Mindfulness teaching
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Feature: Work less, do more, live better - Times Higher Education

Feature: Work less, do more, live better - Times Higher Education | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
Times Higher Education Feature: Work less, do more, live better Times Higher Education Instead, my mindfulness to follow regular hours means that my productivity is the same as or even greater than it was before, when I worked 50, 60 or whatever...
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How Yoga Could Help Keep Kids In School

How Yoga Could Help Keep Kids In School | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
Getting mindfulness practices like yoga and meditation into schools could save lives. And a few trillion dollars.

Via Andrew Campbell
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Diane Therrien's curator insight, September 14, 2013 11:00 PM

Grouding the mind in the present moment with yoga...:-)

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Q&A: Dr. Michael Baime explains the trend of 'mindfulness' - SmartPlanet.com (blog)

Q&A: Dr. Michael Baime explains the trend of 'mindfulness' - SmartPlanet.com (blog) | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
Q&A: Dr. Michael Baime explains the trend of 'mindfulness' SmartPlanet.com (blog) This is the biggest transition in mindfulness that we've seen because it's not coming into our culture as a religion, or a form of Buddhism — it's coming through...
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The Science of Passion Based Learning

The Science of Passion Based Learning | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
Teacher educator Peter Skillen reflects on the role of passion in learning, highlighting the research and reminding us that emotion energizes the brain. Mesmerize!

 

“You can’t separate intellect and feelings in the work of the mind. They’re both there all the time. Real learning—attentive real learning, deep learning—is playful and frustrating and joyful and discouraging and exciting and sociable and private all at the same time, which is what makes it great.” ~ Eleanor Duckworth


Via Smithstorian
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Smithstorian's curator insight, April 10, 2013 2:55 PM

Know when to memorize. Know when to mesmerize!

 

If we want students to learn deeply and efficiently we need to understand the role emotions play in different types of learning. We could spend much time discussing what it means to learn. In fact, Seymour Sarason has a whole book called “And What Do You Mean by Learning?”

 

Without getting into it too deeply, we could probably agree that we want students to acquire some knowledge, skills and attitudes. So how should kids ‘get that knowledge’? A constructivist approach would suggest that kids need to assimilate information into existing schema or indeed construct new schema to accommodate new information and ideas. Lev Vygotsky might add that this happens best in a social setting.


Should Students Memorize Content?

 

Other approaches would involve getting students to memorize content or procedural knowledge. While I believe there are times when this is quite appropriate, rote memorization continues to be an overused strategy that is often implemented without a deep understanding of its nuances. It becomes “memorization of decontextualized facts” rather than “active construction of new schema.”

 

These days, there is a very vocal anti-memorization movement! We hear about collaboration, project-based learning, student agency, constructionism, and passion. All of which I support. I’ve been a fan of passion-based learning since I started teaching in 1970. Somehow it just seemed a matter of ethics and the culture of the day. Kids should love learning and love school. It was after all, the “love, peace and happiness” era.

 

Passion Constitutes More than Engagement

 

Passion-based learning has gained more ground recently. Why? Apart from the anti-memorization sentiments, the main rationale seems to be focused on engagement and motivation. Students are more likely to learn if they are captivated, motivated and engaged with the curriculum or projects in hand.

 

We could unpack types and levels of engagement, but I’m sure we’d all agree on this: if the child is deeply engaged in a task there is greater likelihood that she will attend to it better and build requisite understandings and new schema that serve to increase the base of content and process knowledge desired.

 

But passion isn’t just about the motivational aspect. It’s deeper than engagement.

 

There are cognitive processes in the brain that are “turned on” by emotion – be that passion, anger, anxiety or other emotions.

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7 Things Teachers Need to Know about The Relation between The Brain and Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

7 Things Teachers Need to Know about The Relation between The Brain and Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it

The core concept behind effective instruction is differentiation and adaptation particularly now that technology and digital media is taking over every facet of our life. Being able and ready to adapt your teaching methods to your students emerging learning needs is the key to a successful teaching career. Adaptation requires  thinking analytically about what goes on when students are engaged in learning. Some get the point so rapidly without the need for exhaustive explanations but others are slow learners and call for longer time.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Yasemin Allsop's curator insight, August 8, 2013 4:07 AM

Oh, this is just brilliant!

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How to teach ... mindfulness

How to teach ... mindfulness | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
The Guardian Teacher Network has resources to help introduce the concept of mindfulness to pupils, to help them be calm, focused and creative (How to teach ...
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Association for Mindfulness in Education

Association for Mindfulness in Education | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
AME is a collaborative association of organizations and individuals working together to provide support for the growing interest in including mindfulness training as a component of K-12 education.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Leadership Comes From The Heart

Leadership Comes From The Heart | Mindfulness teaching | Scoop.it
Heartfelt leaders will inspire everyone else to endure this year and the next, and will cause them to be courageous as they take risks and do things newly.

Via Smithstorian
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Smithstorian's curator insight, April 10, 2013 3:06 PM

The call to lead requires those who are willing to sail into uncharted waters. This particular moment calls for exquisite leaders, those who know the depth and breadth of the need, who have been gifted (or cursed) with a vision of what might be and who are inspired enough for others to follow by choice.

 

As a nation, Americans are a hopeful people. It comes from our roots and explains why immigrants still come here. We are the land of opportunity. Our schools are critically linked to this national identity. Schools create hopeful futures. Yes, our success is measured now by performance on tests but our work is the future. Policy makers fear that we have or will fail. This fear has defined our current reality. They call upon us to restore the competitive edge for the nation. It may not be fair but it is fact.

 

Rick Hess, in his new book Cage-Busting Leadership, describes present leadership as being like Sisyphus, rolling a boulder up a mountain for eternity. "You take a leadership job full of hope and big-picture vision, and then are suddenly swamped wooing community players, stamping out fires, answering e-mails, dealing with irate parents, or running from meeting to meeting. Before you know it, you're working long days, every day, just to keep things from blowing up. The result is a loss of focus, a tendency to fall back on "more, better" strategies, and a lack of time or energy for precise, creative, empathetic problem-solving" (p. 209). This is not leadership. This may not even allow for excellent management. It certainly will not lead to systemic change. And it is rarely ever connected to the heart of the leader.

 

So, let's consider the relationship between heart and leaders and leadership. Let's go to the source. The root of the word courage from both its French and Latin origins is the word that means heart. There are seldom courses or meetings in which leaders discuss the growth of the heart or evidence of leading by heart.

 

We propose another source. Ask a child what is in their heart and you will likely hear a combination of facts, feelings and fantasy. Ask an adult and you will likely hear what they know or think. Let us restore ourselves by learning from the children. And let's not be complicate in leading educational systems where children lose heart. Let's instead lead systems where the hearts of the children, their clarity and confidence and simple goodness lead us. Then we will always remember who and what we serve.


Continued.....