Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader
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Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader
Mindfulness is being present to oneself. Leading oneself is the Odyssey. Mindful Leadership is about: Being, Thinking, Doing & Not Doing.
Curated by ozziegontang
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Uncovering The Blind Spot of Leadership, by C. Otto Scharmer

Uncovering The Blind Spot of Leadership, by C. Otto Scharmer | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Why do many of our attempts to address the challenges of our times fail? This article presents the view that two leaders in the same environment acting in the same way can bring about completely different outcomes depending on the inner place from which each operates. We know very little about this inner dimension and this lack of knowledge constitutes a blind spot in our approach to leadership and management. This article sheds light on the inner dimension of leadership and presents seven leadership capacities to develop in order to become a more effective leader. Profound change today not only requires a shift of the mind, it requires a shift of the will and a shift of the heart.

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

Psychologist Dorothy Mitchell shared a small bright yellow card that resides on hundreds and hundreds of bathroom and bedroom mirrors around the world stating: You are looking at the face of the person who is responsible for your happiness.  For Lee Thayer: If it's to be it's up to me.  The first person to lead is myself.

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Annette Schmeling's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:01 AM

Otto Scharmer provides a strategy to to be free of personal preferences, superfluous attachments, and preformed opinions. Effective leaders, argues Scharmer, have the interior disposition and interior freedom necessary to access intention and see the emerging whole. 

P.S. Scharmer would have made a great Jesuit!

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Have You Mastered This Key to Great Leadership?

Have You Mastered This Key to Great Leadership? | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Leaders bring out the best in others, but the most successful leaders go even farther: They form lasting emotional bonds. They are the kind of leaders we hold in our hearts. Deep motivation then
ozziegontang's insight:

When coming from the heart remember to bring your brain and your competence (being better tomorrow than I was today) along.


Another sharing from Mark Taylor's Leadership Best Practices Because Culture Matters.





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What Truly Successful People Know That You Don't

What Truly Successful People Know That You Don't | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Six research-based strategies to help you overcome barriers to success
ozziegontang's insight:

Melanie's article is a good reminder of things that many of us forget or neglect

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ozziegontang's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:28 PM

Mens sana in corpore sano.  You don't have a vision, the vision has you.  Be accountable. People choose problems they can't solve rather than choices or decisions they do not want to make. Reading the work of Lee Thayer brings much of this into focus especially his first book: Leadership: Thinking Being Doing.  How I think influences who I am, who I am influences what I do. What I do create my habits. And in the end, as in the beginning, my habits create me.  Get right the thinking and the practice of life-long learning and being more competent each day and I may have a chance to "Take a message to Garcia."

John Michel's curator insight, December 2, 2013 7:48 PM

Six tips to work smarter, not harder.

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Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness

Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
In my first rock-climbing lesson, I got stuck. I could see a ledge next to my right knee, but nothing for my hands to hold. I cried for help. My instructor directed me to the ledge.“Thanks for

Via Mark Taylor, ozziegontang
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Mark Taylor's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:58 AM

This is beautiful. Every leader should read it. Fred is talking about what we call in Tribal Leadership, core values. Most of us don't choose power, wealth, youth, beauty, pleasure, or fame, These are outcomes; qualities such as love, justice, discipline, vision, kindness, compassion, commitment, and courage are choices. The first ones depend on external circumstances; the second ones depend on you. We can design our lives to be the people we want  and to make the difference in the world.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Dave Logan, co-author of Tribal Leadership, speaks of crucible moments when very difficult circumstances call forth our greatness and, in many ways, our true selves.  Great leaders have these crucible moments (indeed we all do) and the author of this article identifies several of them while also presenting questions for you to answer as you seek out your special gifts, your greatness.  It is from this knowledge and utilization of our special gifts, when woven together with those of our colleagues, that great work cultures evolve.

ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:35 PM

The quote of John Wooden says it: 


“True success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.”



Lee Thayer in his thought provoking and thought challenging book: Leadership: Thinking Being Doing shared:


"In all the world, there is no human e xperience that can compare to the exercise of the deeply-developed competencies required for the pursuit of a great and worthy achievement"


In the final paragraphs of the book he adds:


if you succeed, be humble. Others comspired with you to make it happen. You were blessed.


If you did not succeed, go backa nd fix the only things over which you have control: how you think, who you are, and how you do what you do. And make all of the tools required an integral part of who you are.

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MIT--The 2 Most Underrated Leadership Skills includes storytelling

MIT--The 2 Most Underrated Leadership Skills includes storytelling | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
VideoLeadership is changing. A big part is the impact of the Millennials. They are less apt to respond to command & control and respond much more positively to a different kind of leadership. Even a recession has not cured them of this.

Via Karen Dietz
ozziegontang's insight:

Read Karen's Insight.  Relating to Leadership and reflecting on Lee Thayer's 4+ decades focused on Leadership and High Performance, leaders don't have a Vision, the Vision has them. And the story they share allows others to choose to be part of that Vision.


As Karen shares: "It's the stories you as a leader share, and the stories told about a leader, that defines that signature. As the article says, it's a leader's values, experiences, and skills that make up that signature. Again, I'm saying that happens through the stories that are shared."

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 18, 2013 7:25 PM

I found this article really interesting because it is not your ordinary run-of-the mill article about leadership. Recent MIT studies have identified 2 essential leadership skills that are completely under the radar.


The first critical leadership skill is sense-making. The way they talk about this in the article is being able to make sense of the environment and its rapid changes, then being able to operate from that sense-making. This leads me to think how important storytelling is in that process -- listening for stories, being able to make sense from them, extrapolate meaning from that, and then sharing stories with that meaning to bring others on board.


The second critical leadership skill the study identified is innovation. No surprises there and that does not really connect to storytelling. But what does connect is the section of the article talking about a leader's leadership signature -- their unique way of leading. Now storytelling comes front and center again. It's the stories you as a leader share, and the stories told about a leader, that defines that signature. As the article says, it's a leader's values, experiences, and skills that make up that signature. Again, I'm saying that happens through the stories that are shared.


So this is a provocative read. And it won't take you long. Think about the insights here whether you are a leader in an enterprise, a manager, entrerpreneur, or small business firm.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Karen Dietz's comment, June 24, 2013 2:57 PM
Thank you Ozzie and I appreciate your sharing this piece :)
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The Servant Leadership example of Bill & Melinda Gates

The Servant Leadership example of Bill & Melinda Gates | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it

Servant Leadership The largest financial example of Servant Leadership to change the world is being led by Bill and Melinda Gates via their Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

ozziegontang's insight:

These words shared by Bill Gates at the 2007 Harvard Commencement say it well:


"We can make market forces work better for the poor if we can develop a more creative capitalism – if we can stretch the reach of market forces so that more people can make a profit, or at least make a living, serving people who are suffering from the worst inequities. We also can press governments around the world to spend taxpayer money in ways that better reflect the values of the people who pay the taxes."


"If we can find approaches that meet the needs of the poor in ways that generate profits for business and votes for politicians, we will have found a sustainable way to reduce inequity in the world. This task is open-ended. It can never be finished. But a conscious effort to answer this challenge will change the world.”

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The Community of Leaders » Trustworthy Leadership

The Community of Leaders » Trustworthy Leadership | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it

One of the business issues gaining in importance is the trust – or lack of trust – that we have in our large corporations.

ozziegontang's insight:

In Vistage, the foundation of its Values, at the base of a triagle is: Trust. Up one side is Caring, up the other side is Challenge, and in the middle is growth.


Dan Ariely speak about the Cost of the Social Norm which is based on Trust and Social Relationships. The Market Norm is based on Financial Transactions.  When the Social Norm is replaced by the Market Norm he says it is extremely difficult if not impossible to regain the trust.


Trust cannot be bought, it must be earned.


If you lose my trust by your behavior, then I can trust that I cannot trust you.


Lee Thayer speaks of Leadership is a role that one plays. If one plays it well and is had by a vision that may outlast them, then history recognizes them as leaders. Those who we recognize as historical leaders did not have access to the 10,000 books that we have today on Leaderhship, yet what they accomplished was because of their competence at doing what needed to be done to accomplish their leadership role.


As Simon Sinek reminds us:  They had followers.





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Meditating Your Way To More Effective Leadership

Meditating Your Way To More Effective Leadership | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it

 

The Drucker School of Management and Wharton Business School both offer courses in mindfulness meditation. Virginia Tech is sponsoring "contemplative practices for a technological society," a conference for engineers who integrate contemplative disciplines into their work. Google offers courses in meditation and yoga

 

Aetna, Merck, General Mills--the list goes on--all are exploring how meditation can help their leaders and employees agilely thrive in today's fast-paced business environment. And the benefits are widely publicized: sustained attention span, improved multi-tasking abilities, strengthened immune system, increased emotional intelligence, improved listening skills...And there is science behind such claims.


Via Pamir Kiciman, The BioSync Team, Annette Schmeling
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Jem Muldoon's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:15 PM

When top business schools highlight the importance of mindfulness with courses for future leaders, we now have precedence for including it in educational leadership training.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 15, 2013 7:01 PM

I like the ideas that mindfulness is combined with Peter Drucker's work and that large companies are looking at meditation as something that will benefit employees.

Lauran Star's curator insight, March 19, 2013 11:43 AM

What really happens when we meditate? How can such a simple act of sitting still actually cultivate agile, talented leaders? Read this article to learn more.

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11 Quotes from Sir Richard Branson on Business, Leadership, and Passion - Forbes

11 Quotes from Sir Richard Branson on Business, Leadership, and Passion - Forbes | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Richard Barnson shares his common sense secrets of success.
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Yes, You Can Learn to Sell -- moving people with biz storytelling

Yes, You Can Learn to Sell -- moving people with biz storytelling | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
The skills of a great influencer are learned, not innate.

Via Karen Dietz
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ozziegontang's comment, February 21, 2013 5:18 PM
To alter a perception. An explanation masquerading as fact.
Karen Dietz's comment, February 21, 2013 8:01 PM
Fabulous comments Ozzie! The one about 'telling I can't sell' and being 'sold' on that made me smile :)
Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2013 7:25 AM

Debe ser cierto que hay personas "nacidas para vender", pero cualquiera puede ser un vendedor eficaz; nadie es "malo" de por sí en ningún area, todo se puede aprender, a lo mejor no se llega a ser un fuera de serie, pero la capacidad de aprendizaje siempre está ahí.

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#1 Barrier to Leadership – Not Listening

#1 Barrier to Leadership – Not Listening | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
I introduced a series of the Top 10 Barriers to Leadership skills and leadership qualities. I have given a lot of thought to prioritize the top 10.

Via Annette Schmeling
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Annette Schmeling's curator insight, January 23, 2013 12:27 PM

Never lose sight of the fact that inside every person is a real person who has the same fundamental needs to be loved and belong as anyone else. Make the person "feel felt" and you too will be transformed into a friend/ally.

ozziegontang's curator insight, October 13, 2013 2:26 AM

Hidden in the word "Listen" is the word "Silent." Most of us are most often speaking or getting ready to speak, thus missing much of what the other person said.

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Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle

Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
The first master of the art believed in ethos, pathos, and logos.

Via Karen Dietz
ozziegontang's insight:

This is what I shared:

 

Enjoyed reading your article. 

 

Wanted to share a quote from my mentor,  Lee Thayer.  In the opening chapter of his book “Communication!: A Radically new Approach to Life’s Most Perplexing Problem” he shared:-----

 

 “…what “communicates” is the interpretation that someone makes of a happening, a situation, an image, or an utterance. A person may be listening to you. But what that person is hearing is not what you said, but her own interpretation of what you may (or may not) have said. All of the actual consequences of any communication encounter flow from the interpretations that people make of things. That may or may not be what was intended. But the power player in any communication situation is the “receiver,” not the “sender.”-----

 

“…Never mistake your interpretation for reality. Just know that you have to live with the consequences of how you, and others, interpret things.   What “communicates’” is whatever a person pays attention to and however she interprets it. You do not control her interpretations, nor does she control yours. That’s how the process works. If you have a different conception of the process, you may want to consider this one. It has far fewer bumps in the road, fewer problems.”-----

 

 

The 9 or 10 books Lee’s written in the past  5 or 6 years contain the seminal ideas he’s been sharing on Communication, Leadership and  high performance organizations for the past 45 years.  And most people have never heard of him.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 18, 2013 1:19 PM

Aristotle and his criteria for effective storytelling still rock after all these years!


This article is a great re-cap of ethos, pathos, and logos. Miss any one of these and you are toast.


The author Scott Edinger's explainations of these are very clear and concise. Pay attention to these 3 elements and for sure you will be a better communicator and storyteller.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Karen Dietz's comment, January 21, 2013 1:08 PM
Wonderful comments Ozzie and I agree completely. When I teach MBA students in business communication the entire class is an experience of this. We are always in a state of conveying and refining meaning and living with the interpretations of others. We can experience alignment in meaning, but it takes work. It can be especially difficult when interpretations remain different despite all our efforts. In the end, I think effective communication is the best self-development tool we have around!
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TEC Florida: Stories are an important part of Red Scott’s Leadership

TEC Florida: Stories are an important part of Red Scott’s Leadership | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it

 

Stories were a very important part of my leadership style at the many companies which I was either the Chairman, The President or the CEO.

I tried to give each manager or executive who reports directly to me:

1) a copy of “The Go Getter” booklet by Peter Kyne

2) a copy of the Abilene Paradox by Jerry Harvey

Check out the Abilene DVD at CRM Learning
They have a collection of top training videos.

3) a copy of my speech on the 8 Success Traits

 

As a result – a part of our short hand language or style became such comments:

Is he/she lucky?Is he/she a Go Getter?Are we about to take a trip to Abilene?Is it clear to you that this project is a “blue vaser?”

Hope this helps. Best regards. Red

 

ozziegontang's insight:

Red Scott has been an inspiration to thousands of individuals.  His insights and wisdom delivered in a folksy and humorous way through his many stories have taught lessons that need to be taught. 

 

I am pleased to be among those whose livws he has touched.

 

His life is and has been about being a Blue-Vaser.

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Karen Dietz's comment, December 22, 2012 2:38 PM
Love this Ozzie! Thanks for finding and sharing this article. Happy holidays!
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Miami Dolphins: Leadership, Organizational Culture and Empty Words

Miami Dolphins: Leadership, Organizational Culture and Empty Words | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Recently, I wrote about the issue of leadership, accountability and the case of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. I argued that leaders are responsible for creating organizational cultures; and, regardless of whether Chris Christie, Jamie Dimon or Barack Obama are knowledgeable about the things going on under their watches, each [...]

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

There is a world of difference between what I say and what I do. Am I talking about it or...Doing it.  A reminder that practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent.  So I need to be careful as to what my practice is.   ozzie Mindfulness.com

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 26, 2014 7:38 PM

So true! Actions speak louder than words.

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Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy?

Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy? | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Many leaders inadvertently stand in the way of superior performance. Here’s how to avoid the hindrance trap.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 8, 2014 9:10 PM

As Pogo said, we have met the enemy and the enemy is us.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:53 AM

Leadership is largely about developing your people, setting a vision, and supporting them in making it happen.  But are you hindering that success by not setting clear expectations, not considering organizational capacity when rolling out a new initiative, or setting policies and procedures that aren't useful?  Leaders clear the way, they don't stand in the way.

ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 2014 5:23 PM

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success

Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it

My Greatness Zone is a result of the passion when I find my unique contribution and live it. It is the place one can change the world for the better in some way. Cindy shares how she has found hers.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:16 AM

We are interdependent.  We are herd/pack animals euphemistically calling ourselves social animals. It is with the help of others tht we reach our greatness.  That Greatness Zone lays in what Suzanne Livingston calls: My unique contribution. For me that is my passion around servant-leadership and building community.  Cindy shares well how the work as a fellow Vistage/TEC Chair has allowed me to fulfill my passion for the past 27 years.


Cindy talks about being good at what she did. She also mentions "I found I became bored easily"  When I can do something well and it becomes  habit, I can coast.  And you know what they say about coasting.  When you're coasting you're going downhill.


The challenge that Lee Thayer throws down is: How will I be better tomorrow that I was today in living my life and performing better than I was today personally and professionally?


Cindy has found her unique contribution that challenges her daily to be better than yesterday.


Remember, I cannot motivate another person. Motivation comes from within.


Motivation:  the state or condition of being motivated.

Motivate:     Providing motive.

Motive:        Goals or objectives of one's actions.Random House Dictionary


You may be able to inspire me, however it is up to me to achieve the "goals or objectives my one's actions."

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'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO

'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Lieutent General William F. Talley, Chief of the U.S. Army Reserve For 30 years, Lieutenant General Jeffrey W.
ozziegontang's insight:

It is about service to others. Some wonderful insights that General Talley shares to the questions asked.


"I have to get people to think I’m a careful, compassionate, caring leader, and then people will help me do things."


The General's words echo what Lee Thayer has been teaching for over 4 decades to leaders: "The most fundamental lessons is that leadership is about commitment, competence and character."

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Innovative Leadership: It Starts With Words [& Stories]

Innovative Leadership:  It Starts With Words [& Stories] | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Innovation leadership needs to start early. Freshman writing may be as good a place as any.

Via Karen Dietz
ozziegontang's insight:

Actually it starts with the way that I think. My thinkiandrogen influences who I am. Who I am influences what I do. The writing part comes from my thinking and my being. Reading Lee Thayer's book Leadership Virtuosity would be very helpful in seeing leadership from this aspect and all its many other perspectives.

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Sue Peterson's curator insight, May 10, 2013 11:05 AM

It seems to me that good, quality classes should always include at least a bit of the skills discussed in this article - reflection, the ability to find different perspectives, the ability to converse about those differences...but, I guess it is good to have some affirmation from Forbes.  

 

Also an interesting read as I have applied for our University's leadership program for students that provides them with mentors as well as specific opportunities for developing leadership skills.  

cvalleva's curator insight, May 11, 2013 6:24 AM

"Evita complejidades innecesarias"

Linda Allen's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:51 PM

Excellent!

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The Universal Language DISC, A Reference Manual

The Universal Language DISC, A Reference Manual | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

For those interested in the DISC profile, the numbers are:

Percentage of population with High C (page 180) – 8%
Percentage of population with High S (page 184) – 45%
Percentage of population with High I (page 188) – 29%
Percentage of population with High D (page 192) – 18%


For me, as a Vistage Chair for 26 years, it has been a wonderful teaching tool for communication. I always remember Meg Wheatly being asked what she was on the Myers-Briggs. Her answer: was: IDKAIDC.  I don't know, and I don't care.  I believe that she was addressing those who neglect getting to know the person and rather use an assessment.


Lee Thayer put is well in Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing.  He talks about creating a Role Desciption rather than a Job Description.


A role description talks about the results that a position requires one to achieve.


A job description talks about the activities that one does in a position.


What has always been interesting to me is that the word "Job" is from the Anglo-Saxon and means: "a lump."  Like a lump of coal.  So 250 years ago they were saying you can't do a "job" of work.  W is about creating something that gives purpose, meaning and significance to one's life. For many that meant working on projects that would not be finished in their lifetime, yet it was contributing to their community.


Now, people are afraid of losing their "jobs."  How many in the US will be going from unemployed and onto disability? 


Read some of Karen Dietz's Just Story It. Life is Improv.  We are all under the same economic cloud at anytime.  Some will succeed and others will fall victim. If I can't imagine it, I can't create it.  What are each of us imagining and creating to contribute to the betterment of mankind.


Some of us may want to start with: Mindfulness as a practice. Then realizing that how I think is who I become and from that being flows the habits that show themselves in what I do...and don't do.  Back to: Be, Do, Be, Do, Be, Do.




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Curiosity & Storytelling: Asking the Right Questions to Motivate, Manage & Lead

Curiosity & Storytelling: Asking the Right Questions to Motivate, Manage & Lead | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Great leaders are able to ask superior questions to achieve great results. If you have all the answers, new ideas & creative solutions may get lost.

Via Karen Dietz
ozziegontang's insight:

We are talking about being in the Learning Mode rather than the Knowing Mode.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 18, 2013 1:36 PM

Author Claire Laughlin has hit the nail on the head -- curiosity will help you more in business than telling people what to do.


Sure, we all need to be directive at times. But most of the time -- particularly as we move from managing to leading -- it is less about being directive and more about sparking conversations.


In other words, as leaders we need to master asking for, listening to, and creating meaning from the stories of others. From there we can influence others by sharing stories in return.


Learning how to ask for, and listen to stories is critical. And this article helps us understand the role curiosity plays in this dynamic -- how to remain curious as a leader so the critical information we need is not blocked from us.


And how to support the curiosity in others so creativity, along with ideas/solutions/innovations, can flourish.


Go read the article. There is great wisdom here.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Renee Baribeau's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:20 PM

It is all in the question.

Karen Dietz's comment, March 18, 2013 9:59 PM
So true Renee and I spend quite a bit of time with clients on the 'art of the question.'
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Ten Leadership Shifts that Change Everything

Ten Leadership Shifts that Change Everything | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Self-inflicted frustrations defeat when leaders won't adapt to new circumstances. Leaders want to change circumstances rather than changing themselves. Seizing opportunities requires shifts in thin...
ozziegontang's insight:

Visit the works of Lee Thayer,

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Hey Leaders! Listening Isn't Easy, But It's Essential - Information Management (blog)

Hey Leaders! Listening Isn't Easy, But It's Essential - Information Management (blog) | Mindfulness & The Mindful Leader | Scoop.it
Hey Leaders! Listening Isn't Easy, But It's Essential Information Management (blog) However, in working with leaders at all levels striving to strengthen their performance, listening skills aren't an issue some of the time; they are an issue nearly...

Via Karen Dietz
ozziegontang's insight:

Karen's insights say it well.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 7:26 AM

From the article:

 

A Warm-Up Exercise for Your Listening Skills

Find a friend and try the following activity:

Conduct a conversation where the only rule is that you and your communication partner must begin each sentence with the last word of your partner’s sentence.

 

Let this run for about three minutes or, until one of you bursts into laughter with some of the resultant silly sentences.

 

 

The payoff from this simple “active listening” activity courtesy of Val and Sarah Gee writing in “Business Improv” (check out my Leadership Caffeine podcast with the authors) is to remind you how difficult it is to stay in the moment and remain focused on the words of your colleague. It takes deliberate effort to silence the symphony (or cacophony) in your mind.

 

 

While you might drive everyone nuts if you practice this technique without them knowing the rules, let the activity serve as a reminder of your obligation to listen harder and seek to understand.

Karen Dietz's comment, February 14, 2013 8:07 AM
Thank you Denyse, Al, and Ozzie for re-scooping and commenting!
Renee Stuart's curator insight, February 14, 2013 10:30 PM

Are you just hearing others or truly listening to others?

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