening to my 5-year-old read. She's working her way through Syd Hoff's Sammy the Seal. Although she struggles with the word "know," she gets halfway through the book before deciding it's time for a break.

I am thrilled with her reading, delighted with her teacher and see this as empirical evidence of my child's genius. The words "You are so smart" are forming. And then I stop. I don't say them. I am thinking, instead, of the discussion happening around the country about praise and its effects on children.

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Raising Successful Children

Raising Successful Children | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Unnecessary intervention makes your child feel bad about himself (if he’s young) or angry at you (if he’s a teenager.)...
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Carol Dweck | About Teaching ~ excellent blog post by @corisel

Carol Dweck | About Teaching ~ excellent blog post by @corisel | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

In this blog post,  Corinne Campbell writes:

 

"How can we ensure our students remain learners?

It comes down to what [Carol Dweck] calls ‘mindsets’.

There are two: Fixed and Growth.

People with a fixed mindset believe that intelligence is finite. We are born with a finite quantity of intelligence (or ability in any field – sport, music etc) and that’s it. That’s your quota for life. You either have it or you don’t.

People with a growth mindset believe that intelligence, and all abilities, can be developed over time.

Those with a fixed mindset usually become non-learners whereas those with a growth mindset become lifelong learners."

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Warning Signs of an Unhealthy Appetite for Risk -- Fixed Mindset

Warning Signs of an Unhealthy Appetite for Risk -- Fixed Mindset | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it
How is it that so many corporate stars — leaders at Enron, WorldCom, and the major banking institutions, for instance — are so inclined to take outrageous risks that they bring their companies, even entire economies, to the brink of disaster?
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My Father's Day wish: Curious children - CNN.com

My Father's Day wish: Curious children - CNN.com | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

Here's what I want for Father's Day: I want my children to develop a passion for science. I've decided to grease the wheels. I've called the best for advice...

 

Dweck suggests we find ways to communicate to our children that "we value doing hard things, persisting, focusing -- without preaching, of course. ... Even sitting around the dinner table and asking, 'Who had a great struggle today? What are you going to struggle with tomorrow?' "
The more you listen to Dweck's insights about the growth mindset -- the more you realize how much it has in common with the spirit of science. It's about taking the risk to explore. To discover. To fail. To get back up when you're knocked down and explore some more.

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The Trouble With Bright Girls | Psychology Today

The Trouble With Bright Girls | Psychology Today | Mindset in the Classroom | Scoop.it

Chances are good that if you are a successful professional today, you were a pretty bright fifth grade girl. My graduate advisor, psychologist Carol Dweck (author of Mindset) conducted a series of studies in the 1980s, looking at how bright girls and boys in the fifth grade handled new, difficult and confusing material.

 

She found that bright girls, when given something to learn that was particularly foreign or complex, were quick to give up - and the higher the girls' IQ, the more likely they were to throw in the towel...

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